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LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF THE EQUAL
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY ACT OF 1972

(H.R. 1746, P.L. 92-261)

AMENDING TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS

ACT OF 1964

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Por sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $11.25 paper covers

Stock Number 5270-01 629

COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE

HARRISON A. WILLIAMS, JR., New Jersey, Chairman JENNINGS RANDOLPH, West Virginia JACOB K. JAVITS, New York CLAIBORNE PELL, Rhode Island

PETER H. DOMINICK, Colorado EDWARD M. KENNEDY, Massachusetts RICHARD S. SCHWEIKER, Pennsylvan GAYLORD NELSON, Wisconsin

BOB PACKWOOD, Oregon WALTER F. MONDALE, Minnesota

ROBERT TAFT, JR., Ohio THOMAS F. EAGLETON, Missouri

J. GLENN BEALL, JR., Maryland
ALAN CRANSTON, California

ROBERT T. STAFFORD, Vermont
HAROLD E. HUGHES, Iowa
ADLAI E. STEVENSON III, Illinois

STEWART E. MCCLURE, Staff Director

ROBERT E. NAGLE, General Counsel
ROY H. MILLENSON, Minority Staff Director

EUGENE MITTELMAN, Minority Counsel

SUBOOMMITTEE ON LABOR

HARRISON A. WILLIAMS, JR., New Jersey, Chairman JENNINGS RANDOLPH, West Virginia JACOB K. JAVITS, New York CLAIBORNE PELL, Rhode Island

RICHARD S. SCHWEIKER, Pennsylvan GAYLORD NELSON, Wisconsin

BOB PACKWOOD, Oregon THOMAS F. EAGLETON, Missouri

ROBERT TAFT, JR., Ohio ADLAI E. STEVENSON III, Illinois

ROBERT T. STAFFORD, Vermont
HAROLD E. HUGHES, Iowa

GERALD M. FEDER, Counsel
DONALD ELISBURG, A88ociate Counsel
EUGENE MITTELMAN, Minority Labor Counsel

(II)

FOREWORD

rapia

The Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972 marked the cul-
mination of a 30-year effort to provide the Federal Government with
the authority needed to bring an end to employment discrimination
in our society. The first step in this effort was the passage of the Civil
Rights Act of 1964. Title VII of that act created the Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity Commission which was charged with ending un-
lawful employment practices based on race, color, religion, sex, or
national origin. However, under title VII the Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission was made a conciliation agency with enforce-
ment of employment discrimination cases given on a limited basis to
the Department of Justice or left to private individuals.

The experience of 7 years under title VII reflected its serious defect
in the lack of enforcement authority. For more than 6 years efforts
were made in the Congress to give EEOC the needed enforcement
powers. In each succeeding Congress after 1964 bills were introduced
but in the face of strong opposition there was never successful
enactment.
The passage of this act in this Congress will give new hope to mil-
lions of Americans who have been the victims of discrimination. Pas-
sage came only after a long struggle involving extended debate in the
Senate for several months. The bill that was finally enacted represents
in some respects a compromise from the original proposals. However
the final product provides the Equal Employment Opportunity Com-
mission, and the Civil Service Commission with respect to Federal
employees, the tools needed to implement an effective enforcement
program to secure equal employment opportunity for all our citizens.

Enforcement of this law will undoubtedly raise many questions
regarding the congressional intent behind its various provisions. To
aid those who will be responsible for such enforcement, and the public
to which the law's requirements and protection will apply, I have
asked the committee staff to compile this legislative history, with the
assistance of Mr. George Sape of the Equal Employment Opportu-
nity Commission. This compilation will be of considerable benefit also
to the Congress and, particularly, to the members of the Committee on
Labor and Public Welfare, in their continuing legislative review of
this act's administration.

HARRISON A. WILLIAMS, Jr.,

Chairman.

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