The Monthly Magazine, Volume 1

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Sherwood, Gilbert and Piper, 1796

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Page 269 - The centre mov'd, a circle straight succeeds, Another still, and still another spreads ; Friend, parent, neighbour, first it will embrace ; His country next, and next all human race ; Wide and more wide, th...
Page 238 - They say concerning their government, that " yielding to the ardent desire by which it is animated to procure peace for the French republic, and for all nations, it will not fear to declare itself openly.
Page 133 - twas on graves they trode ; ' 'Tis hither we are bounde :' And many a tombstone gostlie white Lay inn the moonshyne round. And when hee from his steede alytte, His armour black as cinder Did moulder, moulder all awaye, As were it made of tinder. His head became a naked skull ; Nor hair nor eyne had hee ; His body grew a skeleton, Whilome so blythe of blee.
Page 115 - ... are read without any other reason than the desire of pleasure, and are therefore praised only as pleasure is obtained; yet, thus unassisted by interest or passion, they have passed through variations of taste and changes of manners, and, as they devolved from one generation to another, have received new honours at every transmission.
Page 89 - Were there no public institutions for education, a gentleman, after going through, with application and abilities, the most complete course of education which the circumstances of the times were supposed to afford, could not come into the world completely ignorant of every thing which is the common subject of conversation among gentlemen and men of the world.
Page 133 - twas on graves they trode ; " 'Tis hither we are bounde ;" And many a tombstone gostlie white Lay in the moonshyne round. And when hee from his steed alytte, His armour, black as cinder, Did moulder, moulder all awaye, As were it made of tinder.™* His head became a naked scull ; Nor haire nor eyne had hee.
Page 132 - I'll take thee to the bridal bed, And night shall end but then.' ' And where is, then, thy house and home ; And where thy bridal bed?' ' 'Tis narrow, silent, chilly, dark ; Far hence I rest my head.
Page 374 - Man, by two days labour, may gain enough to feed him the rest of the week; Which I take to be a very plain ground of the laziness attributed to the People...
Page 18 - Pray be so good as to tell me how you have employed yourself in the different periods of your life ; from the earliest time you can remember, for instance. C. I have a very confused remembrance of living in a pleasant garden full of fruit, and of being turned out because I had not minded the injunctions that were laid upon me. After that I became so very naughty that I got a severe ducking, and was in great danger of being drowned.
Page 132 - Or dost thou love no more ? He went abroade with Richard's host, The Paynim foes to quell ; But he no word to her had writt, An he were sick or well. With...

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