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zines and publications of all kinds. If you consider the amount we get for our Information Service—on salaries, and the amount we would have on printing—it would be a very small portion in comparison with what some Government organization might want to use with its own journals. We are using even country newspapers. We use private sources; it saves the Government money—it is sort of getting millions of dollars of free advertising.

CERTAIN LANGUAGE USED IN JUSTIFICATIONS

Mr. Case. The press has credited you with a campaign to reduce certain bureaucratic language in correspondence, and so forth, and apparently the member of your staff who prepared your statement was thoroughly in accord with what you have been doing to get your message across to the American public, but he has not comported very well in connection with the request for additional publicity funds. He says in the general statement on page 2 [reading] : The Chairman of the Smaller War Plants Corporation has been able, to a great extent, through his own tireless energy, to silhouette the needs of small business in the minds of the American public. Mr. MAVERICK. All I can say is that you have not quite accused me of writing poetry. Mr. CANNoN. I wish to express at this point the appreciation of the committee, and I think I represent the views of the entire com: mittee, for the very complete way in which this justification has been prepared and put together. It is logical, it is comprehensive, and it supplies all the information needed. It is a very satisfactory presentation and we appreciate the form in which it is submitted to the committee. Mr. CASE. I think that the Chairman of the Smaller War Plants on has done a very good job in getting his message before the public. r. MAVERICK. Thank you, gentlemen, very much.

ADDITIONAL PERSONNEL REQUESTS

Mr. CANNoN. Turn, now, to the specific items in the bill. In your tabulation on page 5 Isee that you request an increase of 12.6 man-years at a net cost of $111,230. However, as has been indicated, there is a reduction in the Office of Reports of 39.2 man-years, so that there is an actual increase really of 51.8 man-years in your other units. In the field personnel you request an increase of 60.3 man-years at a net additional cost of $198,014. Do you consider those increases justified by the increased burden placed upon your staff? Mr. MAVERICK. Yes, sir; more than justified. Mr. CANNoN. On page 12, for the Office of Information, taking into account both the departmental and field services, you request practi. cally double the personnel that you have this year. This year you have 18.1 man-years, and you are requesting for 1946 35.3 man-years. Why is such a large increase in percentage necesary? Mr. MAverick. I would like Mr. Denit to answer that question. Mr. DENIT. In connection with the regional part of that estimate, first, Mr. Chairman, we have added 14 stenographic positions, so that information may have proper clerical assistanct; and of that total increase in man-years, roughly 14.2 man-years would be in the stenographic service. - . . Mr. CANNoN. How has that been handled up to this time? Mr. DENIT. We have been trying to handle it by diverting stenographic help from other operations, and we have had some of the men punching typewriters themselves. But there is a good deal of correspondence work in connection with the work apart from writing news stories and that sort of thing, and the increase is quite justifiable. Mr. LUDLow. On page 12 the increase relates only to salaries. note on page 108 of |..iii. that your information item goes to $99,306 in 1945. Does that include something besides salaries? Mr. MAverick. Yes. That includes proration of all expenses. Mr. LUDLow. That accounts for the differential between the two statements, one on page 12 and the other on page 108? Mr. MAvKRick. Yes, sir.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES ON ROLL

Mr. TABER. I am going to start right back at page 5 and will go down the line and try to see what I can find out. At page 5 of the justifications I see you have slipped in here the number of positions. I am going to ask you to tell me how many you have got on the roll as of the 1st of April in each one of these o that is, how many in the department and how many in the elsi. Mr. DENIT. Can we supply the answer for the record? Mr. TABER. You do not have the information here? Mr. MAVERIck. Yes; we have it here, but it will take a little time to find it. SALARY EXPENDITURES FOR CURRENT FISCAL YEAR

