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LETTER FROM WOODROW WILSON MEMORIAL

COMMISSION

WASHINGTON CATHEDRAL,

Washington, D.C., August 31, 1966. Hon. EDWARD V. LONG, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C.

Sır: Dean Sayre is not in the city and cannot reply to your letter of August 11 in connection with your questionnaire on data about individual citizens kept by Government agencies.

I believe, however, that he would feel that there is little point in responding to the questionnaire. The Woodrow Wilson Memorial Commission has gathered no information on American citizens and will soon conclude its sole function: Preparation of a report recommending congressional action on a suitable memorial to Woodrow Wilson. Sincerely yours,

Mrs. JULIEN J. MASON, Administrative Secretary to the Dean.

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SUBCOMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE INTERNAL SECURITY ACT AND OTHER INTERNAL SECURITY LAWS

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Printed for the use of the Committee on the Judiciary

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

88-493

WASHINGTON : 1968

EURCHASED intimo

DOC. EX. PROJECT

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

JAMES O. EASTLAND, Mississippi, Chairman JOHN L. MCCLELLAN, Arkansas

EVERETT MCKINLEY DIRKSEN, Illinois SAM J. ERVIN, JR., North Carolina

ROMAN L. HRUSKA, Nebraska THOMAS J. DODD, Connecticut

HIRAM L. FONG, Hawaii PHILIP A. HART, Michigan

HUGH SCOTT, Pennsylvania
EDWARD V. LONG, Missouri

STROM THURMOND, South Carolina
EDWARD M. KENNEDY, Massachusetts
BIRCH BAYH, Indiana
QUENTIN N. BURDICK, North Dakota
JOSEPH D. TYDINGS, Maryland
GEORGE A. SMATHERS, Florida

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SUBCOMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE INTERNAL
SECURITY ACT AND OTHER INTERNAL SECURITY LAWS

JAMES 0. EASTLAND, Mississippi, Chairman

THOMAS J. DODD, Connecticut, Vice Chairman JOHN L. MCCLELLAN, Arkansas

ROMAN L. HRUSKA, Nebraska SAM J. ERVIN, JR., North Carolina

EVERETT MCKINLEY DIRKSEN, Illinois BIRCH BAYH, Indiana

HUGH SCOTT, Pennsylvania
GEORGE A. SMATHERS, Florida

STROM THURMOND, South Carolina
J. G. SOURWINE, Chief Counsel
John R. NORPEL, Jr., Acting Director of Research

RESOLUTION

Resolved, by the Internal Security Subcommittee of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, That the attached report entitled “Legislative Recommendations” is hereby authorized to be reported favorably to the full committee, to be printed and made public.

Approved: January 23, 1968.

REPORT OF THE INTERNAL SECURITY SUBCOMMITTEE TO THE

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY During two sessions of the Congress' the Internal Security Subcommittee held open public hearings on the general subject of gaps in our internal security laws. In all, 10 separate hearing sessions were held ? and testimony was received from 19 witnesses. In addition to this testimony, the committee received for the record a number of letters from law professors and law school deans, and various other communications with respect to the subject matter of the hearings. These hearing records have been previously published.?

This report recommends legislative action which the subcommittee considers desirable in the interest of national security. It is based on the hearings referred to above, on some 3 years of hearings respecting security in the Department of State, and on analysis of developments subsequent to the referenced hearings. Especially noteworthy in this category of recent developments is the ruling of the U.S. Supreme Court in United States v. Eugene Frank Robel, decided December 11, 1967, which invalidated subsection 5(d) of the Internal Security Act prohibiting members of Communist-action organizations from working in designated defense facilities.

Various other decisions construing, limiting, impairing, or invalidating provisions of internal security laws also have been studied by the subcommittee and its staff in view of the fact that “Whenever any law for the protection of our national security is stricken down by a court decision, Congress has the responsibility of deciding how to meet the problem that law was intended to deal with.'

It is not necessary for the purposes of this report to discuss in detail the long series of Supreme Court decisions affecting national security. Various listings of such decisions and discussions of the problems they present are available from authoritative sources.5

The recommendations in this report are not comprehensive of all the suggestions made to the subcommittee or considered by it, and do not even include all of the possible legislation which individual members of the subcommittee may favor, but have been limited to

1 89th Cong., second sess.; 90th Cong., first sess.
? June 23, 24, 27. July 29, 30, 1966; May 2, 9, 10 (two sessions), 24, 1967.

+ Quoted from statement by the chairman at the opening of referenced hearings on gaps in internal security laws.

Inter alia: Annual Report of the National Association of State Attorneys General, June 1957; Report of the Conference of State Chief Justices, July 13, 1957; Reports of the American Bar Association Committee on Communist Tactics, Strategy and Objectives, 1956 and 1957, Aug. 21, 1958, and Feb. 24, 1959 (see Annual Report, vol. 84, at p. 607); Annual Report of the Internal Security Subcommittee for 1955 issued Jan. 15, 1956, sec. 12; Reports of the County Counsel of Los Angeles, “United States Supreme Court Decisions Favorable to Communists Have Harmed Management, Labor and the American People." August 1965; vide also, from the same office September 15, 1966: "The Bill of Rights, Rights for All-Not the Few;'' ibid., Feb. 15, 1957: “United States Supreme Court Decisions Favorable to Communists." See also: "Is the Supreme Court Really Supreme?" July 1967 issue of Reader's Digest, Eugene H, Methvin; Congressman Edwin E. Willis (Louisiana), July 25, 1967: (reference to Subversive Activities Control Board)-“This Board was established by the Internal Security Act of 1950 to perform an important quasi-judicial function. * • Through a variety of suits and motions, the Communists succeeded in having the effectiveness of various SACB proceedings nullified and, in other cases, tremendously delaying the Board's work.", Congressional Record, July 25, 1967, p. H-9314,

3 In 1966 and 1967.

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