Page images
PDF
EPUB

commander of a unified command will unmistakably be from the President to the Secretary of Defense to the designated civilian Secretary of a military department. This arrangement will fix responsibility along a definite channel of accountable civilian officials as intended by the National Security Act.

It will be understood, however, that, for the strategic direction and operational control of forces, and for the conduct of combat operations, the military chief of the designated military department will be authorized by the Secretary of Defense to receive and transmit reports and orders and to act for that department in its executive agency capacity. This arrangement will make it always possible to deal promptly with emergency or wartime situations. The military chief will clearly be acting in the name and by the direction of the Secretary of Defense. Promulgated orders will directly state that fact.

By taking this action to provide clearer lines of responsibility and authority for the exercise of civilian control, I believe we will make significant progress toward increasing proper accountability in the top levels of the Departments of Defense.

Our second major objective is effectiveness with economy. Although the American people, throughout their his"tory, have hoped to avoid supporting large military forces, today we must obviously maintain a strong military force to ward off attack, at a moment's notice, by enemies equipped with the most devastating weapons known to modern science. This need for immediate preparedness makes it all the more imperative to see that the Nation maintains effective military forces in the manner imposing the minimum burden on the national economy.

In an organization the size of the Department of Defense, true effectiveness with economy can be attained only by decentralization of operations, under flexible and effective direction and control from the center. I am impressed with the determination of the Secretary of Defense to administer the Department on this basis and to look to the Secretaries of the three military departments as his principal agents for the management and direction of the entire defense enterprise,

Such a system of decentralized operations, however, requires, for sound management, flexible machinery at the top. Unfortunately, this is not wholly possible in the Department of Defense as now established by law. The principal fields of activity are rigidly assigned by law to unwieldy boards which, no matter how much authority may be centralized in their respective chairmen, provide organizational arrangements too slow and too clumsy to serve as effective management tools for the Secretary. In addition, other staff agencies have been set up in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and their functions prescribed by law, thus making it difficult for the Secretary to adjust his staff arrange

ments to deal with new problems as they arise, or to provide for flexible cooperation among the several staff agencies.

Accordingly, I am transmitting today to the Congress a reorganization plan which is designed to provide the Secretary of Defense with a more efficient staff organization. The plan calls for the abolition of the Munitions Bɔard, the Research and Development Board, the Defense Supply Management Agency, and the office of Director of Installations and vests their functions in the Secretary of Defense. At the same time, the plan authorizes the appointment of new Assistant Secretaries of Defense to whom the Secretary of Defense intends to assign the functions now vested in the agencies to be abolished and certain other functions now assigned to other officials. Specifically, the reorganization plan provides for six additional Assistant Secretaries—three to whom the Secretary will assign the duties now performed by the two Boards—based on a redistribution of staff functions_two who will be utilized to replace individual officials who presently hold other titles, and one to be assigned to a position formerly but no longer filled by an Assistant Secretary. The new Assistant Secretary positions are required in order to make it possible to bring executives of the highest type to the Goverment service and to permit them to operate effectively and with less personnel than at present. In addition, the plan also provides that in view of the importance of authoritative legal opinions and interpretations the office of General Counsel be raised to a statutory position with rank substantially equivalent to that of an Assistant Secretary.

The abolition of the present statutory staff agencies and the provision of the new Assistant Secretaries to aid the Secretary of Defense will be the key to the attainment of increased effectiveness at low cost in the Department of Defense. These steps will permit the Secretary to make a thorough reorganization of the nonmilitary staff agencies in his office. He will be able to establish truly effective and vigorous staff units under the leadership of the Assistant Secretaries. Each Assistant Secretary will function as a staff head within an assigned field of responsibility.

