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also the United States and the whole free world.

The present Mutual Security Program has grown, by evolutionary steps, from our first postwar efforts to bring relief from the destruction of World War II. Today it combines our major efforts to win a global struggle against totalitarianism and misery.

It is appropriate and desirable for the new administration and the Congress to review the Mutual Security Program Any program that occupies such a cen. tral part of our foreign policy structure, that requires such a large investment of our resources, that affects so many people in so many ways, should be so rtviewed as matter of course.

The rapid pace of events would itself require a reevaluation at this time to determine the appropriateness of the timing, the scope, and the emphasis of the Mutual Security Program. Without seeking to influence such a review, it may be helpful to the new administration and the Congress to indicate what appear to me to be several basic considerations to be taken into account.

We know that the men now in the Kremlin are the center of a vast conspiracy whose inexorable purpose is to blot out human freedoms throughout the world because those who direct this conspiracy deny the worth of the individual human being and despise the concept of human dignity. It is clear that the threat directed against us is simultaneously military, economic, political, and psychological; that it might move more aggressively with any or several of these weapons in any number of places at any time; and that a prime objective of current Soviet strategy is to split the free world and especially to destroy the unity of the western alliance, that it may divide and conquer.

Clearly we cannot undertake to do all of the things that we should like to do to meet and overcome this threat everywhere and simultaneously. In the end certain choices have to be made-hard choices based on the best judgment we can bring to bear as to how we shall allocate our great but not unlimited resources between use at home and use abroad, between use in various areas of the world, and between various types of programs designed primarily to strengthen our defenses, strengthen the free-world economies, or strengthen the political and social forces that are working generally for the preservation and extension of freedom.

We must face the existence of a major military threat and the consequent economic burdens of rearmament and yet we must also continue to strengthen our economies and to help build sound political and social institutions upon which free societies rest; we must honor our military commitments in the Far East and recognize the military problems in other parts of the world and yet we must also preserve in our pursuit of military security in the North Atlantic area; we, must be prepared to cope with unpredictable crises and yet we must design and administer our programs with a view to the long pull ahead.

There is no longer any responsible body of opinion in the United States that questions the rightness of the concept of mutual security in the free world nor of the need for American leadership and the investment of American resources in this common enterprise. The questions that arise concern mainly the relationship of the Mutual Security Program to our over-all political, military, and economic policies; the magnitude of the program; the proper balance between military. economic, and technical assistance that should apply within the program; the proper emphasis of effort by geographic area; and choices involved between the relatively short-term results and the relatively long-term results that we are seeking.

There are three aspects of these difficult problems which I think should be given particular attention:

1. The Mutual Security Program must be viewed within the framework of foreign and national security policy as a whole and tailored so as to provide the maximum support to that policy. This requires a grasp of complex interrelationships. We must understand that the requirements of our own Armed Forces have to be related to the requirements of the armed forces of our friends and allies, based upon a recognition that the security of the United States depends upon strong military defenses beyond our shores. We must recognize that the need for assistance has to be tied to achievement of stated foreign policy objectives-for example, the ability of France to sustain the military burden of war in Indochina directly affects her position in the North Atlantic Alliance and the progress of the European Defense Community. We must realize that the development of strong economic and social institutions in the free world is dependent upon increased productivity and economic growth in the underdeveloped areas. In particular, we must appreciate the relationship between our foreign economic policies and our domestic economic policies which are, in fact, so closely interrelated as to be, for most practical purposes, inseparable. Fluctuations in the general level of business activity in this country can have a profound impact on the economies of other nations, the continued expansion of our own industrial economy depends directly upon increased production abroad of essential raw materials; the role of United States private investment abroad and United States public loan policies affect the ability of other countries to develop and become independent of United States aid; our tariff policies and customs procedures have a great deal to do with the ability of other nations to earn their own way in the dollar markets. All these factors act and react on each other. If we are to make the greatest possible progress and the most effective use of our resources, all of our policies and programs foreign and domestic-must be internally consistent and must mutually support each other.

