Globalisation and the New Terror: The Asia Pacific Dimension

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David Martin Jones
Edward Elgar Publishing, Jan 28, 2004 - Political Science - 316 pages
Examines trends in new terror, understood here to be the capacity of sub-state actors to secure religious or politically motivated objectives by violent means. Argues that while the use of violence to achieve political ends is scarcely original, what dist
 

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Contents

Contemporary Political Violence New Terror in the Global Village
1
Theorising New Terror
27
Uncertain Diagnosis Megalomaniacal HyperTerrorism and an Unending War for the Future?
29
AntiGlobalisationcom The Paradox and the Threat of Contemporary Violent Protest
40
The alQaeda Threat and the International Response
51
Islamic Extremism and Wahhabism
70
Terror Tactics and Asymmetric Strategies New and Old
77
Trends in the Development of Terrorist Bombing
79
Implications for the Asia Pacific
183
Southeast Asia after September 11
185
The Persistence of Armed Muslim Rebellion in Southeast Asia Implications after September 11
207
Organised Crime and Terrorism in the Asia Pacific Region The Reality and the Response
238
The Politics of the Southeast Asian Heroin Trade
255
Towards a Conclusion
267
PostSeptember 11 Legislative Responses to Terrorism
269
Australia after September 11 The Intelligence Challenge
283

The Chemical Biological Radiological and Nuclear CBRN Threat Exaggeration or Apocalypse Soon?
88
The Asymmetric Character of the Evolving Chemical Biological and Nuclear CBN Threat
119
Information Age Terrorism and Warfare
127
The Networking of Terror in the Information Age
159
Terrorism Today Terrorism and International Regimes
288
Bibliography
298
Index
309
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About the author (2004)

Edited by David Martin Jones, Honorary Reader, School of Political Science and International Studies, University of Queensland, Australia and Visiting Professor, War Studies Department, King's College, London, UK

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