The Banquet Book: A Classified Collection of Quotations Designed for General Reference, and Also as an Aid in the Preparation of the Toast List, the After-dinner Speech, and the Occasional Address; Together with Suggestions Concerning the Menu and Certain Other Details Connected with the Proper Ordering of the Banquet

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1902 - Alcoholic beverages - 475 pages
A collection of American culinary history including cookbooks, menus and ephemera from the 16th through to the 21st century. Through this culinary archive researchers can explore changing attitudes towards diet and health, homemaking, commercial dining and the industrialisation of food production. The material has been collected over many years by Jan Longone, an adjunct curator in the University of Michigan Special Collections Research Center, and her husband University of Michigan Emeritus Professor Daniel T. Longone.

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Page 322 - Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine; Or leave a kiss but in the cup And I'll not look for wine. The thirst that from the soul doth rise Doth ask a drink divine; But might I of Jove's nectar sup, I would not change for thine.
Page 318 - I fill this cup to one made up Of loveliness alone, A woman, of her gentle sex The seeming paragon; To whom the better elements And kindly stars have given A form so fair, that, like the air, Tis less of earth than heaven.
Page 154 - Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears; while the used key is always bright, as Poor Richard says. But dost thou love life, then do not squander time, for that is the stuff life is made of, as Poor Richard says.
Page 357 - Now stir the fire, and close the shutters fast, Let fall the curtains, wheel the sofa round, And while the bubbling and loud hissing urn Throws up a steamy column, and the cups That cheer but not inebriate, wait on each, So let us welcome peaceful evening in.
Page 319 - I love thee, I love but thee, With a love that shall not die Till the sun grows cold, And the stars are old, And the leaves of the Judgment Book unfold!
Page 273 - I'll give thee this plague for thy dowry : be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumny.
Page 327 - My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite.
Page 327 - All thoughts, all passions, all delights, Whatever stirs this mortal frame, All are but ministers of Love, And feed his sacred flame. Oft in my waking dreams do I Live o'er again that happy hour, When midway on the mount I lay, Beside the ruined tower.
Page 163 - If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost ; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.
Page 153 - Love thyself last: cherish those hearts that hate thee; Corruption wins not more than honesty. Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace, To silence envious tongues. Be just, and fear not: Let all the ends thou aim'st at be thy country's...

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