2. Programs to help build collective strength in the free world can no longer be considered as emergency measures,

but as essential to the security of the United States in the cold war struggle which may be with us for a long time. We have a great stake in maintaining strong economies and strong defenses among the nations of the free world and for some time to come this will require assistance on the part of the United States. As for the underdeveloped areas of the free world, economic development and technical assistance programs are long-range by nature.

The time has come to stop thinking about mutual defense and foreign economic programs as stopgap measures and to think about them as activities which for the sake of our own security require considerable forward planning. I do not mean to suggest that grants from this Government should continue indefinitely. But so long as there is need for any aid, there will also be need for careful planning on a longer and more consistent basis than has been provided by our traditional process of annual appropriations. We must work out measures which will enable longer range planning than is now possible, without impairing the proper responsibilities of the Congress for appropriating funds and overseeing their expenditure.

We must all realize that the Mutual Security Program is a joint endeavor requiring substantial contributions by each and every partner, because the program is directed at objectives in which all participants have a large common interest. For our sake and for our partners' sake, it will be desirable to develop a longer range approach than the 1-year review and renewal of our programs which has been the practice since the end of the Marshall plan.

3. We need to examine anew our programs in the underdeveloped areas. It has become increasingly clear that the steady but slow contributions from technical asssitance must be complemented, in one form or another, by capital development. Funds are needed to help the underdeveloped countries build such key facilities as dams, power plants, and transport, and to increase the production of basic commodities raw materials and food—which are essential to the achievement of an expanding freeworld economy, including our own.

There are several other aspects of the Mutual Security Program that warrant study and possible adjustment. For example, we need to find methods to expedite delivery of end-item military equipment and to achieve the optimum volume of offshore procurement. Naturally, the essential requirements of Korea and other active combat areas must first be satisfied. But, beyond this, in allocating military equipment, we must hold to the principle that those who may be called upon to fight first should be adequately equipped first. The armed forces of our allies in Europe and in critical areas in other parts of the world are manning the frontiers of freedom. We will be sa ificing a substantial measure of our own security if we do not see to it that these forces are speedily and adequately equipped.

REPORT ON FREIGHT-FORWARDING

ACTIVITIES The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Secretary of Commerce, transmitting, pursuant to law, the twenty-third report of action taken by the United States Maritime Administration on coordination of forwarding and similar servicing of water-borne export and import foreign commerce of the United States, for the period September 1, to December 31, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

With respect to offshore procurement, we need to recognize that the development of a production base abroad is essential if the free world is to have the necessary equipment and supplies should war come and if our friends and allies are to be in a position ultimately to assume responsibility for their own defense. Mutual security funds must be so directed as to assure achievement of this basic security objective.

We need to keep constantly in mind the crucial fact that the end objective of mutual security arrangements is the preservation and strengthening of freeworld unity. The essential unity of aims and major policies of the western alliance is so steadfast that we can afford to disagree over details and methods. This, in fact, is the basic strength of a democratic relationship that we each have views and express them and then work out our differences. But we must be forever alert to the certain efforts that will be made by the Kremlin to seize these differences and exploit them as issues, to convince our friends and allies that they have lost their independence and that the United States is using the lever of "aid" to coerce its allies into fol. lowing policies and programs unilaterally laid down in Washington. The donor-recipient relationship—the suggestion of charity-implicit in the term "foreign aid" is psychologically unhealthy. It is well known that this has caused increasing anxiety on the part of some of our allies. We may regard this às a welcome sign of independence and vitality on the part of people who rightly resent any suggestion of United States dominance over their own affairs. The term “foreign aid" is obsolete, unsound and unworthy as a conceptual basis for the great ventures in international partnership upon which we are engaged. As partners in a free association of independent nations we have grown in strength and unity. As such—but only as such can we find together still greater strength and greater unity.

It has been our conscious purpose to maintain a high degree of flexibility in the Mutual Security Program. Such flexibility implies the need for continuing review and reevaluation by both the Congress and the executive branch. I am pleased and proud that as I leave office the Mutual Security Program is a going concern with a record of splendid accomplishment. The great forward strides toward collective defense, toward economic progress, and toward free world unity that have taken place under the Mutual Security Program will stand out as dramatic and historic accomplishments in the twentieth century struggle for peace and decency for mankind.

