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THE FIRST CONFERENCE

OF THE

LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY ORGANIZATION

THE UNIVERSITY
JULY 28-AUGUST 5, 1967 OF MICHIGAN

AUG 15 1507

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SUBCOMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE INTERNAL SECURITY ACT AND OTHER INTERNAL SECURITY LAWS

OF THE

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

UNITED STATES SENATE

Printed for the use of the Committee on the Judiciary

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON : 1967

81-0620

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office

Washington, D.C. 20402 Price 40 cents

PURCHASED THROUGH

DOC. EX, PROJECT

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

JAMES 0. EASTLAND, Mississippi, Chairman JOHN L. MCCLELLAN, Arkansas

EVERETT MCKINLEY DIRKSEN, Mlinois SAM J. ERVIN, JR., North Carolina

ROMAN L. HRUSKA, Nebraska THOMAS J. DODD, Connecticut

HIRAM L, FONG, Hawaii PHILIP A. HART, Michigan

HUGH SCOTT, Pennsylvania
EDWARD V. LONG, Missouri

STROM THURMOND, South Carolina
EDWARD M. KENNEDY, Massachusetts
BIRCH BAYH, Indiana
QUENTIN N. BURDICK, North Dakota
JOSEPH D. TYDINGS, Maryland
GEORGE A. SMATHERS, Florida

SUBCOMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE INTERNAL

SECURITY ACT AND OTHER INTERNAL SECURITY LAWS

JAMES O. EASTLAND, Mississippi, Chairman

THOMAS J. DODD, Connecticut, Vice Chairman JOHN L. MCCLELLAN, Arkansas

ROMAN L. HRUSKA, Nebraska SAM J. ERVIN, JR., North Carolina

EVERETT MCKINLEY DIRKSEN, Illinois BIRCH BAYH, Indiana

HUGH SCOTT, Pennsylvania
GEORGE A. SMATHERS, Florida

STROM THURMOND, South Carolina
J. G. SOURWINE, Chief Counsel
BENJAMIN MANDEL, Director of Research

RESOLUTION

Resolved, by the Internal Security Subcommittee of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, That the attached staff study entitled "The First Conference of the Latin American Solidarity Organization, July 28-August 5, 1967,” be printed and made public.

Approved July 18, 1967.

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FOREWORD

"Concurrently with the systematic preparation of Communist subversive agents, a series of meetings, conferences, congresses and so on are being held in Cuba, attended by Communist elements of America and by sympathizers, the real purpose of which is to discuss plans, fix objectives and issue directives that must be observed by the different groups, with respect to Communist subversive action of every form."

This statement was contained in the report submitted to the Council of the Organization of American States by the Special Consultative Committee on Security on February 20, 1963.

1 here is no doubt that the almost steady procession of Communist conclaves in Havana stems from the fact that a totalitarian ideology, such as found in the Communist society, needs constant direction from its summit in order to function properly.

It is evident that this constant need for direction results in part from inadequate initiative on the part of the lower hierarchy and cadres, which, subjected to constant supervision and discipline by the Party, have learned to shun the responsibility of individual decisions for the more secure procedure of accepting directives emanating from above.

Although it may seem contradictory, Latin American Communists, especially the younger generation, have always posed a problem to the more sophisticated European Communist leadership because of their lackadaísical attitude and endemic flair for showmanship or "machismo". (manliness), which seem to survive despite massive doses of Marxist indoctrination.

Fidel Castro, exceptionally conscious of this fact because he himself is a prime example, is beset by a constant compulsion to assert his leadership over hemispheric communism which he has come to regard as his personal sphere of influence.

Emboldened by the real and imagined results of the Tricontinental Conference, the Politburo of the Cuban Communist Party has stepped up its efforts to establish and consolidate its claim of ideological and tactical leadership in the Western Hemisphere.

This has become necessary because Castro's leadership has been challenged in the very places where his influence appears strongest: Guatemala and Venezuela, two of the primary objectives of Cubandirected subversion in the hemisphere.

The Cuban Communists make it no secret that their plans envision the conquest of the hemisphere in the next decade through a series of Vietnam-type wars.

Once their objective is reached—the Cuban leaders are already in the process of implementing their plans—thousands of Cuban technicians and advisers, anxious to follow the steps of their Soviet mentors, are poised to spread out from Cuba and occupy positions of leadership in Latin America.

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