Guide to the Mineralogic Collections of the New York State Museum, Issues 58-59

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University of the State of New York, 1902 - Mineralogy - 143 pages
 

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Page 20 - Fig. 63 Fig. 64 Fig. 65 Fig. 66 Fig. 67 Fig. 68 Fig. 69 Fig. 70 Fig. 71 Fig. 72 Fig. 73 Fig. 74 Fig. 75 Fig. 76 Fig. 77 Fig. 78 Fig. 79 Fig. 80 Fig. 81 Fig. 82 Fig. 83 Fig. 84 Fig.
Page 2 - Chancellor, Glens Falls 1892 WILLIAM CROSWELL DOANE DD LL.D. Vice Chancellor, Albany 1873 MARTIN I.
Page 42 - Wyoming, and probably in other States. Salt springs and wells abound in the neighborhood of the salt deposits, and these as well as the waters of salt lakes and sea water are used as sources of the commercial product.
Page 2 - Syracuse 1903 FRANK W. HIGGINS Lieutenant Governor, ex officio 1903 JOHN F. O'BRIEN Secretary of State, ex officio 1903 CHARLES A. GARDINER LL.BMA Ph.D. LL.D. New York 1903 CHARLES S. FRANCA BS - - Troy One vacancy SECRETARY Elected by Regents 1900 JAMES RUSSELL PARSONS JR MA LL.D. DIRECTORS OB" DEPARTMENTS 1888 MELVIL DEWEY MA LL.D.
Page 5 - ... of temperature or evaporation, the cohesive force pulls the particles (molecules) together into a rigid mass. Under favorable conditions such a solid possesses a regular polyhedral form. The process of crystallization has been clearly suggested by Whitlock who says: "This results from the fact that particles or molecules of the substance which, while it was liquid or gaseous, rolled about on one another, have been in some way arranged, grouped, and built up. To illustrate this, suppose a quantity...
Page 34 - Fig. 134. Fig. 135. Fig. 136. Fig. 137. Fig. 138. Fig. 139. Fig. 140. Fig. 141. Fig. 142. Fig. 143. Fig. 144. Fig. 145. Fig. 146. Fig. 147. Fig. 148. Fig. 149. Fig. 150. Fig. 151. Fig. 152. Fig. 153. Fig. 154. Fig. 155. Fig. 156. Fig. 157. Fig. 158. Fig. 159 Fig.
Page 13 - ... or when observed in a similar way in the tourmalin tongs. There are five groups, differing slightly in symmetry, included in the isometric system, three of which contain nearly all the isometric minerals known. Any mineral of which definite crystals are found produces forms which show the symmetry of a distinct group, and it is impossible to find in nature a crystal whose symmetry would place it in more than one group. Normal group !\ Fig. 26 Fig. 27 Fig.
Page 130 - Nickel . . . Nitrogen . . . Osmium . . . Oxygen . . . Palladium . . Phosphorus . . Platinum . . Potassium . . Praseodymium . Rhodium . . Rubidium . . Ruthenium . . Samarium . . Scandium . . Selenium . . . Silicon . . . Silver .... Sodium . . . Strontium . . Sulphur . . . Tantalum . . Tellurium . . Terbium . . . Thallium . . . Thorium . . . Thulium . . . Tin . . . . Titanium . . Tungsten . . . Uranium . . . Vanadium...
Page 2 - Brooklyn 1885 DANIEL BEACH Ph.D. LL.D. - Watkins 1888 CARROLL E. SMITH LL.D. - Syracuse 1890 PLINY T. SEXTON LL.D. - - - Palmyra 1890 T. GUILFORD SMITH MACE LL.D. - Buffalo 1893 LEWIS A. STIMSON BA LL.DMD - - New York 1895 ALBERT VANDER VEER MA Ph.DMD - - Albany 1895 CHARLES R. SKINNER MA LL.D. Superintendent...
Page 46 - The lustre is vitrious and the color bright to dark green. As sand it was originally discovered in the Atacama province in northern Chile, whence its name; and it also occurs in Peru, Bolivia, and Australia. It has been found as a crust on the lavas of Vesuvius and Etna in Italy; also in Saxony and in...

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