HARRY S. TRUMAN. THE WHITE HOUSE, January 16, 1953. LAWS PASSED BY MUNICIPAL COUNCIL OF ST.

CROIX, V. I. The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate communication from the Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior, transmitting, pursuant to law, copies of laws enacted by the Municipal Council of St. Croix, V. I.; which, with

the accompanying papers, was referred to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. REPORT OF UNITED STATES CONTRIBUTIONS

TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Secretary of State, transmitting, pursuant to law, the first report on the extent and disposition of United States contributions to international organizations, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations. DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN PROPERTY BY DEPART

MENT OF STATE The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Secretary of State, transmitting, pursuant to law, the second report on the disposal of industrial equipment allocated to the United States as German reparations, and the disposal of foreign excess property owned by or in the custody of the Department of State, for the period January 1, 1950, to June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Government Operations. ANNUAL REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN OF

CONGRESS The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Librarian of Congress, transmitting, pursuant to law, the Annual Report of the Library of Congress, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Rules and Administration.

ANNUAL REPORT OF SELECTIVE SERVICE

SYSTEM The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Director of the Selective Service System, transmitting, pursuant to law, the second annual report of the operations of the System, for the fisc year ended June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Com. mittee on Armed Services.

ANNUAL REPORT OF FARM CREDIT

ADMINISTRATION The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, transmitting, pursuant to law, the Annual Report of the Farm Credit Administration, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry. CORRECTED REPORT OF FLIGHT PAY OF CER

TAIN AIR FORCE OFFICERS The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid befor the Senate a communication from the Director, Legislation and Liaison, Department of the Air Force, transmitting a corrected report of the average monthly flight pay of officers above the rank of major for the period March 1 to August 31, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Armed Services. TEMPORARY ADMISSION OF ALIEN SEAMEN

The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Attorney General, transmitting, pur. suant to law, a report on the temporary admission into the United States of alien seamen for shore leave purposes only; which, with the accompanying paper, was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. ANNUAL REPORT OF AGRICULTURAL

CONSERVATION PROGRAM The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, transmitting, pursuant to law, the annual report of operations, expenditures, and obligations under the Soil Conservation and Domestic Allotment Act for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry. REPORT OF MISSOURI RIVER BASIN PROGRAM

The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, transmitting a letter of comment from the Department of Commerce on the Department of Agriculture's supplemental report to the Missouri River Basin agricultural program; which, with the accompanying paper, was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry.

RELIEF OF MRS. LENNIE P. RIGGS, JAMES A.

CARSON, AND VERNON L. RANSOM The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Postmaster General, transmitting a draft of proposed legislation for the relief of Mrs. Lennie P. Riggs, James A. Carson, and Vernon L. Ransom; which, with the accompanying paper, was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. ANNUAL REPORT OF FEDERAL COMMUNICA

TIONS COMMISSION The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, transmitting, pursuant to law, the annual report of the Commission, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

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REPORT OF INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION

AND EDUCATIONAL EXCHANGE PROGRAM The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Secretary of State, transmitting, pursuant to law, the ninth semiannual report on the International Information and Educational Exchange Program, for the period January 1 to June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

SNAKE RIVER RECLAMATION PROJECT The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Secretary of the Interior, transmitting a draft of proposed legislation to authorize the construction, operation, and maintenance of the initial phase of the Snake River reclamation project; which, with the accompanying paper, was referred to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Armed Services. REPORT OF LAND ACQUISITIONS BY NATIONAL

CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the executive officer of the National Capital Planning Commission, transmitting, pursuant to law, the annual report of land acquisitions for parks, parkways, and playgrounds for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE

TREASURY The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Secretary of the Treasury, transmitting, pursuant to law, his annual report on the state of finances for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Finance. RESTORATION AND DISPOSITION OF SHIPS

The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the General Counsel of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, transmitting a draft of proposed legislation to provide for the restoration and maintenance of the U.S. S. Constitution and to authorize the disposition of the U. S. S. Constellation, U. S. S. Hartford, U. S. S. Olympia, and U. S. S. Oregon; which, with the accompanying paper, was referred to the Committee on Armed Services.

