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THE SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION BILL FOR 1951

SUBCOMMITTEE ON LEGISLATIVE BRANCH APPROPRIATIONS

CHRISTOPHER C. MCGRATH, New York, Chairman MICHAEL J. KIRWAN, Ohio GORDON CANFIELD, New Jersey GEORGE W. ANDREWS, Alabama ERRETT P. SCRIVNER, Kansas

THURSDAY, JULY 13, 1950. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

CONTINGENT EXPENSES, 1950

WITNESS

HARRY LIVINGSTON, Disbursing Clerk

SELECT AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES

Mr. McGrath. We have for consideration at this time the supplemental estimates for fiscal year 1950 as contained in House Document 640.

We have with us Mr. Livingston. Have you a statement you would like to make, Mr. Livingston?

Mr. LIVINGSTON. We have in this deficiency bill pending a requested additional $50,000 for special and select committees for 1950. For the fiscal year 1950 there was originally appropriated $600,000. Then we had in the first deficiency bill an extra $100,000.

As of June 30, 1950, we had spent $685,607 of that money. Of course on these committees it is a hard thing to say what expenses they will or have incurred to be paid after the end of the fiscal year

of 1950. We have approximately $15,000 left from the original $700,000. We are doubtful whether that will carry us through.

Some of these bills come in as late as 6 or 7 months after the end of the fiscal year. It is a question whether the committees might be able to get by with $30,000 or $35,000. It is just a question.

Mr. MCGRATH. Do you think you can get along with $35,000 instead of $50,000?

Mr. LIVINGSTON. I think possibly $30,000 might be enough. It is a guess. In fact, I think we should recommend that we cut that to $30,000. Mr. McGratu. Are there any questions on that item, gentlemen?

. Mr. MCGRATH. Mr. Canfield.

Mr. CANFIELD. Mr. Livingston, for the purposes of the record, do you have a breakdown of the amounts expended? I ask that in the event that someone on the floor asks for the same.

Mr. LIVINGSTON. There is our chart.

(1)

Mr. McGRATH. If there is no objection that will be made a part of the record. (The document is as follows:) Investigating and select committees authorized by the 81st Cong.

(Jan. 3, 1949, to June 30, 1950)

Committee

Amount authorized

Amount Balance expended to available, June 30, 1950 July 1, 1950

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Agriculture Committee (Congressman Cooley, chairman),

H. Res. 112, Mar. 16, 1949; H. Res. 210, June 23, 1949. Armed Services Committee (Congressman Vinson, chairman),

H. Res. 234, June 8, 1949; H. Res. 242, June 15, 1949. Banking and Currency Committee (Congressman Hays,

chairman), H. Res. 351, Oct. 31, 1949; H. Res. 332, Oct. 19,

1949 District of Columbia Committee (Congressman McMillan,

chairman), H. Res. 132, Apr. 1, 1949 District of Columbia Committee (crime investigation) (Con

gressman Davis of Georgia, chairman), H. Res. 340, Oct. 11,

1949; H. Res. 396, Oct. 19, 1949.. Education and Labor Committee (Congressman Barden,

chairman), H. Res. 75, Feb. 21, 1949; H. Res. 113, Mar. 10,

1949; H. Res. 306, Aug. 11, 1949
Expenditures in Executive Departments (Congressman

Dawson chairman), H. Res. 88, Feb. 9, 1949; H. Res. 127,
Apr. 1, 1949; H. Res. 252, July 14, 1949; H. Res. 524, May
11, 1950..
Economic Report, Joint Committee (Senator McMahon,

chairman), S. Con. Res. 26 May 4, 1949 (half Senate, half
House) (House share).
Foreign Affairs Committee (Congressman Kee, chairman),

H. Res. 206, May 23, 1949; H. Res. 237, June 23, 1949
GAR Encampment, Joint Committee (Congressman Jacobs,

chairman), H. Con. Res. 103, Aug. 25, 1949 (Senate to re

imburse one-half expenses)
Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee (Congressman

Crosser, chairman), H. Res. 107, Mar. 16, 1949; H. Res 157,
Apr. 14, 1949.
Judiciary Committee (general) (Congressman Celler, chair-

man), H. Res. 137, Mar. 16, 1949; H. Res. 156, May 12, 1949;

H. Res 415, Mar. 23, 1950.
Judiciary Committee (displaced persons) (Congressman

Celler, chairman), H. Res. 238, June 21, 1949; H. Res. 246,
July 4, 1949.
Labor Management Relations (Joint Committee) (Senator

Murray, chairman), s. Con. Res. 10, Apr. 14, 1949 (half

Senate, half House) (House share).
Lobbying Activities (Select) (Congressman Buchanan, chair-

man), H. Res. 298, Aug. 12, 1949; H. Res. 397, Oct. 13, 1949;