Without imposing themselves in the direct lines of responsibility and authority between the Secretary of Defense and the Secretaries of the three military departments, the Assistant Secretaries of Defense will provide the Secretary with a continuing review of the program of the Defense Establishment and help him institute major improvements in their execution. They will be charged with establishing systems, within their assigned fields, for obtaining complete and accurate information to support recommendations to the Secretary. The Assistant Secretaries will make frequent inspection visits to our far-flung installations and check for the Secretary the effectiveness and efficiency of operations in their assigned fields.

Other improvements are badly needed in the Departments of the Army, the

Navy, and the Air Force. Accordingly, the Secretary of Defense is initiating studies by the three Secretaries of the military departments of the internal organization of their departments with a view toward making those Secretaries truly responsible administrators, thereby obtaining greater effectiveness and attaining economies wherever possible. These studies will apply to the organization of the military departments some of the same principles of clearer lines of accountability which we are applying to the Department of Defense as a whole.

Immediate attention will also be given to studying improvements of those parts of the military departments directly concerned with the procurement and distribution of munitions and supplies and the inventory and accounting systems within each military department. We must take every step toward seeing that our Armed Forces are adequately supplied at all times with the materials essential for them to carry on their operations in the field. Necessary to this effort is a reorganization of supply machinery in the military departments. These studies of the organization of the military departments have my full support.

One other area for improved effectiveness is civilian and military personnel management. In this area certain specialized studies and actions are desirable. Accordingly, I have directed the Secretary of Defense to organize a study of the problems of attracting and holding competent career personnel-civilian and military-in the Department of Defense. As a part of this study, an examination of the Officer Personnel Act of 1947 and its practical administration will be undertaken to see if any changes are needed. I am directing that this study also include a review of statutes governing the retirement of military officers aimed at eliminating those undesirable provisions which force the early retirement of unusually capable officers who are willing to continue on active service.

The Secretary of Defense, with my approval, is issuing revised orders relating to the preparing and signing of efficiency reports for military personnel who serve full time in the Office of the Secretary, and new instructions to the military departments to guide selection boards in their operations. These actions

are aimed at giving full credit to military officers serving in the Office of the Secretary of Defense for their work for the Department of Defense as a whole. Henceforth, civilian officials who have military officers detailed to their offices, on a full-time basis will be responsible for filling out and signing the formal efficiency reports for such officers for the period of such service. In the case of officers serving in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, no other efficiency reports for such service will be maintained. The Secretary of each military department is being instructed to direct the boards convened in his department for the selection of military officers for promotion, to give the same weight to seryice in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the efficiency reports from

[ocr errors]

that Office as to service in the military department staff and to efficiency reports of departmental officers. These actions are desirable in order to reward military officers equally for service on behalf of the Department of Defense and service on the staff of a military department.

These actions and others which will be undertaken are aimed at a more effective and efficient Department of Defense; indeed, actions toward this objective will be continuous.

The impact of all these measures will be felt through the whole structure of the Department of Defense, its utilization of millions of personnel and billions of dollars. A simple token testimony to this is this fact: In the Office of the Secretary of Defense alone a staff reduction of approximately 500 persons will be effected.

Our third broad objective is to improve our machinery for strategic planning for national security. Certain actions toward this end may be taken administratively to improve the organization and procedures within the Department of Defense. Other changes are incorporated in the reorganization plan transmitted to the Congress today.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff, as provided in the National Security Act of 1947, are not a command body but are the principal military advisers to the President, the National Security Council, and the Secretary of Defense. They are responsible for formulating the strategic plans by which the United States will cope with the challenge of any enemy. The three members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff who are the military chiefs of their respective services are responsible to their Secretaries for the efficiency of their services and their readiness for war.

These officers are clearly overworked, and steps must be devised to relieve them of time-consuming details of minor importance. They must be encouraged to delegate lesser duties to reliable subordinate individuals and agencies in both the Joint Chiefs of Staff structure and in their military department staffs. One of our aims in making more effective our strategic planning machinery, therefore, is to improve the organization and procedures of the supporting staff of the Joint Chiefs of Staff so that the chiefs, acting as a body, will be better able to perform their roles as strategic planners and military advisers.