TRANSFER OF NAVAL VESSEL The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, pursuant to law, proposing to transfer to the town of Milford, Conn., one 420-foot retriever boat (hull No. 21191) for use in rescue and patrol work; which was referred to the Committee on Armed Services.

the year 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry. RELIEF OF TREASURY DEPARTMENT

EMPLOYEES The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, transmitting a draft of proposed legislation for the relief of certain employees of the Department of the Treasury who, while in the course of their official duties, suffered losses for personal property by reason of war conditions and whose claims for such losses have been considered and approved by the Secretary of the Treasury upon the recommendation of a Treasury Claim Board; which, with the accompanying paper, was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. CLARIFICATION OF CLASSIFICATION OF

NARCOTIC DRUGS The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, transmitting a draft of proposed legislation to clarify the classification of narcotic drugs; which, with the accompanying paper, was referred to the Committee on Finance. INCREASE IN PER DIEM ALLOWANCE OF CER

TAIN EMPLOYEES OF TREASURY DEPARTMENT

The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, transmitting a draft of proposed legislation to authorize an increase in the per diem allowance of agents assigned to the protection of the President of the United States; which, with the accompanying paper, was referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

SAFETY OF LIFE AND PROPERTY AT SEA

The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, transmitting a draft of proposed legislation to provide for greater safety of life and property at sea by authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury to prescribe rules for the loading, stowage, and securing of grain and other similar bulk cargoes; which, with the accompanying paper, was referred to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce. ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES IN TREASURY

DEPARTMENT The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, transmitting a draft of proposed legislation to authorize certain administrative expenses in the Treasury Department; which, with the accompanying paper, was referred to the Committee

on Finance. REPORT ON PROFESSIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC

POSITIONS IN DEFENSE DEPARTMENT The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Secretary of Defense, transmitting, pursuant to law, the annual report of professional and scientific positions established in the Department of Defense for the calendar year 1952; which, with

REPORT OF MUTUAL DEFENSE ASSISTANCE

PROGRAM The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Administrator of the Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act, transmitting, pursuant to law, the second semiannual report of operations for the period July 24 to December 31, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations. CONSTRUCTION OF AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH

FACILITIES The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Director of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, transmitting a draft of proposed legislation to authorize the construction of aeronautical research facilities and the acquisition of land by the Committee necessary to the effective prosecution of aeronautical research; which, with the accompanying paper, was referred to the Committee on Armed Services. REPORT OF CONTRACTS NEGOTIATED BY

COAST GUARD FOR EXPERIMENTAL, DEVELOPMENT, OR RESEARCH WORK

The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the acting commandant of the United States Coast Guard, transmitting, pursuant to law, a report of contracts negotiated by the Coast Guard for experimental, development, or research work, for the period July 1 to December 31, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Armed Services. FLIGHT PAY OF CERTAIN NAVAL PERSONNEL

The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Secretary of the Navy, transmitting, pursuant to law, the annual report of the number of Navy officers above the rank of lieutenant commander receiving flight pay and the average monthly amount of the same, for the 6-month period ended December 31, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Armed Services. ANNUAL REPORT OF GEORGETOWN BARGE,

DOCK, ELEVATOR & RAILWAY CO. The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the president of the Georgetown Barge, Dock, Elevator & Railway Co., transmitting, pursuant to law, the annual report of the operations of the company for the calendar year 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

ANNUAL REPORT OF RURAL ELECTRIFICATION

ADMINISTRATION The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, transmitting, pursuant to law, the Annual Report of the Administrator of the Rural Electrification Administration, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry. ANNUAL REPORT OF FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE

CORPORATION The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, transmitting, pursuant to law, the annual report on the operations of the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation for

United States Army, on a review of report on the Columbia River between Chinook, Wash., and the head of Sand Island, with a view to determining if any modification of the existing project is advisable at this time; which, with the accompanying papers, was referred to the Committee on Public Works and ordered to be printed with an illustration.

CHANGE OF REFERENCE

On motion by Mr. MILLIKIN, and by unanimous consent,

The Committee on Finance was discharged from the further consideration of the bill (S. 441), to prohibit the procurement for the Armed Forces of any article produced in, or imported from, Communist-controlled countries, and it was referred to the Committee on Armed Services.

