The Pursuit of Knowledge Under Difficulties: Its Pleasures and Rewards, Illustrated by Memoirs of Eminent Men

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Harper & Brothers, 1840 - Education - 562 pages
 

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Page 186 - It can engrave a seal, and crush masses of obdurate metal like wax before it, — draw out, without breaking, a thread as fine as gossamer, and lift a ship of war like a bauble in the air. It can embroider muslin, and forge anchors, — cut steel into ribands, and impel loaded vessels against the fury of the winds and waves.
Page 218 - ... hunger and nakedness to the utmost extremity of human suffering. I have known what it is to have food given me as charity to a madman ; and I have at times been obliged to shelter myself under the miseries of that character, to avoid a heavier calamity. My distresses have been greater than I have ever owned, or ever will own to any man. Such evils are terrible to bear ; but they never yet had power to turn me from my purpose. If I live, I will faithfully perform, in its utmost extent, my engagement...
Page 243 - Seathwaite and Ulpha, annexed together, would be apt to cause a general discontent among the inhabitants of both places ; by either thinking themselves slighted, being only served alternately, or neglected in the duty, or attributing it to covetousness in me ; all which occasions of murmuring I would willingly avoid.
Page 107 - Soon after he married, Robert told me, in a letter, that he had sold his fiddle, and got a wife.' Like most poor men, he got a wife first, and had to get household stuff afterward. It took him some time to get out of readyfurnished lodgings.
Page 230 - April, 1785. This being done, I then condescended to see how other people wove ; and you will guess my astonishment when I compared their easy modes of operation with mine. Availing myself, however, of what I then saw, I made a loom in its general principles nearly as they are now made. But it was not till the year 1787 that I completed my invention, when I took out my last weaving patent, August the 1st of that year.
Page 107 - Paradise Lost,' and some novels. These books he lent to Robert ; who spent all his leisure hours in reading the 'Seasons,' which he was now capable of reading. I never heard him give so much praise to any book as to that.
Page 188 - That he should have been minutely and extensively skilled in chymistry and the arts, and in most of the branches of physical science, might perhaps have been conjectured ; but it could not have been inferred from his usual occupations, and probably is not generally known, that he was curiously learned in many branches of antiquity, metaphysics, medicine, and etymology ; and perfectly at home in all the details of architecture, music, and law.
Page 163 - An admirable and most forcible way to drive up water by fire, not by drawing or sucking it upwards, for that must be as the philosopher calleth it, infra spheeram activitatis, which is but at such a distance. But this way hath no bounder, if the vessels be strong enough ; for I have taken a piece of a whole cannon, whereof the end was burst, and filled it three...
Page 28 - New Experiments Physico-Mechanical, touching the spring of the air and .its effects.
Page 263 - There is a house full of people, and right nasty. The Czar lies next your library, and dines in the parlour next your study. He dines at ten o'clock and six at night ; is very seldom at home a whole day. Very often in the King's yard, or by water, dressed in several dresses. The King is expected there this day ; the best parlour is pretty clean for him to be entertained in ; the King pays for all he has.

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