Mr. TABER. How much money have you spent out of this departmental salary roll in 1945 down to the 31st of March? Have you got that figure where you can tell us about it? Mr. DENIT. For personal services through March 31 we have expended $4,499,078. Mr. TABER. That is in the departmental salary roll? Mr. DENIT. Departmental only Mr. TABER. I was asking for the amounts separtaely. Mr. DENIT. All right. It is $1,149,961. Mr. TABER. In the field how much? Mr. DENIT. In the field, $1,830,113. Mr.TABER. That is as of March 31. That means a total expenditure of $4,499,078 for 9 months? Mr. DENIT. The amount stated includes $1,519,004 from the working fund that we placed at the disposal of C. A. S. for field administration when it was still operating. That amount is still not broken down on our books. Our total expenditures to March 31 for personal services however were $4,499,078. r. WIGGLEsworth. For 9 months? Mr. DENIT. Yes, sir. Mr. TABER. Did you get that money out of the appropriation that was made for this current year, or where did you get it? Mr. DENIT. That came out of the corporate working capital, and that was subject to a limitation of $10,000,000 set by Congress in the *"propriation hearings last year.

Mr. TABER. There are figures here that I do not just understand. You have got in here $6,400,000, on page 5. o Mr. DENIT. That is projected to *. end of the fiscal year. Mr. TABER. Are you within your budget allocations Mr. DENIT. Yes, sir. Mr. TABER. Have you more people on the roll now than you had earlier? Mr. DENIT. Yes. Mr. TABER. Why? Mr. DENIT. The operations have expanded in the course of the year. Some of our operations were just on a skeleton basis. They were not accomplishing anything at the beginning of the last fiscal year, and we have expanded them to the point where they are producing. Mr. TABER. Have you found that figure so that you can give it to me now? If not, supposing I skip that and go along to the next number. Mr. DENIT. I can give it to you in this way. I can give you the total for the departmental service that was actually on the rolls, and the total for the field. Mr. TABER. I wanted it with the break-down. But I will comeback to it.

REGIONAL offices, DISTRICT of FICEs, AND NAVY INDUSTRY cooper ATION DIVISION PERSONNEL

Mr. TABER. There is one thing I do not understand. You have re. gional offices, district offices, and Navy I. C. D. What is Navy I. C. D. Mr. MAvKRICK. Industry Cooperation Division. Mr. TABER. Why would you need to carry that upon any substantial basis into the next fiscal year? Mr. DENIT. Mr. Taber, that is a reimbursable item. Mr. TABER. Reimbursable from them? Mr. DENIT. From the Navy: yes. We are charged with the positions, but then you will find that the amount of money involved is taken off at the bottom of the estimate on page 6. That is just done as a convenience to the Navy because of their inability to set up administrative machinery or hire people in the field locations where I. C. D. is situated. Mr. TABER. What do the people do that are on that roll? Mr. DENIT. They are on our roll in name only. They work for various commanding officers who are in charge of a Navy office. While they are physically located in Smaller War Plants Corporation offices they are doing a Navy program, not a Smaller War Plants Corporation program. They cooperate with us in screening Navy procurements that we want to put into small plants. Mr. TABER. That is an activity that you are not asking us to provide the funds for or permit you to use funds for. It is simply one that you operate through a transfer. Is that it? Mr. DENIT. That is exactly correct. Mr. TABER. And if the Navy’s activities are cut down as far as ordering stuff goes, this would be cut down. Would that follow? Mr. DFNIT. That would be a matter for the Navy. Just how they wo adjust their operations to change over this function I do not In OW.

Mr. TABER. Any time you are ready, butt in on me with that other information. I will try to go along for a while on the other matters I have.