REPORT OF AUDIT OF ACCOUNTS OF FUTURE

FARMERS OF AMERICA The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the chairman of the Future Farmers of América, transmitting, pursuant to law, a report on the audit of the accounts of the Future Farmers of America for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. ANNUAL REPORT OF SECRETARY OF

COMMERCE The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Secretary of Commerce, transmitting, pursuant to law, his annual report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce. SUPPLEMENTARY REPORT OF WAR CLAIMS

COMMISSION The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the War Claims Commission, transmitting, pursuant to law, the supplementary report of the Commission on War Claims Arising Out of World War II; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. TORT CLAIMS PAID BY DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Secretary of Labor, transmitting, pursuant to law, a report of tort claims paid by the Department of Labor for the calendar year 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. REPORT ON DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN EXCESS

PROPERTY BY DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, transmitting, pursuant to law, a report on disposal of foreign excess property by the Department for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1952; which, with the accompanying report, was referred to the Committee on Government Operations.

PETITIONS AND MEMORIALS Mr. WILEY presented a resolution of the common council of the city of Sheboygan, Wis., favoring Federal participation in the Sheboygan harbor project; which was referred to the Committee on Public Works.

Mr. HUMPHREY presented a resolution of the tribal executive committee of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribal Council, Red Lake Band, Cass Lake, Minn., favoring certain congressional appropriations; which was referred to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

PARTIAL REPORT ON INVESTIGATION OF AT

TORNEY AND OTHER CONTRACTS WITH INDIANS

Mr. ANDERSON, from the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, submitted a partial report (No. 8) of an investigation of attorney and other contracts with Indians, with the individual views of Mr. LEHMAN; which was ordered to be printed. INTRODUCTION OF BILLS AND JOINT

RESOLUTIONS Bills and joint resolutions were introduced by unanimous consent, severally read the first and second times and referred, as follows:

By Mr. CAPEHART: S. 470. A bill for the relief of Julia Ann Smith; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

S. 471. A bill to amend the Fair Labor Standards Act, by clarifying the definition of "employee," and for other purposes; to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare.

By Mr. CAPEHART (for himself,

Mr. JOHNSON of Colorado, Mr.
JENNER, Mr. MAYBANK, Mr. ROB-
ERTSON, Mr. DOUGLAS, Mr. IVES,
Mr. BRICKER, Mr. WILLIAMS, Mr.
WATKINS, Mr. MARTIN, Mr. SAL-

TONSTALL, and Mr. FREAR): S. 472. A bill to amend section 403 (b) of the Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938 so as to permit the granting of free or reduced-rate transportation to ministers of religion; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

By Mr. GRISWOLD (for himself,

Mr. BUTLER of Nebraska, Mr.
BARRETT, Mr. CARLSON, Mr. CASE,
Mr. GILLETTE, Mr. HICKENLOOP-
ER, Mr. HUNT, Mr. JOHNSON of
Colorado, Mr. MUNDT, and Mr.

SCHOEPPEL): S. 473. A bill to amend the Defense Production Act of 1950, as amended, to prohibit the grading of livestock and to remove price ceilings from livestock; to the Committee on Banking and Currency.

By Mr. ROBERTSON: S. 474. A bill for the relief of Maria Yutriago; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. JOHNSTON of South

Carolina: S. 475. A bill to amend the National Housing Act, as amended; to the Committee on Banking and Currency.

By Mr. FERGUSON: S. 476. A bill to grant succession to the War Damage Corporation; to the Committee on Banking and Currency.

S. 477. A bill for the relief of PalmerBee Co.; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. YOUNG: S. 478. A bill to amend the Agricultural Act of 1949, as amended, so as to provide permanent price support for oats, rye, and barley at 90 percent of parity; to the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry.

S. 479. A bill for the relief of Mrs. Frank McLaughlin Countryman; and

S. 480. A bill for the relief of Tryfon Papageorge; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. YOUNG (for himself and

Mr. RUSSELL): S. 481. A bill to amend the Agricultural Act of 1949, as amended, so as to extend for three additional years the requirement that prices of basic agricultural commodities be supported at 90 percent of parity; to the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry.

