The History of Modern Europe: With an Account of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and a View of the Progress of Society from the Rise of the Modern Kingdoms to the Peace of Paris in 1763, Volume 3

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G.G.J. and J. Robinson, and A. Hamilton, 1789 - Europe

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Page 193 - I say, they will receive a terrible blow this parliament, and yet they shall not see who hurts them. This counsel is not to be contemned, because it may do you good, and can do you no harm : for the danger is past, as soon as you have burned the letter. And I hope God will give you the grace to make good use of it, unto whose holy protection I commend you*.
Page 326 - And now, since I see I cannot do what I came for, I think this no unfit occasion to repeat what I have said formerly, that whatsoever I have done in favour and to the good of my subjects, I do mean to maintain it.
Page 455 - we have hitherto seen serene and quiet times under our three last sovereigns, but I must now warn you to prepare for clouds and storms. Factions arise on every side, and threaten the tranquillity of your native country. But, whatever happen, do you faithfully honour and obey your prince, and adhere to the crown. I charge you never to forsake the crown, though it should hang upon a bush.
Page 325 - That they have traitorously endeavoured to subvert the rights and very being of Parliaments. 6. That for the completing of their traitorous designs, they have endeavoured (as far as in them lay), by force and terror to compel the Parliament to join with them in their traitorous designs, and to that end have actually raised and countenanced tumults against the King and Parliament.
Page 1611 - The History of Modern Europe : with a View of the Progress of Society, from the Rise of the Modern Kingdoms to the Peace of Paris, in 1763.
Page 339 - Houses, may still be the style of your commands ; I may have swords and maces carried before me, and please myself with the sight of a crown and sceptre (though even these twigs would not long flourish, when the stock upon which they grew was dead) : but as to true and real power, I should remain but the outside, but the picture, but the sign of a king.
Page 344 - I do folemnly and faithfully promife, in the fight of " God,- to maintain the juft Privileges and Freedom of Parliament, and to govern by the known Laws of the Land to "my utmoft Power; and particularly, to obferve inviolably " the Laws confented to by me this Parliament.
Page 21 - Bear witness that I die constant in my religion ; firm in my fidelity towards Scotland ; and unchanged in my affection to France. Commend me to my son. Tell him I have done nothing injurious to his kingdom, to his honour, or to his rights ; and God forgive all those who have thirsted, without cause, for my blood.
Page 269 - We consecrate this church, and separate it unto thee as holy ground, not to be profaned any more to common use.
Page 299 - I sail on the Thames, and split my vessel on an anchor, in case there be no buoy to give warning, the party shall pay me damages: but if the anchor be marked out, then is the striking on it at my own peril. Where is the mark set upon this crime? where the token by which I should discover it?

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