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HEARINGS ON SCIENCE LEGISLATION

S. 1297 and Related Bills

MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1945

UNITED STAIES SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS,
SUBCOMMITTEE ON WAR MOBILIZATION,

Washington, D. C. The subcommittee met at 10:10 a. m., pursuant to call of the chairman, in room 357, Senate Office Building, Senator Harley M. Kilgore, West Virginia, presiding,

Present: Senator Harley M. Kilgore, West Virginia; Senator Warren G. Magnuson, Washington; and Senator J. William Fulbright, Arkansas.

Also present, Dr. Herbert Schimmel and Mr. John H. Teeter.

The CHAIRMAN. In opening these joint hearings before the Subcommittee on War Mobilization and the two subcommittees of the Senate Commerce Committee which are concerned with science legislation, I should like to make some introductory remarks before calling on the distinguished scientists who are here to testify on the several bills we are charged with considering.

The development of our scientific and technical resources has long been a problem of major concern to the Military Affairs Committee and its Subcommittee on War Mobilization, of which I am chairman. In the closing months of the Seventy-seventh Congress, more than 3 years ago, the subcommittee began its investigations of the wartime mobilization of scientific personnel and facilities. Throughout the Seventy-eighth Congress comprehensive hearings were held on the integration of science and technology into the war program.

About a year ago the subcommittee undertook a factual survey of the Government's wartime program of research and development.

Specifically, the subcommittee called attention to the enormous wartime increase in the Government's expenditures for scientific research-from approximately $70,000,000 in 1940 to more than $700,000,000 in 1944-and to the need for a continued high level of research in the postwar period, with the Federal Government contributing such support as may be required to supplement the work of private organizations and institutions. The subcommittee's report also suggested the desirability of legislation to establish a central scientific agency of the Government which would (1) provide funds for research predominantly in the public interest, notably national defense, health and medical care, and the basic sciences; (2) provide for the efficient coordination of all federally supported research,

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