By Mr. CLEMENTS: S. 482. A bill for the relief of Jean Tokuda; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. MILLIKIN: S. 483. A bill for the relief of Miss Elvira Bortolin; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. MILLIKIN (for himself

and Mr. JOHNSON of Colorado); S. 484. A bill for the relief of J. Don Alexander; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. GOLDWATER (for himself

and Mr. HAYDEN); S. 485. A bill to terminate Federal discriminations against the Indians of Arizona; to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

By Mr. ELLENDER: S. 486. A bill for the relief of Che Kil Bok; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. LEHMAN S. 487. A bill for the relief of Dr. Theodore A. Balourdas; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. MAGNUSON: S. 488. A bill for the relief of George Takehara; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. BUSH: S. 489. A bill to direct the Secretary of the Army to convey certain land located in Windsor Locks, Conn., to the State of Connecticut; to the Committee on Armed Services.

S. 490. A bill for the relief of Josephine Reigl;

S. 491. A bill for the relief of Dr. Dimi. tri Alexandrovich Afonsky;

S. 492. A bill for the relief of Ruth Scott-Wood; and

S. 493. A bill for the relief of Edward Ting-Ho Tan, Patricia Woo Tan, and Ed

REPORT OF CHIEF OF ENGINEERS ON COLUMBIA

RIVER Mr. MARTIN presented a communication from the Acting Secretary of the Army, addressed to the chairman of the Committee on Public Works, transmitting a report of the Chief of Engineers,

ward Hung-Chi Tan; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. SMATHERS: S. 494. A bill to permit deduction for income-tax purposes of certain expenses incurred by widows in providing care for their children while they are at work; to the Committee on Finance.

By Mr. HENNINGS: S. 495. A bill for the relief of Yee Kee Lam; and

S. 496. A bill for the relief of Dr. Samson Sol Flores and his wife, the former Cecelia T. Tolentino; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

S. 497. A bill providing for the construction of a highway and appurtenances thereto, traversing the Mississippi Valley; to the Committee on Public Works.

By Mr. HAYDEN (for himself and

Mr. GOLDWATER): S. 498. A bill to authorize an agreement between the United States and Mexico for the joint operation and maintenance by the International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico, of the Nogales sanitation project, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

S. 499. A bill to promote the rehabilitation of the Papago Tribe of Indians and a better utilization of the resources of the Papago Tribe, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

By Mr. LANGER: S. 500. A bill to amend the District of Columbia Traffic Act, 1925, so as to require that motor vehicles operated for pleasure purposes in the District of Columbia by minors licensed to drive in the District of Columbia shall carry emblems or devices calling attention to the fact that such motor vehicles are being operated by minors; to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

S. 501. A bill to amend section 6 of the act of August 24, 1912, as amended, with respect to the recognition of organizations of postal and Federal employees; to the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service.

S. 502. A bill for the relief of Mrs. Margareth Weigand;

S. 503. A bill for the relief of Gerdina Josephina Van Delft;

S. 504. A bill for the relief of Wilhelm Fritz Rathjens;

S. 505. A bill for the relief of Rev. John T. MacMullen;

S. 506. A bill for the relief of Horst F. W. Dittmar and Heinz-Erik Dittmar;

S. 507. A bill for the relief of Mrs. Eleanor Emilie Nell;

S. 508. A bill for the relief of Alfred Theodor Ex; and

S. 509. A bill to confer jurisdiction upon the United States Court of Claims to hear, determine, and render judgment upon claims of customs officers and employees to extra compensation for Sunday, holiday, and overtime services performed after August 31, 1931, and not heretofore paid in accordance with existing law; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. DIRKSEN: S. 510. A bill to provide that the tax on admissions shall not apply to admissions to a moving-picture theater;

S. 511. A bill to establish a Commission on the Public Debt of the United States; and

S. 512. A bill to amend the penalty provisions, applicable to persons convicted of violating certain narcotic laws, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Finance.

