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COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

JAMES 0. EASTLAND, Mississippi, Chairman JOHN L. MCCLELLAN, Arkansas

EVERETT MCKINLEY DIRKSEN, Illinois SAM J. ERVIN, JR., North Carolina

ROMAN L. HRUSKA, Nebraska THOMAS J. DODD, Connecticut

HIRAM L. FONG, Hawaii PHILIP A. HART, Michigan

HUGH SCOTT, Pennsylvania
EDWARD V. LONG, Missouri

STROM THURMOND, South Carolina
EDWARD M. KENNEDY, Massachusetts
BIRCH BAYH, Indiana
QUENTIN N. BURDICK, North Dakota
JOSEPH D. TYDINGS, Maryland
GEORGE A. SMATHERS, Florida

SUBCOMMITTEE ON ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE

EDWARD V. LONG, Missouri, Chairman PHILIP A. HART, Michigan

EVERETT MCKINLEY DIRKSEN, Illinois BIRCH BAYH, Indiana

STROM THURMOND, South Carolina QUENTIN N. BURDICK, North Dakota

BERNARD FENSTERWALD, Jr., Chief Counsel

BERNARD J. WATERS, Minority Counsel

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

NOVEMBER, 1967. Hon. JAMES 0. EASTLAND, Chairman, Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: Recent proposals to consolidate various Government records and files into a so-called National Data Center have raised serious questions of the potential invasion of privacy of our American citizens. The Senate Subcommittee on Administrative Practice and Procedure has been deeply concerned with this problem which can best be described as "computer privacy.”

During hearings on this subject, the subcommittee attempted to determine what type of information would, in fact, be put into this data center, but the plans had not been completely formalized. It then occurred to us that before we can talk about what type of information would be put into a National Data Center, we must ask what type of information does the Government presently maintain on our American citizens. Accordingly, the subcommittee sent a questionnaire to every department and agency of the Federal Government seeking this information.

Because of the voluminous response to the questionnaire, we obtained the services of the Bureau of the Census to assist us in compiling and collating the answers into logical and readable form.

It is my understanding that this is the first time such an inventory of Government information has ever been compiled. Because I consider this to be of great importance to my colleagues on the Judiciary Committee, and because it has usefulness to researchers, scientists, and academicians in and out of Government, I, therefore, request that the attached document be printed as a committee print. Kind regards. Sincerely,

EDWARD V. LONG, Chairman.

FOREWORD

The Senate Subcommittee on Administrative Practice and Procedure is deeply concerned about the various ways in which the privacy of our American citizens is being invaded.

More than 2 years of hearings have shown us that perhaps one of the most subtle invasions of privacy is that which is accomplished through the use of the information which the Government maintains on American citizens. The following inventory of Government information is, to our knowledge, the first ever prepared.

In order to make this study available to my colleagues and to the general public, I have requested that it be made into a committee print.

EDWARD V. LONG,

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