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the court's decision to confiscate his property as well as his publishing copyrights was seen as additional justification.15 At the end of the war crimes trials, the collection was shipped from Europe to Alexandria, Virginia, and on March 31, 1962, it was transferred to the Audiovisual Archives Division of the National Archives.

The Hoffmann collection, about ninety cubic feet of photographs, can be found in the National Archives in Record Group 242, National Archives Collection of Foreign Records Seized, 1941. The material covers the years from before World War I to 1944. The collection is incomplete because a portion was left behind in Berlin in 1945.16

15 Wolfe to NM and NC, Nov. 18, 1965.

16 H. E. Potter to E. M. Harris, July 18, 1949, Hoffmann File.

There are approximately forty thousand glass negatives ranging in size from 214 by 31/4 inches to 7 by 91/2 inches. These negatives are divided into eleven series (with the designations B, BA, F, D, K, MA, MC, MR, PKTA, PKTC, and WO) grouped according to glass size. Only a very rough subject organization exists except for the MR series which consists of portraits of National Socialist members of the 1933 Reichstag.

The Hoffmann collection also includes 132 albums (6,600 pages) containing 7,117 positive Leica film strips. There are about 217,800 photographs in this part of the collection. Only a small portion of the negatives for these prints are included in the holdings of the National Archives. For the most part, the Leica albums are organized by date; however, notable exceptions are albums on the Olympic games of 1936, Nuremberg party rallies of 1929 and 1934 through 1938, the Spanish Civil War, and six albums taken at the Führer's headquarters between 1940 and 1944. Like the glass negatives, the Leica albums are given a serial designation B (Berlin) or M (Munich) to indicate the Hoffmann office in which the pictures were registered. The subject albums mentioned above were constructed from the B and M series and for all practical purposes have the separate designations of their subject matter.

The war destroyed all the written records of the collection. At the end of the war Heinrich Hoffmann, Jr., reconstructed the files from memory, but he was not permitted to complete his project and these finding aids are of limited value. Shelf lists of a general nature exist for most of the series of photographs, and a name index and a chronological index were created for the 132 albums of Leica strips. The staff of the National Archives is presently preparing a subject index to the BA, MA, and MR series related to the early years of the Nazi party. Hopefully this index will make the Hoffmann collection more available and useful to the public.

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