Sonnets of Three Centuries: A Selection Including Many Examples Hitherto Unpublished

Front Cover
Sir Hall Caine
E. Stock, 1882 - Sonnets, English - 331 pages
Page proofs for the first edition, bound in red binder's cloth. Inscribed "This is the Revise Proof. A good number of additions & alterations were afterwards made. The proof is valuable as containing certain corrections (as in the cases of Watts's sonnets) which it was found too late to set right in type. 1882. THC." With Caine's ms. revisions and markings. The contributors include the three Rossettis, Oliver Madox Brown, Richard Watson Dixon, Dobson, Philip Bourke Marston, Swinburne, John Addington Symonds, and William Bell Scott.
 

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Page 15 - Full many a glorious morning have I seen Flatter the mountain-tops with sovereign eye, Kissing with golden face the meadows green, Gilding pale streams with heavenly alchemy; Anon permit the basest clouds to ride With ugly rack on his celestial face And from the forlorn world his visage hide, Stealing unseen to west with this disgrace.
Page 57 - It is a beauteous evening, calm and free, The holy time is quiet as a Nun Breathless with adoration; the broad sun Is sinking down in its tranquillity; The gentleness of heaven is on the Sea: Listen!
Page 41 - CROMWELL, our chief of men, who through a cloud Not of war only, but detractions rude, Guided by faith and matchless fortitude, To peace and truth thy glorious way hast ploughed...
Page 30 - Death be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for, thou art not so, For, those, whom thou think'st, thou dost overthrow, Die not, poor death, nor yet canst thou kill me. From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures...
Page 14 - When to the sessions of sweet silent thought I summon up remembrance of things past, I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought, And with old woes new wail my dear time's waste...
Page 13 - When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state, And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself, and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possess'd, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope...
Page 81 - To fetters, and the damp vault's dayless gloom, Their country conquers with their martyrdom, And Freedom's fame finds wings on every wind.
Page 12 - Shake hands for ever — cancel all our vows — • And when we meet at any time again, Be it not seen in either of our brows That we one jot of former love retain.
Page 26 - Let me not to the marriage of true minds Admit impediments. Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove : O, no ! it is an ever-fixed mark That looks on tempests and is never shaken ; It is the star to every wandering bark, Whose worth "s unknown, although his height be taken.
Page 48 - In vain to me the smiling mornings shine, And reddening Phoebus lifts his golden fire : The birds in vain their amorous descant join, Or cheerful fields resume their green attire. These ears, alas ! for other notes repine ; A different object do these eyes require ; My lonely anguish melts no heart but mine ; And in my breast the imperfect joys expire...

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