International Law Situations

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1905 - International law

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Page 70 - States for any ship or vessel to the intent that she may be employed as aforesaid. 10. Increasing or augmenting, or procuring to be increased or augmented, or knowingly being concerned in increasing or augmenting the force of any ship of war, cruiser, or other armed vessel, which at...
Page 72 - ... things as may be requisite for the subsistence of her crew, and except so much coal only as may be sufficient to carry such vessel to the nearest port of her own country, or to some nearer destination, and no coal shall...
Page 101 - Crown, as a station or place of resort for any warlike purpose, or for the purpose of obtaining any facilities of warlike equipment...
Page 20 - ... of active military operations, where war really prevails, there is a necessity to furnish a substitute for the civil authority, thus overthrown, to preserve the safety of the army and society ; and as no power is left but the military, it is allowed to govern by martial rule until the laws can have their free course.
Page 69 - ... as soon as possible after the expiration of such period of twenty-four hours, without permitting her to take in supplies beyond what may be necessary for her immediate use...
Page 72 - No ship of war or privateer of either belligerent shall be permitted, while in any port, harbor, roadstead or waters within the jurisdiction of the United States, to take in any supplies except provisions and such other things as may be requisite for the subsistence of her crew...
Page 67 - It seems, then, to the court, to be a principle of public law, that national ships of war, entering the port of a friendly power open for their reception, are to be considered as exempted by the consent of that power from its jurisdiction.
Page 69 - ... or a merchant ship) shall have previously departed, until after the expiration of at least twenty-four hours from the departure of such last-mentioned vessel beyond the jurisdiction of the United States. If anj...
Page 84 - ... necessary for her immediate use ; and no such vessel which may have been allowed to remain within British waters for the purpose of repair shall continue in any such port, roadstead, or waters, for a longer period than twenty-four hours after her necessary repairs shall have been completed. Provided, nevertheless, that in all cases in which there shall be any...
Page 124 - A neutral Power which receives on its territory troops belonging to the belligerent armies shall intern them, as far as possible, at a distance from the theatre of war.

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