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CHAPTER XX.

THE EVANGELICAL ASSOCIATION.

JACOB ALBRIGHT, originally a Lutheran, born in 1759, was the founder of the Evangelical Association. Near the close of the last century he became an earnest revival preacher. He labored among the German-speaking population, and in 1800 formed a society of converts in Pennsylvania for “social prayer and devotional exercises” every Sunday and every Wednesday night. This was the rise of the movement which resulted in the Evangelical Association. The first conference was held in 1807. This conference elected Jacob Albright a bishop. Two years later a church discipline very similar to that of the Methodist Episcopal Church was published. Some years after the death of Bishop Albright (1808) the name Evangelical Association of North America was adopted. Previously to this his followers had been known as “The Albright People,” or “The Albrights."

In doctrine and polity the Evangelical Association is Methodist. It has annual conferences, a quadrennial general conference, which is the supreme legislative and judicial body, quarterly conferences, presiding elders, and an itinerant and a local ministry, exhorters, class leaders, etc. It also has bishops, who, however, are not elected for life, but for a term of four years. Its Articles of Faith, twentyone in number, are the same in substance and almost the same in language as the twenty-five articles of the Methodist churches, with a few omissions. Formerly the constituency of the church was almost entirely German; now it is largely English.

The Evangelical Association has twenty-six annual conferences. Four of the conferences are in other lands: one in Canada, one in Germany, one in Switzerland, and one in Japan.

The church is in a divided state. In October, 1891, two bodies, each claiming to be the legal general conference, were held, one in Indianapolis, the other in Philadelphia, and each elected a different set of bishops and general church officers. The differences are of long standing. They were augmented in the application in 1890 and 1891 of disciplinary processes to the three bishops of the Association, all of whom were tried and suspended. The Philadelphia General Conference took order restoring Bishop Dubs to his functions. That of Indianapolis, representing the majority, declared the proceedings against Bishops Esher and Bowman void. The secular courts have been appealed to in various cases, and have decided generally in favor of the Indianapolis Conference. The church was divided into two bodies in 1894.

SUMMARY BY STATES.

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87

10, обо

California ..
Colorado..
Florida
Illinois.
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Maryland.
Michigan
Minnesota ..
Missouri
Nebraska
New Jersey.
New York...
North Dakota
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania
South Dakota
Texas ...
Washington.
West Virginia
Wisconsin.

13
3

2
134
124
188
96

3 14 134 134 26 81 IO 86 31 216

25 662 74 8 7 15 224

Seating Value of ComChurch Edifices.

Ca- Church muni

pacity. Property. cants. IO

2,350 $72,100 472 I

150 1,600 4 450

2,000 69 132 35,000 438,500 10,934 10433 30,445 214:390

6,738 147 30,910 299,235

9,761 50

85,600 4,459 3

850 16,000 213 14 5,800 123,900 1,743 97 22,775

188,450

6,677 89 17,165 170,550

6,181 20 6,750 39,700

1,102 47

86,100 IO 2,675 59,250 669 80% 18,870 401,850 6,222 1ο 2,035 21,100

784 215% 60,835 491,975 14,673

24 3.300 63,900 1,199 6277 178,750 1,590,605 42,379 15 2,280 20,450 7 1,400 22,950

296 6

1,200 14,900 451 13 2,825 5,475 565 172 33,525

12,553

8,935

3,458

1,628

355,100

Total ..

2,310 1,899 479,335 $4,785,680 133,313

SUMMARY BY CONFERENCES.

CONFERENCES.

14,620

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30 9,625 $317,250

2,903 IO 2,350 72,100

472 253% 76,900 487,315 15,616 25 4,315 41,550

2,512 61

117,500 4,592 21872 59,790

778,265 17,899 47 12,775 211,400 105 30,200 397,250 9,570 11333,470 228,265 7,140 15,740 178,135

5,069 71 16,860 124,900 5,533 108

3,996

83

25,275 205,700

7,386 Organi

SUMMARY BY CONFERENCES,—Continuid. CHAPTER XXI.

CONFERENCES.

Minnesota
Nebraska
New York
Ohio
Oregon
Pittsburg
Platte River
South Indiana
Texas ...
Wisconsin

Total.

Church
Edifices.

zations.

cants.

2,126

128 61 71 138

32 208 30 44

8 227

89 34 66 140 30 178 13 44

7
173

Seating Value of Com-
Ca.

Church muni-
pacity. Property.
17,165 $170,550 6,081
5,450

64,950 15,370

262,250 5,295 38,835 293,600

8,999 4,500 78,800 1,650 48,735 263.300

9,738 3,585 23,150 1,447 8,800 89,300 2,341

1,400 22,950 296 33,575 357,200 12,652

2,310 1,899 479,335 $4,785,680 133,313

THE FRIENDS.

The Friends, or Quakers, as they are often called, own as their founder George Fox, an Englishman, born in Drayton, Leicestershire, in 1624. He began to preach experimental holiness of heart and life in 1647. He had large congregations, and in 1656 was assisted by sixty ministers. The first general meeting of Friends was held in London in 1668, the second in 1672. The Yearly Meeting was established in 1678. Encountering much opposition and severe persecution in England, many Friends emigrated to this country. A few arrived at Boston in 1656, whence they were subsequently scattered by persecution; many came to New Jersey and Pennsylvania after 1674.

The first Yearly Meeting in America is believed to have been held in Rhode Island in 1661. George Fox met with it in 1672, and in 1683 it was set off from the London Yearly Meeting. It was held regularly at Newport until 1878. Since that date it has alternated between Newport and Portland, Me. Yearly Meetings were organized in Maryland in 1672, in Pennsylvania and New Jersey in 1681; in North Carolina in 1708, and in Ohio in 1812.

The Friends have no creed, no liturgy, and no sacraments. They believe in a spiritual baptism and a spiritual communion, and hold that the outward rites are unnecessary. They accept the Old and New Testaments as a

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