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at the full possession of her Lord in everlasting glory and bliss. The finger of God appears plainly stamped upon the book of the Apocaİypse,' it fo far exceeds the reach of human composition. The divine pen is vilible in every line, as each sentence is apparently ' written with such precision and accuracy, that

a word cannot be added or retrenched without derogating from the sense. The figures and allegories here employed are truly sublime, grand, and beautiful, and closely adapted in all their parts to the subject. Some of them are borrowed from the ancient prophets, but heightened by superior strokes. St. John's subject, the history of Christ's kingdom, as it surpasses in dignity the object of all preceding prophecies, so he exhibits it in colours that outshine all former prophetic descriptions

This kingdom of Christ, the greatest of all kingdoms, and his government of it, the most perfect of all governments, are described in a style proportionably exalted. The ancient prophets announced the orders and instructions they received from God, and were only favoured with visions in some particular cases: but the beloved disciple of Christ, not only receives from his Lord the verbal account he delivers, but is admitted to see transacted before him every scene of the history which he writes. Again, the ancient prophets chiefly confined their accounts to the temporary traníactions of kingdoms; but St. John, after giving the history of the Christian Church for the whole time of her existence in this world, de

particular interest every Christian must take in that part of the hiitory, which relates to the present time, and to those scenes which are approaching. Much instruction may be drawn from the present state of the Church, as described by our prophetic writer, and caution ought to be the result for what we find is to happen hereafter. If God reveals to us mys. teries, it is for our instruction: if he discloses .. to us future events, doubtless he does it to give us warning to prepare for them. This kind of economy almighty God observed towards mankind from the beginning, that in consequence of such previous admonitions, his faithful fervants should withdraw themselves from approaching calamities,' while the wicked might impute to theirownobstinacy the punishments that fell upon them. This bountiful administration of providence appeared very confpicuous in favour of the Jews, who were generally forewarned by the prophets of the great events that concerned them. The same course we find the Almighty has pursued in the Christian age of the world. He has not indeed sent a succession of prophets as he did to the Jews. The only considerable prophet Christianity can claim is St. John the apostle: but then he as far excels any one of the ancient prophets, as his Apocalypse con-. tains more matter, and comprises a larger field of history, He grasps the whole period of Christianity. He describes the birth of Christ's, Spouse, his Church, and gradually conducts her through her whole progress, till she arrives

at the full possession of her Lord in everlasting: glory and bliss. The finger of God appears plainly stamped upon the book of the Apocalypse, it so far exceeds the reach of human composition. The divine pen is visible in every line, as each sentence is apparently written with such precision and accuracy, that a word cannot be added or retrenched without derogating from the sense. The figures and allegories here employed are truly sublime, grand, and beautiful, and closely adapted in all their parts to the subject. Some of them are borrowed from the ancient prophets, but heightened by superior strokes. St. John's - subject, the history of Christ's kingdom, as it surpasses in dignity the object of all preceding prophecies, so he exhibits it in colours that outshine all former prophetic descriptions This kingdom of Christ, the greatest of all kingdoms, and his government of it, the mort perfect of all governments, are defcribed in a style proportionably exalted. The ancient prophets announced the orders and instructions they received from God, and were only favoured with visions in some particular cases: but the beloved disciple of Christ, not only receives from his Lord the verbal account he delivers, but is admitted to see transacted before him every scene of the history which he writes. Again, the ancient prophets chiefly confined their accounts to the teniporary transactions of kingdoms; but St. Johii, after giving the history of the Christian Church for the whole time of her existence in this world, de

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scribes her future triumphant state in the heavenly Jerusalem, the period of which will be equal to that of eternity. Befides the picture which he there gives of the heavenly Jerusalem, is drawn with such exquisite art, is painted with such striking colours, and enriched with such charming scenes, and with such a collection of the choicest, the most valuable, and the most shining objects in nature, that the whole furpasses greatly whatever human conception is capable of imagining or combining together. Such then being the extent, the usefulness, and the excellence of the prophecy delivered in the Apocalypse, what can be more curious or interesting than a history founded upon it, which is what we offer to the Chriftian reader?

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