H. Res. 402, Mar. 23, 1950-
Merchant Marine and Fisheries (Panama Canal) (Congress-

man Hart, chairman), H. Res. 44, Feb. 28, 1949; H. Res. 122,

Apr. 1, 1949
Merchant Marine and Fisheries (general) (Congressman Hart,

chairman), H. Res. 215, May 31, 1949; H. Res. 233, June 23,

1949
Moral Rearmament at Switzerland (special) (Congressman

Preston, chairman), H. Res. 232, June 1, 1949.
Post Office and Civil Service Committee (Congressman Mur-

ray, chairman), H. Res. 114, May 2, 1949; H. Res. 115, May

12, 1949; H, Res. 472, Mar. 23, 1950.
Public Lands Committee (Congressman Peterson, chairman),

H. Res. 66, Feb. 17, 1949; H. Res. 72, Apr. 1, 1949
Public Works Committee (Congressman Whittington, chair-

man), H. Res. 326, Aug. 23, 1949; H. 339, Sept. 28, 1949. Small Business Committee (select) (Congressman Patman,

chairman), H. Res. 22, Feb. 2, 1949; H. Res. 82, Feb. 9,

1949; H. Res. 436, A pr. 5, 1950.Un-American Activities Committee (Congressman Wood,

chairman), H. Res. 78, Feb. 9, 1949; H. Res. 482, Mar, 23,

1950. Ways and Means Committee (Congressman Doughton, chairman), H. Res. 293, Aug. 17, 1949; H. Res. 333, Sept. 28, 1949..

Total...

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Special footnote: Fffective July 1, 1949, by authority of the Legislative Appropriations Act, 1950, a specific appropriation of $150,000 for investigating purposes was given to the Appropriations Committee; said appro. priation is available for disbursement on fiscal-year basis and paid out of the appropriation: “Salaries, officers and employees.” Amount disbursed to June 30, 1950, $79,293.89. Balance available, July 1950 $70,706.11.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS, (CONTINGENT FUND)

Mr. McGRATH. Are there any other items you wish to testify on?

Mr. LIVINGSTON. Mr. Chairman, we submitted an extra supplemental estimate to the Bureau of the Budget yesterday for $10,000 for miscellaneous items, 1950, which are a part of the contingent fund. The original appropriation for miscellaneous items in the contingent fund was $227,000. As of June 30, 1950 we had spent $210,023.51, which leaves a balance of $16,976, but we have outstanding bills to be paid, when deliveries are made that are obligated, of $20,257.or that we know of up to date. There will probably be additional amounts involved of which we presently may not know of.

Mr. McGrath. Are there any questions, gentlemen?

Mr. SCRIVNER. In connection with this item I think it might be well, Mr. Livingston, if you would just summarize what these contingencies are. Of course, as members of the committee, we know that this item covers a lot of things like the gratuities that are granted by resolutions when employees of the House pass away, and many of those items. Would you just run over them rapidly to give the members a little better idea of what is involved?

Mr. LIVINGSTON. Gentlemen, under the miscellaneous items, of course, our No. 1 item is miscellaneous. We buy most of our machinery and special equipment and so forth for the House from that. Item 2 is newspapers. Item 3 is typewriter machines. We have spent this year $51,551.

Mr. SCRIVNER. That was brought about largely by the increase in the number of clerical personnel in Members' offices?

Mr. LIVINGSTON. Yes.

Mr. CANFIELD. Right there, Mr. Livingston, do you know how many Members of the House are buying electric typewriters?

Mr. LIVINGSTON. There is no authorization to buy any electric typewriters through our office. We do not buy them for the Members of the House.

Mr. CANFIELD. Of course, there is no legislation bearing thereon at this time?

Mr. LIVINGSTON. That is correct.

Mr. MCGRATH. Some of the Members have purchased them out of their own personal funds?

Mr. LIVINGSTON. Any electric typewriters which are bought are from personal funds.

In 1950 fiscal year the gratuities for the funerals of the deceased employees were very large, amounting to almost $50,000.

Another item is our miscellaneous payroll on House resolutions that are passed from time to time for slary increases, or additional positions which averaged almost $6,000 per month. That is where most of the increase we are asking for will be used.

Mr. SCRIVNER. That is all I have, Mr. Chairman.
(Discussion off the record.)
Mr. McGRATH. Thank you, Mr. Livingston.
Mr. LIVINGSTON. Thank you, gentlemen.

THURSDAY, JULY 13, 1950.

