Leaves of Grass

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G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1897 - American poetry - 446 pages

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ElisabethZguta - LibraryThing

Walt Whitman was a visionary, a tolerant and kind man, who spoke out about injustices and did not allow himself to conform. Looking into the soul of human motivation and reaction, he purposefully ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Zumbanista - LibraryThing

I'm not a huge fan of poetry normally but I do like history, so thought I'd give Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman a try. I downloaded my copy from Project Gutenberg after doing a bit of research. I ... Read full review

Contents

I
3
II
25
III
73
IV
89
V
106
VI
114
VII
123
VIII
128
XXI
249
XXII
258
XXIII
270
XXIV
271
XXV
304
XXVI
309
XXVII
317
XXVIII
319

IX
132
X
136
XI
142
XII
151
XIII
159
XIV
163
XV
170
XVI
174
XVII
175
XVIII
190
XIX
203
XX
213
XXIX
326
XXX
327
XXXI
332
XXXII
340
XXXIII
345
XXXIV
346
XXXV
364
XXXVI
379
XXXVII
403
XXXVIII
417
XXXIX
425
Copyright

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Page 249 - WHEN lilacs last in the dooryard bloom'd, And the great star early droop'd in the western sky in the night, I mourn'd, and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring.
Page 28 - A child said What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands, How could I answer the child? I do not know what it is any more than he. I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful green stuff woven.
Page 39 - I am the poet of the Body and I am the poet of the Soul, The pleasures of heaven are with me and the pains of hell are with me, The first I graft and increase upon myself, the latter I translate into a new tongue.
Page 27 - Out of the dimness opposite equals advance, always substance and increase, always sex, Always a knit of identity, always distinction, always a breed of life.
Page 43 - I believe in the flesh and the appetites, Seeing, hearing, feeling, are miracles, and each part and tag of me is a miracle.
Page 254 - Dark mother always gliding near with soft feet, Have none chanted for thee a chant of fullest welcome? Then I chant it for thee, I glorify thee above all, I bring thee a song that when thou must indeed come, come unfalteringly.
Page 117 - I inhale great draughts of space, The east and the west are mine, and the north and the south are mine. I am larger, better than I thought, I did not know I held so much goodness.
Page 254 - Then with the knowledge of death as walking one side of me, And the thought of death close-walking the other side of me, And I in the middle as with companions, and as holding the hands of companions, I fled forth to the hiding receiving night that talks not, Down to the shores of the water, the path by the swamp in the dimness, To the solemn shadowy cedars and ghostly pines so still.
Page 115 - Afoot and light-hearted I take to the open road, Healthy, free, the world before me, The long brown path before me leading wherever I choose. Henceforth I ask not good-fortune, I myself am goodfortune, Henceforth I whimper no more, postpone no more, need nothing; Done with indoor complaints, libraries, querulous criticisms, Strong and content I travel the open road.
Page 72 - I depart as air, I shake my white locks at the runaway sun, I effuse my flesh in eddies, and drift it in lacy jags. I bequeath myself to the dirt to grow from the grass I love, If you want me again look for me under your boot-soles.

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