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II.—THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

(COVENANTED).

This body was organized in 1840 by two ministers and three elders who withdrew from the synod, or the branch known as the “Old Lights,” on the ground that the latter maintained sinful ecclesiastical relations and patronized or indorsed moral reform societies with which persons of any religion or no religion were connected. Its terms of communion are somewhat stricter than those of the synod. It is a small body, having only 4 organizations, with 37 members, divided among three States.

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12.—THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE

UNITED STATES AND CANADA.

This body was organized in 1883, in consequence of dissatisfaction with the treatment of a question of discipline by the general synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church (New Lights). In the matter of participation in elections it holds with the general synod, and contrary to the synod, that Christians may vote and be voted for, regarding the republic as essentially a Christian republic. It has but 600 members in the United States, who belong to one congregation in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

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385

5

7 419 263 88

8 32 16 107 201

19 752 389 136 518 521

32
4

3
274
211
69
10
43
20
95
193
15

Alabama.. Alaska. Arizona. Arkansas California Colorado. Connecticut Delaware Dist. of Columbia Florida. Georgia. Idaho.. Illinois. Indiana Indian Territory Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey.. New Mexico. New York..

736

21,502

481

188 18,022 18,934 6,968 1,864 4,622 5,128 4,574 14,538

815 77,213 43,351

3,661 40,528 31,393 40,880 5,864

224 12,483

5,105 25,931 15,055 18,250 53,510

1,232 15,065

275

412 106 490 359 464 72

4 109

27 243 170 299 609

18 189

4

507

88

3 93 27 252 185 352 776 24

278

8

97,475

$819,255 1,100

7,750 850 13,900 84,125

357,685 59,771 1,895,675 17,875

643,550 4,300 443,500 14,970 709,800 11,600 950,000 22,265 484,650 61,564 776,025

2,275 40,950 241,404 4,649,410 132,653

2,610,200 21,818 59,158 131,892 1,848,000

91,934 1,299,260 148,020

2,045,870 24,035 454,035

1,100 12,000 38,555 1,752,424 14,075 530,500 79,450 2,242,236 44,966

1,329,910 86,369 530,290 198,421 2,789,652

4,150 88,000 41,981 691,939

865 11,400 3,150

34,800 171,732 6,800,000

2,815 45,675 420,977 22,727,192

956 59,464

1,275 168,564

9 427

17 1,047

8 307

39 903

SUMMARY BY STATES OF ALL PRESBYTERIANS.-Continued.

zations.

Value of
Organi-
Seating

Com-
Church
STATES.

Ca

Church
Edifices.

munipacity Property.

cants. North Carolina ..

411

399 130,785 $818,745 36,102 North Dakota

100 49

9,600
128,025

3,044 Ohio

828
849 287,420 6,722,875

103,607 Oklahoma.

21

9 1,850 14,000 550 Oregon ..

IOI

76 19,092 463,500 5,244 Pennsylvania 1,365 1,506 576,018 19,146,130 216,248 Rhode Island

5 5 1,785 76,000 828 South Carolina 339 347 106,000 896,635

26,118 South Dakota...

134

89
14,896
162,840

4,778 Tennessee.

864 779

250,536 2,002,605 Texas.

816 446 138,707 1,241,485 Utah

20
31
5,180

212,975 688 Vermont.

18 16

4,215 50,400 1,267 Virginia 313 369 106,967 1,234,501

27,746 Washington

99 70 16,860 365,875 4,343 West Virginia . 140 150 43,270

581,150 10.952 Wisconsin..

180
199 45,977 1,004,355

14,154 Wyoming

6

5 960 52,250 364 Total .. 13,476 12,469 4,038,650 $94,869,097 1,278,332

66,573

37,811 CHAPTER XXXII.

PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL BODIES.

1.—THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH.

THE beginnings of the Church of England in this country reach back into the sixteenth century, although the Protestant Episcopal Church was not formally organized as an independent branch until 1785. Clergymen of the Church of England accompanied the early colonists of North Carolina across the sea, one of whom baptized an Indian chief in 1587 in a colony unsuccessfully begun by Sir Walter Raleigh, and also, about the same time, the first white Christian born in that colony. It is probable that the Rev. Francis Fletcher, who accompanied, as chaplain, the expedition of Sir Francis Drake to the Pacific Coast, held services on California soil as early as 1579. He officiated for six weeks in the neighborhood of Drake's Bay. In 1607 worship according to the Anglican ritual was established in the new colonies at Jamestown, Va., and Kennebec, Me. It was soon discontinued in Maine, but in Virginia it was not interrupted. An Episcopal congregation was gathered in New Hampshire in 1631, and parishes were formed in other parts of New England and the Middle States in the early colonial days, Trinity parish, New York City, being constituted in 1693, and Christ Church parish, in Philadelphia, in 1695. The church became the established church in New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia, South Carolina, and Georgia. In Virginia, for a considerable period, no other form of worship was tolerated. In Massachusetts, on the other hand, the Anglican service was not allowed until liberty for it was secured by royal proclamation in 1662. The Episcopal Church received considerable assistance from England, particularly from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, organized in 1701, which sent over many missionaries.

It is said that at the beginning of the Revolutionary War the society was maintaining about eighty missionaries in the colonies.

At the close of the struggle resulting in American independence many of the parishes were without ministerial oversight. Some of the clergymen had left the country during the war, returning to England or going north to the British provinces. In Virginia, where at the outbreak of the war there had been 164 churches and chapels and 91 clergymen, it was found in 1784 that 95 parishes were either extinct or forsaken, and only 28 clergymen remained. At a conference of clergymen and laymen from New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, held in New Brunswick, N. J., in May, 1784, steps were taken to form “a continental representation of the Episcopal Church.” In the following October a convention, representing Delaware and Maryland, in addition to the three States above named, assembled in New York City, and resolved to “recommend to the clergy and congregations of their communion” that “there be a general convention of the Episcopal Church"; that the first meeting of the convention be held in Philadelphia in September, 1785; and that clerical and lay deputies be appointed by the Episcopal churches in the several States, “ duly instructed and authorized” to take

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