S. 513. A bill for the relief of the Lake States Engineering Co.;

S. 514. A bill for the relief of John David Burk (Yutaka Iwao);

S. 515. A bill for the relief of Ami Kanagaki and her child;

S. 516. A bill for the relief of Ronald Lee Oenning;

S. 517. A bill for the relief of M. Roman Decker;

S. 518. A bill for the relief of Sister Marie Therese De Galzain;

S. 519. A bill for the relief of Stephania Ziegler (Sister Benitia), Anna Hagel (Sister Klara), and Theresia Tuppinger (Sister Romana);

S. 520. A bill for the relief of Mr, and Mrs. Ivan S. Aylesworth;

S. 521. A bill to amend title 18, United States Code, regarding published articles and broadcasts by foreign agents;

S. 522. A bill for the relief of George F. Ruckman; and

S. 523. A bill to provide for extension of terms of patents where the use, exploitation, or promotion thereof was prevented, impaired, or delayed by causes due to war, national emergency, or other causes; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

S. 524. A bill to authorize the release of the personnel files of Federal officers and employees to congressional committees at the request of such officers and employees; to the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service.

S. 525. A bill to amend section 7 (h) of the Natural Gas Act; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

By Mr. HENDRICKSON (for

himself, Mrs. SMITH of Maine,
Mr. SMITH of New Jersey, Mr.
SCHOEPPEL, Mr. WILLIAMS, Mr.
HUNT, Mr. HICKENLOOPER, Mr.
CARLSON, Mr. TOBEY, Mr. IVES,

and Mr. SALTONSTALL): S. 526. A bill to establish a Natioanl Commission on Intergovernmental Relations; to the Committee on Government Operations.

By Mr. SMITH of New Jersey

(for himself and Mr. HENDRICK

SON); S. 527. A bill to provide that compensation of a Federal officer or employee shall be subject to State tax only in the State where he is domiciled, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Finance.

By Mr. ANDERSON: S. 528. A bill to amend section 1 of the act approved June 27, 1947 (61 Stat. 189); to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

By Mr. MONRONEY (for himself

and Mr. KERR): S. 529. A bill to provide for the conveyance of certain land to the State of

Oklahoma for the use and benefit of the Eastern Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College at Wilburton, Okla., and for other purposes; to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

By Mr. HUMPHREY: S. 530. A bill for the relief of the city of Winona; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. ANDERSON: S. 531. A bill relating to the release of water from the Elephant Butte Reservoir, N. Mex.; to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

By Mr. BEALL: S. 532. A bill for the relief of Guiglio Squillari, Mrs. Barbero Margiorina Squillari, Kosanna Squillari, and Eugenio Squillari; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

S. 533. A bill to provide for renewal of and adjustment of compensation under contracts for carrying mail on water routes; to the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service.

By Mr. MORSE: S. 534. A bill to assure to all persons within the District of Columbia full and equal rights in places of public education, accommodation, resort, entertainment and amusement, and for other purposes; to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

By Mr. HUMPHREY (for himself,

Mr. DOUGLAS, Mr. LEHMAN, Mr.
MAGNUSON, Mr. MORSE, Mr. MUR-
RAY, Mr. NEELY, and Mr. Pas-

TORE) : S. 535. A bill to establish a Commission on Civil Rights in the Executive Branch of the Government; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. HUMPHREY: S. 536. A bill to authorize grants to the States for public elementary and secondary school construction; and

S. 537. A bill to improve and extend the duration of Public Law 874 of the Eighty-first Congress, to extend the period during which appropriations may be made to pay entitlements under title II of Public Law 815 of the Eighty-first Congress, to provide temporary supplementary aid for schools in critical defense housing areas, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare.

By Mr. CAPEHART: S. J. Res. 21. Joint resolution authorizing the President of the United States of America to proclaim October 11, 1953, General Pulaski's Memorial Day for the observance and commemoration of the death of Brig. Gen. Casimir Pulaski; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. LANGER: S. J. Res. 22. Joint resolution to designate the lake to be formed by the waters impounded by the Dickinson Dam in the State of North Dakota as "Edward Arthur Patterson Lake"; to the Committee on Public Works.

By Mr. DIRKSEN: S. J. Res. 23. Joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States relative to taxes on incomes, inheritances, and gifts; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

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