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3.—THE FRIENDS (WILBURITE). The Wilburite Friends are thus called because John Wilbur, of New England, was their principal leader in opposing Joseph J. Gurney and his teaching. They separated from the Orthodox body in the New England Yearly Meeting in 1845, in the Ohio in 1854, and in the western Iowa and Kansas in 1877. They are very conservative, and were unwilling to adopt the new methods devised as the church became aggressive in evangelistic and missionary work. They make much of the doctrine of the light within, holding that every man, by reason of the atonement, has an inward seed, or light, given him, which, as it is heeded, will lead him to salvation. They deny instantaneous conversion and the resurrection of the body. The controlling portion of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting hold to the views of Wilbur, though they have not separated from the body of the church further than to decline epistolary correspondence with it. They are counted with the Orthodox branch.

The Wilburite Friends have 5 Yearly Meetings, with 52 organizations, 52 church edifices, valued at $67,000, and 4329 members. They are represented in the States of Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. The average seating capacity of their church edifices is 253, and the average value $1288. There are no halls. A single private house is occupied.

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SUMMARY BY YEARLY MEETINGS.
YEARLY MEETINGS.
Iowa ...
7 7 1,500

$7,000 Kansas

5 5 2,030 10,400 New England.. 5 4 730 10,500 Ohio

24 25

6,735

30,200 Western.

II

II 2,174 8,900

714 495

100 2,451

569

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The Primitive Friends are in faith and practice Wilburite. They separated from the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting because that body refused to correspond with the New England and Ohio (Wilbur) Yearly Meetings, and they do not affiliate with the latter because they recognize the Philadelphia meeting by ministerial visitations and by exchanging certificates of membership.

They have 9 organizations, 5 church edifices, valued at $16,700, and 232 members. They are found only in Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. The average seating capacity of their church edifices is 210, and the average value $3340. One hall, with a seating capacity of 50, and 3 private houses are occupied.

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Arkansas
California
Colorado.
Delaware
District of Columbia.
Florida
Illinois.
Indiana
Indian Territory
lowa
Kansas
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota.
Missouri
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina

5 3 500 II 7 1,785 I

I 20 7 7 1,700 2 1 300 2 2 375

27 7,025
205 189 59,135
IO 3 250
90 90 24,020
70

56 16,334
1
23

21 5,653

24 7,435
32 31 7,050
18
17

$1,950 338 14,100 1,009 300

38 65,500 744 50,000 1,200 70

2,455 380,877 27,780 1,300

468 118,782 10,125 84,815 8,257

66 35,975 1,430 210,850 2,072 122,200 26,900

23

4,650 6

3 675 5 5 950 16

9 1,554 IO II 2,860 43 47 16,635 97 94

24, 245 47 43 17,475

1,458 35, 100

305 10,800

615 6,200

980 8,800

413 271,700 767,450

7,078 36,850 4,904

1,602

3,261

SUMMARY BY STATES OF ALL FRIENDS.—Continued.

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CHAPTER XXII.

FRIENDS OF THE TEMPLE.

This is a small body which had its origin in Würtemburg, Germany, upward of fifty years ago. It is variously called Temple Society, Friends of the Temple, “Hoffmannites." The Rev. Christopher Hoffmann, president of the Temple colonies in Palestine, and author of most of its standard literature, appears to be its chief leader.

The Friends of the Temple have for their great object the gathering of the people of God in Palestine. To this end they constitute Temples, i.e., spiritual communities, in various countries, and these assist in the construction of the Temple in the Holy Land, which is to become a center for regenerated humanity. They believe in the power of God which raised Christ from the dead, to build up a

spiritual house, a holy priesthood," and without formulating their doctrines declare their full acceptance of the Scriptures, of the law of Moses as well as the Gospel of Christ. They believe that all the prophecies will be fulfilled, and that as Christ came to work out the fulfillment, that should also be the mission of his followers. The chief task of the Temple Society is to secure the spiritual development of its members, who are under the oversight of presidents and other officers, and meet for worship on Sundays and on special occasions. No regulations have been adopted concerning baptism and the Lord's Supper, individual convictions being allowed full play.

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