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Price 28. 6d.; the same in Case without Description, price 28.
Twelve British Ferns;

Being dried natural Specimens ; Named, Arranged, and Described.
By JOACHIM OTTÉ, F.G.S.

Fcap. 8vo. cloth, coloured by hand, 48. ; plain, 28. 6d. Wild Flowers worth Notice.

A selection from the British Flora of some of our native plants which are most attractive for their Beauty, Uses, or Associations. By Mrs. LANKESTER. Illustrated by J. E. SOWERBY.

“Not a botanical treatise, but a practical minister to a growing taste, the parent of new pleasures and improved habits; an intelligent companion of healthful strolls through sylvan glades."--Morning Post.

“We can assure our readers that Mrs. Lankester's accounts of her favourite plants are well worth their best attention, and her little bits of folk lore and general information are introduced with what we should consider great artistic skill, but that she writes so easily and naturally, that no deliberate effort seems to have been made. We should say especially that any one who wishes to thoroughly enjoy the flowers of their neighbourhood will do well to purchase. Wild Flowers worth Notice.' It is a little book that teaches a great deal, and in so pleasant a way, that to be wearied is impossible."- Era.

“We heartily recommend this exceedingly pretty little volume to the large class who delight in flowers, whether in the field or in the garden, but who, deterred by its innumerable words of learned length and thundering sound,' decline to enter on the study of botany as a science. They will find nearly one hundred wild flowers, such as they meet with in any walk, so accurately represented in colours by Mr. Sowerby, that the recognition will be a pleasure instead of a difficulty, and so agreeably described by the authoress, that a new pleasure is imparted to even such well. known plants as buttercups and daisies.”—Gentleman's Magazine.

“We are so frequently asked by our country friends to recommend books on Flowers and Ferns that shall be interesting without being too scientific, that we are heartily glad to have the opportunity of so doing which the present elegant but cheap little volume affords."'-- Practical Farmers' Chronicle.

It must not be supposed that Mrs. Lankester only deals with botanical facts ; she has much legendary lore to relate, and many curious anecdotes to tell ; so that, whether regarded as a handbook for a country walk, or as a volume for perusal in the library, “Wild Flowers worth Notice' is equally acceptable.”-Shipping and Mercan. tile Gazette.

“We could while away a long summer day talking of the pleasant things sug. gested by this little book. Although all intelligent persons cannot become botanists, not to know the wild flowers of our country is to be ignorant both of our country and ourselves. And this little book will, as a pocket companion during holiday ramblesthe descriptions and plates being both good-destroy this ignorance in reference to at least a hundred plants. After mastering it, the student will be not a little astounded at his own learning, when he surveys it in the systematic chapter of contents."Atheneum.

“A graceful little volume. The reader may be surprised to find how many flowers are properly considered wild, although they are constantly seen in cultivation. Mrs. Lankester's list comprises about a hundred, from the domestic poppy to the stately water-lily; and each has its own portrait, carefully drawn and coloured from life, by a most painstaking and affectionate artist. It is the very book for an autumn ramble." - Illustrated Times.

Second Edition, much improved and enlarged. Fcap. 8vo. price 28. 6d.

Fully illustrated.
Old Bones.

Or, Notes for Young Naturalists. By the Rev. W. S. SYMONDS,
Rector of Pendock, Author of “Stones of the Valley,” &c.

“Although modest in its plan, it is a very superior work-broad, exact, suffi. ciently explained by well-chosen examples, and amply illustrated.”Daily News.

"A small manual of palæontology, very carefully compiled, and likely to be very useful to those who have not the means to purchase or leisure to read Professor Owen's larger works.”-Spectator.

A well written and admirably illustrated manual for the student of natural history, and one which will no doubt become extensively popular.”Literary Gazette.

'Beautifully got up, judiciously condensed, and artistically arranged ; to say nothing of its literary ability, which certainly bespeaks a close and shrewd observer.' -Era.

“ The plan pursued by Mr. Symonds is a very simple one. He adopts the classification of Professor Owen, and carries the young naturalist from family to family, beginning with man and ending with the lowest fishes, making his own remarks as he goes on. We recommend these notes. The volume is neatly got up, and deserves a sale amongst the class for whom it is intended.”—Athenæum.

