Elements of History, Ancient and Modern

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Brown & Taggard, 1849 - History - 408 pages

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Page 211 - For all which treasons and crimes this Court doth adjudge that he, the said Charles Stuart, as a tyrant, traitor, murderer, and public enemy to the good people of this nation, shall be put to death by the severing of his head from his body.
Page 214 - You are no longer a Parliament : I tell you, you are no longer a Parliament. The Lord has done with you : he has chosen other instruments for carrying on his work.
Page 129 - The wild exploits of those romantic knights who sallied forth in quest of adventures, are well known, and have been treated with proper ridicule. The political and permanent effects of the spirit of chivalry have been less observed.
Page 114 - If these writings of the Greeks agree with the book of God, they are useless, and need not be preserved; if they disagree, they are pernicious, and ought to be destroyed.
Page 281 - Congress, was composed of 55 members, most of whom were men of distinguished character and talents. They published a declaration of the rights of the Colonies ; agreed to suspend all commercial intercourse with Great Britain ; and- drew up an address to the king, another to the people of Great Britain, and a third to the Colonies. These able state papers were highly applauded by Lord Chatham in the British parliament. 20. The disparity between the two contending parties was immense. Great Britain...
Page 87 - After having arrived at sovereign power, he engaged in some successful military enterprises ; but the general character of his reign was pacific : he cherished the arts of peace, embellished the city, erected public edifices, pursued the policy of maintaining order and tranquillity throughout his vast empire, and the temple of Janus was now shut for the first time since the commencement of the second Punic war, and only the third time from the foundation of the city. 4. Augustus died in the 76th...
Page 318 - On the 24th he issued his proclamation declaring that " hostilities have been commenced by the United States, in making new conquests upon our territories within the boundaries of Tamaulipas and New Leon. I have not the right to declare war." * The same day General Arista informed General Taylor that he " considered hostilities commenced, and should prosecute them.
Page 134 - Charlemagne affords a solitary restingplace between two long periods of turbulence and ignominy, deriving the advantages of contrast both from...
Page 185 - Becket, while he was chancellor of the kingdom, will afford some idea of the rude state of the arts. Nobody, it is said by contemporary writers, equalled him in refinement and splendor. " Every day, in winter, his apartments were strewed with clean straw or hay, and in summer, with rushes or leaves, that those who came to pay their court to him, might not soil their fine clothes by sitting on a dirty floor.
Page 69 - O, with what ease could I conquer the world, had I the Romans for soldiers, or had they me for their king !" 14. In the progress of the war, Fabri'cius, who afterwards commanded the Roman army, received a letter from the physician of Pyr'rhus, importing that for a proper reward he would poison the king. Fabri'cius, indignant at so base a proposal, gave immediate information of it to Pyr'rhus, who, admiring the generosity of his enemy, exclaimed ; " It is easier to turn the sun from his course, than...

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