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c. Responsible for a company personnel program, including responsibility for developing and recommending personnel policies to top company management. The work force served ranges in size from about 300 to 1000 and consists, almost exclusively, of plant and office jobs. May have labor relations responsibilities, either for negotiations with unions on problems of contract interpretation, or for serving as a member of the company team in union contract negotiations.

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL III

5-04-3

A. Responsible for a company personnel program including responsibility for developing and recommending personnel policies to top company management. The work force served ranges in size from about 1000 to 5000 and consists of plant, office, and technical, professional, and administrative jobs. May have labor relations responsibilities, either for negotiations with unions on problems of contract interpretation, or for serving as a member of the company team in union contract negotiations.

or B. Responsible for a plant or establishment personnel program, within policies, systems, and general methods established by the parent company. The work force served ranges in size from about 5000 to 15000 and consists of plant, office, and technical, professional, and administrative jobs. Labor relations responsibilities, If any, are confined to negotiations with unions on problems of contract interpretation.

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL TV

5-04-4

A. Responsible for a company personnel program including responsibi11ty for developing and recommending personnel policies to top company management. The work force served ranges in size from about 5000 to 15000 and consists of plant, office, and technical, professional, and administrative Jobs. Labor relations responsibilities, if any, are confined to negotiations with unions on problems of contract interpretation.

B. Responsible for a company personnel program including responsibility for developing and recommending personnel policies to top company management. The work force served ranges from about 1000 to 5000 and consists of plant, office, and technical, professional, and administrative jobs. Labor relations responsibilities include major responsibility for representing the company as principal representative in union contract negotiations.

84357 0–62-pt. 1-9

ATTORNEYS

ATTORNEY

Performs work involved in providing consultation and advice to operating officials of the company with respect to its legal rights, privileges, and obligations. Performs such duties as anticipating arry legal problems or risks involving the company and advising company officials; preparing and reviewing various legal instruments and documents, such as contracts for leases, licenses, sales, purchases, real estate, etc.; keeping informed of proposed legislation which might affect the company and advising the appropriate company officials; examining and checking for legal implications public statements or advertising material; advising company whether to prosecute or defend law suits; acting as agent of the company in its transactions; and applying for patents, copyrights, or registration of the company's products, processes, devices, and trademarks. I. As a trainee (LL.B with membership in bar) performs routine

6-01legal work, such as preparing briefs or drawing up contracts for review and evaluation by attorneys of higher grade. Receives immediate supervision in assignments designed to provide training in the application of established methods and techniques of legal research, drafting of legal instruments, etc.

II. Performs a variety of legal assignments, primarily in drawing 6-01-2 up contracts which require some ingenuity and an ability to evaluate the legal sufficiency of contract terms. Receives general supervision during assignments, with most of work reviewed by an attorney of higher grade. Responsibility for final action is usually limited to matters which are covered by Instructions and prior approval of a superior.

III. Performs a variety of broad legal assignments, primarily in 6-01-3 the study and analysis of legal questions, problems, or cases. May specialize in certain legal areas such as real estate, labor law, or contracts. Receives general supervision during initial and final stages of assignments, but is expected to conduct work with relative independence. Responsibility for final action is usually limited to matters covered by legal precedents and in which Idttle deviation from standard forms and practices is involved. Any decisions or actions having a bearing on the company's business are reviewed by a superior.

IV. Responsible for a broad legal area in which assignments 6-014 cover a wide range of difficult and complex legal questions and problems. Primarily, serves in an advisory capacity, making studies and developing opinions which may have an important bearing on the conduct of the company's business (e.g., recommending action to protect the company's trade-marks and copyrights in foreign countries). Receives & minimm of technical legal supervision.

. V. Plans, conducts, and supervises legal assignments within one 6-01-5 or more broad legal areas. Supervises & staff of attorneys, with responsibility for evaluating their performance and approving recommendations which may have an important bearing on the conduct of the company's business.

VI. As General Counsel or Chief Attorney for a company, provides 6-01-6 top management with authoritative counsel as to the meaning and application of pertinent law (federal, state, local, or international law) to company activities or planned activities. Personally, or through his state, represents the company in all legal matters such as contractual negotiations, real estate matters, Hability cases, patents, investments, mergers, etc., including the trial of cases in courts. Directs the activities of a start of attorneys and/or coordinates and generally oversees the work of private law firms engaged to represent the company on specific subjects. Has a significant role in the top policy councils of company management regarding all aspects of the company's activities.'

REVISION OF MAJOR FEDERAL STATUTORY SALARY

SYSTEMS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1962

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
COMMITTEE ON Post OFFICE AND CIVIL SERVICE,

Washington, D.C. The committee met, pursuant to notice, at 10 a.m., in room 215, House Office Building, Washington, D.C., Hon. James H. Morrison (acting chairman), presiding.

Mr. MORRISON. The committee will come to order, please.

This morning we shall resume hearings on legislation pending before the House Post Office and Civil Service Committee to provide pay increases for postal and other Federal employees.

On May 8 the committee received testimony from the Chairman of the Civil Service Commission, Hon. John Macy, and the Deputy Director of the Bureau of the Budget, Hon. Elmer Staats.

This morning it is our pleasure to hear from the able and distinguished Post master General of the United States, Hon. J. Edward Day, who is accompanied by the Assistant Postmaster General for Personnel, Hon. Richard Murphy, and Hon. Herbert Block, Director, Compensation Division, Bureau of Personnel.

Mr. Day, will you proceed, and I would like to ask the committee, if they will, to let the Post master General proceed with his statement first, and then we will open the proceedings for questioning. However, that does not mean if some point comes up that you want to ask a question on that you are not at liberty to ask a question. But I think for the sake of time and in order to expedite the business of the committee it would be better, if possible, to permit the witness to complete his statement, followed by questions.

Mr. Postmaster General, will you proceed, please!

STATEMENT OF HON. J. EDWARD DAY, POSTMASTER GENERAL

Mr. Day. Thank you, Mr. Morrison. My statement is rather brief. Mr. Murphy has a supplemental statement which goes into greater details, and while I do not like to take up too much time of the committee in the preliminary statements, this is the first time we will have presented the complete story on the postal aspects of this plan, and since there are so many complexities and special considerations for the postal field service people we feel that we should get the whole story before the committee.

I would also like to introduce as being with us today Mrs. Anne Flory, who is Assistant Director of the Compensation Division. She

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