Our military plans are based primarily on military factors, but they must also take into account a wider range of policy and economic factors, as well as the latest developments of modern science. Therefore, our second aim in assuring the very best strategic planning is to broaden the degree of active participation of other persons and units at the staff level in the consideration of matters before the Joint Chiefs of Staff and to bring to bear more diversified and expert skills.

The reorganization plan transmitted to the Congress today is designed-without detracting from the military ad

visory functions of the Joint Chiefs of Staff as a group-to place upon the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff greater responsibility for organizing and directing the subordinate structure of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in such a way as to help the Secretary of Defense and the Joint Chiefs of Staff discharge their total responsibilities.

Specifically, the reorganization plan makes the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff responsible for managing the work of the Joint Staff and its Director. The Joint Staff is, of course, a studyand-reporting body serving the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The plan makes the service of the Director of the Joint Staff subject to the approval of the Secretary of Defense. It also makes the service of officers on the Joint Staff subject to the approval of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. These new responsibilities of the Chairman are in consonance with his present functions of serving as the presiding officer of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, providing agenda for meetings, assisting the Joint Chiefs of Staff to perform their duties as promptly as practicable, and keeping the Secretary of Defense and the President informed of issues before the Joint Chiefs of Staff. In addition, the proposed changes will relieve the Joint Chiefs of Staff, as a body, of a large amount of administrative detail involved in the management of its subordinate committee and staff structure.

In support of our second aim-broadened participation in strategic planning—the Secretary of Defense will direct the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to arrange for the fullest cooperation of the Joint Staff and the subcommittees of the Joint Chief of Staff with other parts of the Office of the Secretary of Defense in the early stages of staff work on any major problem. If necessary, to aid in this additional burden, an Assistant or Deputy Director of the Joint Staff will be designated to give particular attention to this staff collaboration. Thus, at the developmental stages of important staff studies by the subordinate elements of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, there will be a proper integration of the views and special skills of the other staff agencies of the Department, such as those responsible for budget, manpower, supply, research, and engineering. This action will assure the presentation of improved staff products to the Joint Chiefs of Staff for their consideration.

Also special attention will be given to providing for the participation of competent civilian scientists and engineers within the substructure of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Such participants will be able to contribute a wide range of scientific information and knowledge to our strategic planning.

Only by including outstanding civilian experts in the process of strategic planning can our military services bring new weapons rapidly into their established weapons systems, make recommendations with respect to the use of new systems of weapons in the future war plans,

and see that the whole range of scientific information and knowledge of fundamental cost factors are taken into account in strategic planning.

Taken together, the changes included in the reorganization plan and the seyeral administrative actions should go a long way toward improving the strategic planning machinery of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and lead to the development of plans based on the broadest conception of the overall national interest rather than the particular desires of the individual services.

I transmit herewith Reorganization Plan No. 6 of 1953, prepared in accordance with the Reorganization Act of 1949, as amended, and providing for reorganizations in the Department of Defense.

After investigation I have found and hereby declare that each reorganization included in Reorganization Plan No. 6 of 1953 is necessary to accomplish one or more of the purposes set forth in section 2 (a) of the Reorganization Act of 1949, as amended.

I have found and hereby declare that it is necessary to include in the accompanying reorganization plan, by reason of reorganizations made thereby, provisions for the appointment and compensation of six additional Assistant Secretaries of Defense and a General Counsel of the Department of Defense. The rates of compensation fixed for these officers are those which I have found to prevail in respect of comparable officers in the executive branch of the Government.

The statutory authority for the exercise of the function of guidance to the Munitions Board in connection with strategic and logistic plans, abolished by section 2 (d) of the reorganization plan, is section 213 (c) of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended.