“Young naturalists cannot do better than possess themselves of a copy of 'old Bones.' It is the work of an ardent lover of nature, with a mind richly stored with knowledge and high scientific acquirement."- Edinburgh Witness.

“ The pleasing and highly-interesting style of Mr. Symonde's work is such, that no sooner is its perusal commenced, than the reader becomes gradually and imperceptibly entwined in the beauties of the subject, and willingly continues his course, until at last, upon reaching the concluding pages of the work, he finds that he has attained so complete a knowledge of the principles of one of the most interesting sciences, that he will feel an irresistible desire to pursue his studies to the highest possible point. We can unhesitatingly say that, from no work upon the subject which we have seen will an equal amount of information be obtained so entirely without labour, and in so short a time.”-Mining Journal.

"A very useful little work, well calculated to afford information to the student of natural history." --Observer.

“We cannot conclude without recommending all with whom we have influence to purchase this wonderfully cheap and yet elegantly illustrated little volume."Practical Farmers' Chronicle.

“ To such of our readers as may be dabbling in the science, or may wish to have such a general knowledge of its outlines and acquaintance with its nomenclature as may enable them to take some interest in the many ways in which it meets them in their literature or social intercourse of the day, we cordially recommend the book. It is the work of a writer at once eloquent and scientific-a scientific man who has worked up his knowledge, not by manuals or short cuts, but by hard, practical, patient investigation of the thing which he describes,--a clergyman, who has studied nature without ever losing sight of nature's God.Church Review.

Post 8vo. numerous illustrations, price 18.

Photographs for the Magic Lantern:

How to Take and How to Show them. By SAMUEL HIGHLEY,
F.G.S., F.C.S., &c. Being the subject matter of two Lectures
delivered before the Photographic Society of London, and the
Society of Arts, January, 1863.

Complete in cloth, price 28. 6d.

Prof. Huxley's Lectures “On the

Origin of Species.”

1. The Present Condition of Organic Nature.-2. The Past Condition of Organic Nature.-3. The Method by which the Causes of the Present and Past Conditions of Organic Nature are to be discovered. The Origination of Living Beings.—4. The Per. petuation of Living Beings, Hereditary Transmission, and Variation. --5. The Condition of Existence as affecting the Perpetuation of Living Beings.-6. A Critical Examination of the Position of Mr. Darwin's Work “On the Origin of Species,” in relation to the complete Theory of the Causes of the Phenomena of Organic

Nature. " Readers who cannot accept Mr. Darwin's doctrines and conclusions will still be delighted with these lectures, since they embody so much curious information and so many important principles of biological science, expressed so clearly as to render the book, even to readers possessing scarcely any previous knowledge of the subject, not only intelligible but more interesting than any romance.”-Weldon's Register.

Price 28. 6d.

Landscape Photography.

Or, Complete and Easy Description of the Manipulations and
Apparatus necessary for the production of Landscape Pictures,
Geological Sections, &c., by the Calotype, Wet Collodion, Collodio-
Albumen, Albumen-gelatine, and Wax-paper processes ; by the
assistance of which, an Amateur may at once commence the art.

By JOACHIM OTTÉ, F.G.S. "To the commencing amateur the book seems very well adapted, and to one who wishes to practise photography as an amusement or an adjunct to any other pursuit, it may be cordially recommended.”- Literary Gazette.

Demy Svo. cloth, price 128.

The True Figure and Dimensions of

the Earth.

Newly determined from the results of geodetic measurements and pendulum observations; compared with the corresponding theoretical elements, for the first time deduced upon purely geometrical principles; and considered both with reference to the progress of scientific truth, and as bearing upon the practical interests of British commerce and navigation; in a Letter addressed to George Biddell Airy, Esq., M.A., Astronomer Royal. By JOHANNES VON Gum

Second edition, entirely recast, with thirty illustrative diagrams.

[graphic]

Third Edition, much enlarged, with full description of the various

parts of the Instrument, price 28. 6d. plain; 48. coloured.

Half-hours with the Microscope.

By EDWIN LANKESTER, M.D. Illustrated by 250 Drawings from Nature by Tuffen West.

CONTENTS. Half-an-hour on Structure.

Half-an-hour at the Pond-side. Half-an-hour in the Garden.

Half-an-hour at the Seaside. Half-an-hour in the Country. Half-an-hour In-doors.