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS, 1950

SUBWAY TRANSPORTATION, CAPITOL AND SENATE OFFICE BUILDING

Mr. MCGRATH. Gentlemen, we have a statement from Mr. Lynn, the Architect of the Capitol, with regard to a $200 item for 1950 in House Document 640, which, without objection, will be inserted at this point.

(The statement is as follows:) Subway transportation, Capitol and Senate Office Buildings: Additional

amount, fiscal year 1950, to be derived by transfer from appropriation “Capitol Building and Repairs, 1950”

$200 For the fiscal year 1950, an appropriation of $2,000 was allowed for maintenance of the subway transportation system between the Capitol and Senate Office Building.

After the usual annual repairs and overhaul had been made to the subway cars and track system at a cost of $1,700, it became necessary to make emergency repairs to one of the subway cars, due to an accident.

When the car, carrying 18 passengers, was approaching the Senate Office Building end of the subway and the operator applied the brakes, the car wheels started slipping, due to some grease which had gotten on the rails, apparently from one of the food conveyors which had crossed the subway tracks in delivering food from the Capitol to the Senate Office Building restaurants. The overhead trolley hit the bumper, bending the four cylinders which lead from the car to the overhead rail, and the cylinders have had to be replaced. The trolley wheels and one balance wheel were also damaged and the frame and pins on the overhead trolley were bent, necessitating repairs.

The necessary repairs were made by the Naval Gun Factory at a cost of $500. As only a $300 balance is available under the annual appropriation to meet the cost of these repairs, an additional $200 is required.

THURSDAY, JULY 13, 1950. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS SALARIES, LIBRARY OF7 CONGRESS, PROPER, AND INCREASE OF

LIBRARY, GENERAL, 1951

WITNESSES DR. LUTHER H. EVANS, LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS VERNER W. CLAPP, CHIEF ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN JOHN C. L. ANDREASSEN, DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATION FREDERICK H. WAGMAN, DIRECTOR OF PROCESSING BURTON W. ADKINSON, DIRECTOR OF REFERENCE STRENGTHENING OF LIBRARY COLLECTIONS AND SERVICES RELATING

TO ASIATIC AREA

GENERAL STATEMENT

Mr. McGRATH. Dr. Evans, you have two supplemental items here, one of $78,000 and one of $100,000, in House Document 640. Will you please justify those for the committee?

Dr. Evans. Mr. Chairman, we thought we would be negligent if we did not at this time, in terms of the shocking developments in Asia that have caught us all somewhat unawares, bring back to the com

mittee certain requests that would strengthen the Library in relation to its collections and its services relating to the Asiatic territories, including the Philippines, which are so near as to be in the same situation, and also our work regarding Soviet Russia.

We have asked here for some positions to be engaged in the acquisition of material and the arranging, and to some extent the cataloging, but for the most part the service of material in addition to the acquisition.

Mr. SCRIVNER. What do you mean by the service of material?

Dr. EVANS. Making it available to the Government when they wish to use it. In the case of maps, putting them on the shelves and being able to get them out when they are requested. To some extent they would like lists of materials on particular subjects, and we would make them.

These positions would be asked for for only three-fourths of the year, making the item $78,000 instead of $104,000, which would be the gross amount.

Then we have asked for $100,000 to be added to our fund for the purchase of books and the making of microfilms and other copies, so that we can rapidly acquire material to fill the gaps in our collections.

A lot of the material is available if we send microfilm cameras to various libraries that have the material. Some of the material in original form would be available by purchase or by exchange or other method of acquisition.

All these positions, except for two in the Law Library, have been requested before, so that we know that we need them. We know that they fit into our operations, except for the two in the Law Library, which is a new request.

We have recently appointed a new law librarian after a vacancy of some time, and this is one of the areas where he feels the Library is deficient.

Mr. Chairman, the amount for increase of the collections does not apply to law, because our appropriation there is a little more adequate than the other one in terms of our needs, and we would be willing to use some of our present money in "Increase law” if the present bill is passed as it now stands, but for the other part the probsem is so large and our other demands are so great that we are asking for this additional amount.

As regards the personnel, we believe that this personnel is needed on a permanent basis so that that part of the appropriation we would be requesting to be added to our base for future years. That would be in the amount of about $104,000. That would be the amount for the following year, plus any in-grade increases.

Mr. Chairman, those are the basic things. I believe these are urgently needed positions and funds in terms of the responsibilities of the Library of Congress in relation to the present situation and even a peacetime situation, where this Government has such enormous responsibilities.

My staff has given me here a few samples of requests that have been made upon us recently, some of which we have been able to satisfy, and some of which we have not been able to satisfy.

EXAMPLES OF RECENT REQUESTS FOR MATERIAL

We have had requests on the Opening of Korea to the Western World in the nineteenth century.

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