ECONOMIC RESEARCH AND STATISTICS

What is this set-up that you have that is blooked out as a program of economic research and statistics, $503,000? What page would that be on in the justifications? Mr. DENIT. That would be under the Office of Reports. Mr. TABER. At what page? Mr. MAVERICK. It starts on page 14. Mr. TABER. That does not run anything like that figure. Mr. DENIT. The figures on page 14 represent salaries only. Mr. TABER. You have it here $503,000. Mr. DENIT. That amount is from the green sheet and covers $223,266 salaries; $80,061 miscellaneous objects; and $200,000 surveys. Mr. DENIT. Further information may be found under the discussion of the field offices, the field summary, appearing on page 53. Mr. TABER: What do you do in that set-up? I would be interested in knowing that. Mr. DENIT. That set-up is very important to the Corporation, because it conducts, first, the statistics operation. In order to conduct our program effectively we must know what the needs of small businesses are and what condition all business finds it is in. Therefore we make surveys and we take surveys made by other organizations, analyzing them statistically. Then, too, the Office of Reports maintains statistics by means of which we know how many plants we are helping, how many have been registered with us, how much work our men are doing for the investment that we are putting in personnel. Mr. TABER. Do you not have a record of that, without having to spend all that money? How could you spend all that money just getting that information? Mr. DENIT. The part of the information as to economic surveys cannot be cheaply performed. Mr.TABER. o is the kind of survey that you conduct? Mr. DENIT. The survey personnel would take a locality, a representative industrial locality, and circularize or personally contact a representative number of plants in the locality, ask them a listed number of questions as to their present conditions, what their needs are, what the Smaller War Plants Corporation could do to help them constructively; and much of the findings from our surveys constitute a basis for the information reported to Congress in our bimonthly reports. Mr. TABER. How many people do you have involved in this operation? Mr. DENT. We are only in the Budget for 50 people in the departmental service and 42 people in the field. Bear in mind that the 42 field people are spread around the 14 regional offices. Mr. TABER. What do they do? Do they go around to see people? Mr. DENIT. No. In the main they tabulate the various operating forms which the Corporation is using. In other words, plants register with us on a form that gives essential data as to their present inventories, what their open capacity is, and all that sort of thing. The information is tabulated and recorded, so that the field office is in position to help the plant and know the plant's condition at the time contract opportunities are afforded. Mr. TABER. Is there not any other means in the Government of gathering this information? Mr. DENIT. Wherever other means are available we use them. Mr. TABER. Does not the Census of Manufactures in the Department of Commerce, when that is taken, provide this information? Mr. DENIT. It will provide certain information which is very important to us, and our representatives collaborate with the Bureau of the Budget and the Department of Commerce in determining what shape the survey should take to be of maximum benefit to us. We even use industrial surveys where we can, Mr. Taber. We try to arrange to get survey material and analyze it to see if there is anything in it we can use. Mr. TABER. How do you keep 50 people in that department busy on that kind of a job? Mr. DENIT. We have really kept more than 50 people busy. During the past year, as I indicated to Mr. Cannon, we abolished one large machine tabulation set-up in Chicago. The problems of small business involve substantial research, and we try to keep abreast of current trade publications and industrial trends. We cannot effectively meet the demands of small business unless we are absolutely up-to-date on every phase of industry development which would have a small plant effect. Mr. TABER. I am still unable to see just how you can keep all those people busy. I am afraid you would have a lot of chairwarmers around. Mr. MAVERICK. We kept a lot more busy last year, and we cut them down to bare essentials.

OFFICE OF REPORTS PERSONNEL

Mr. TABER. I would like to see a break-down of these 50 types of positions, such as this budget break-down, by grades and classifications of employees for this whole operation.

Mr. DENIT. We will be glad to put that into the record, sir.

(The information requested is as follows:)

Office of Reports Annual Title Grade Positions salary

Pirector-------------------------------------------------------- 1 $8,000 Deputy director------------------------------------------------ 2 6,875 Economist------ 2 5,750 Chief of section------------------------------------------------- 2 5,500 *conomist.----------------------------------------------------- 3. 4,600 Statistician.-- 2 4,600 Economist -- i 3,800 Statistician. - 3 3. 800 Economist -- 2 3.200 Statistician.-- i 3.2% 9 ------------------------------------- 9 2,500 Research aide------------------------------- 1. 2,600 Economist -- 3 2,000 Secretary------------ 2 2,000 Clerk-stenogra 1. 1,980 Do.--------- 9. 1,620 C*----------------------------------------------------- 6 1,440 Total--------------------------------------------------------------------- 50 153,450

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