Appendix.—The Preparation and Mounting of Objects. “This wonderful anatomy of sight divides clearly one blood corpuscle from another ; marks distinction from the blood of a fowl and that of a frog; separates the filaments of the finest plants; delineates the bearded hair of the sowthistle ; makes a picture of vine or potato blight ; pries into the hollow cells of the passion flower ; and searches the warm depths of the poppy. Then it dignifies into isolation the minutest hair on the ear of a mouse, the mouth of a flea, the fang of a spider, the eye of a fly, the smallest particle that goes to make up a drift of swandown. Elementary Manuals of Science are seldom so well adapted to please, no less than to teach The compiler of the volume has this conspicuous merit, that he deals with wonders, and never exaggerates them.”-Athenaum.

“The beautiful little volume before us cannot be otherwise than welcome. It is in fact, a very complete manual for the amateur microscopist . :. The 'HalfHours' are filled with clear and agreeable descriptions, whilst eight plates, executed with the most beautiful minuteness and sharpness, exhibit no less than 250 objects with the utmost attainable distinctness."-Critic.

It is a most interesting study only to observe how Nature in her smallest productions, developes the figures as well as the organization by which the functions of the largest animals and vegetable creations are performed. But the botanist, the physiologist, the zoologist, the anatomist, the geologist, and the chemist, may derive assistance from this book in accomplishing their several pursuits, and exploring the secret springs of the operations which they manipulate.”Morning Post.

“Contains some good advice as to the choice of specimens for examination, with a view of gaining an insight into the structure of plants and animals, and of turning a pleasant amusement into an interesting study. The collected specimens of natural objects are carefully described and illustrated by plates on a magnified scale. To such as are beginning the study, we can recommend this manual as a useful guide."--Economist.

Demy Svo. price 6d.

The Mechanics of the Heavens ;

And the new Theories of the Sun's Electro-Magnetic and Repulsive
Influence :

: a Paper submitted to the British Association, at Cambridge, with Notes and Postscript. By JAMES REDDIE, Author of Vis Inertiæ; or, Fallacies affecting Science.

Demy 8vo.

On Atmospheric Electricity.

By REUBEN PHILLIPS.

Complete in cloth, price 28. 6d.

Prof. Huxley's Lectures “ On the

Origin of Species.”

1. The Present Condition of Organic Nature.-2. The Past Condition of Organic Nature.-3. The Method by which the Causes of the Present and Past Conditions of Organic Nature are to be discovered. The Origination of Living Beings.-4. The Perpetuation of Living Beings, Hereditary Transmission, and Variation. -5. The Condition of Existence as affecting the Perpetuation of Living Beings.-6. A Critical Examination of the Position of Mr. Darwin's Work “On the Origin of Species,” in relation to the complete Theory of the Causes of the Phenomena of Organic

Nature. " Readers who cannot accept Mr. Darwin's doctrines and conclusions will still be delighted with these lectures, since they embody so much curious information and so many important principles of biological science, expressed so clearly as to render the book, even to readers possessing scarcely any previous knowledge of the subject, not only intelligible but more interesting than any romance."—Weldon's Register.

Price 28. 6d.

Landscape Photography,

Or, Complete and Easy Description of the Manipulations and Apparatus necessary for the production of Landscape Pictures, Geological Sections, &c., by the Calotype, Wet Collodion, CollodioAlbumen, Albumen-gelatine, and Wax-paper processes ; by the assistance of which, an Amateur may at once commence the art. By JOACHIM OTTÉ, F.G.S.

"To the commencing amateur the book seems very well adapted, and to one who wishes to practise photography as an amusement or an adjunct to any other pursuit, it may be cordially recommended.”Literary Gazette.

Demy 8vo. cloth, price 128.

The True Figure and Dimensions of

the Earth.

Newly determined from the results of geodetic measurements and pendulum observations; compared with the corresponding theoretical elements, for the first time deduced upon purely geometrical principles; and considered both with reference to the progress of scientific truth, and as bearing upon the practical interests of British commerce and navigation; in a Letter addressed to George Biddell Airy, Esq., M.A., Astronomer Royal. By JOHANNES VON GUM

Second edition, entirely recast, with thirty illustrative diagrams.

PACH.

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