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HEARINGS

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BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON THE CENSUS OF

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THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

1st SESSION, 60TH CONGRESS

MEMBERS OF COMMITTEE ON THE CENSUS

SIXTIETH CONGRESS

EDGAR D. CRUMPACKER, Chairman
EDWIN C. BURLEIGH

CHARLES F. BARCLAY
JAMES A. HUGHES

JAMES HAY
CHARLES T. DUNWELL

JOSEPH T. ROBINSON
HIRAM R. BURTON

WILLIAM B. WILSON
NATHAN W. HALE

HANNIBAL L. GODWIN
WILLIAM M. CALDER

WILLIAM E. COX
HOWARD M. SNAPP

COURTNEY W. HAMLIN
JOHN W. LANGLEY

NELSON R. JACOBSON, Clerk

WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

1908

8-35148

HA37

FEB 33 196

D. or D.

THIRTEENTH CENSUS.

RooM OF THE COMMITTEE ON CENSUS,

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, D. C., January 22, 1908. The Committee met at 10 o'clock a. m., Hon. E. D. Crumpacker in the chair. STATEMENT OF MR. S. N. D. NORTH, DIRECTOR OF THE CENSUS.

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the Committee, the sections of the pending bill are on the left-hand side of the document which has been printed, and the corresponding sections of the Twelfth Census act, or the permanent Census act, as the case may be, are on the righthand side.

The changes in the language which are suggested by this bill are all indicated by the italics, so that it will be possible for any member of the Committee to refer to the corresponding sections of the bill and the law and note without any difficulty any change that is suggested in the drafted bill.

These changes are not numerous. The lines of the Twelfth Census act, in accordance with the instructions received from the House Census Committee and the Senate Census Committee, are followed literally, or with mere verbal changes, wherever it was possible to do so, taking cognizance of the establishment of the permanent Census Office in the interval, and wherever it was desirable for purposes of greater efficiency and greater economy to introduce more marked changes.

The great problem in connection with the drafting of this bill was to fit the temporary decennial period into the permanent Census Office, and it is believed that that has been successfully accomplished by section 2 of the bill, which is the string upon which the whole thing hangs; that is the section which describes the three years beginning one year before and continuing two years after the decennial census as “ the decennial census period.". The bill provides that during that period the whole Office, including the permanent Census as well as the temporary clerks, shall go on to a lump-sum appropriation, abandoning for that interval the annual appropriations in the legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation bill which are now made for the permanent Office, that situation to continue during this three-year period, at the end of which time employment of temporary clerks then on the roll would terminate, the annual appropriations would begin again as they now are made, and the Office would fall back automatically into the situation which now exists.

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