The taking effect of the reorganizations included in Reorganization Plan No. 6 of 1953 is expected to result in a more effective, eficient, and economical performance of functions in the Department of Defense. It is impracticable to specify or itemize at this time the reduction of expenditures which it is probable will be brought about by such taking effect.

The Congress is a full partner in actions to strengthen our Military Establishment. Jointly we must carry forward a sound program to keep America strong. The Congress and the President, acting in their proper spheres, must perform their duties to the American people in support of our highest traditions. Should, for any reason, the national military policy become a subject of partisan politics, the only loser would be the American people.

We owe it to all the people to maintain the best Military Establishment we know how to devise. There are none, however, to whom we owe it more than the soldiers, the sailors, the marines, and the airmen in uniform whose lives are pledged to the defense of our freedom.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER.
THE WHITE HOUSE, April 30, 1953.

On motion by Mr. MCCARTHY, and by unanimous consent,

Ordered, That the message, with the accompanying plan, be referred to the Committee on Armed Services and then to the Committee on Government Operations.

ENROLLED BILL PRESENTED The Secretary reported that on today he presented to the President of the United States the enrolled bill (S. 1767) to amend and extend the provisions of the District of Columbia Emergency Act of 1951.

Senators who voted in the affirmative
are-
Aiken
Hill

Mundt
Anderson Humphrey Murray
Case
Jackson

Neely
Cooper

Johnson, Colo. Pastore
Douglas
Langer

Sparkman
Fulbright Lehman

Tobey Gore

Mansfield Wiley Green

Monroney Young Hayden

Morse Senators who voted in the negative areParrett George

McClellan Beall

Goldwater Millikin Bennett

Hendrickson Payne
Bricker

Hickenlooper Potter
Bridges
Hoey

Purtell
Bush
Holland

Saltonstall
Butler, Md.
Hunt

Schoeppel
Carlson
Ives

Smathers
Clements

Johnson, Tex. Smith, Maine Cordon

Johnston, S. C. Smith, N. C.
Daniel

Knowland Stennis
Dirksen
Kuchel

Taft
Dworshak Long

Thye
E lender
Malone

Watkins
Ferguson Martin

Welker Flanders

McCarran Williams Frear

McCarthy So the amendment was not agreed to.

EXECUTIVE SESSION On motion by Mr. TAFT, The Senate proceeded to the consideration of executive business; and after the consideration of executive business,

LEGISLATIVE SESSION The Senate resumed its legislative session.

TITLE TO LANDS BENEATH NAVIGABLE WATERS

WITHIN STATE BOUNDARIES AND TO NAT-
URAL RESOURCES

The Senate resumed the consideration of its unfinished business, viz, the joint resolution (S. J. Res. 13) to confirm and establish the titles of the States to lands beneath navigable waters within State boundaries and to natural resources within such lands and waters, and to provide for the use and control of said lands and resources.

On motion by Mr. DOUGLAS to further amend the reported amendment by inserting on page 11, after the word "coast" in line 14 the words: of the main continent, and, in line 16, after the word "waters", a comma and the words and in the case of any island seaward of such coast, means the line of ordinary low water around such island,

Pending debate,

Mr. DOUGLAS raised a question as to the presence of a quorum;

Whereupon

The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. PAYNE in the chair) directed the roll to be called;

When

Seventy-six Senators answered to their names, as follows: Alken Green

Monroney Anderson Hayden

Morse Barrett

Hendrickson Mundt
Beall

Hickenlooper Murray
Bennett
Hill

Neely
Bricker
Hoey

Pastore
Bridges
Holland

Payne
Bush

Humphrey Potter
Butler, Md. Hunt

Purtell
Carlson
Ives

Saltonstall
Case
Jackson

Schoeppel
Clements Johnson, Colo. Smathers
Cooper

Johnson, Tex. Smith, Maine Cordon

Johnston, S. C. Smith, N. C.
Daniel

Knowland Sparkman
Dirksen
Kuchel

Stennis
Douglas
Langer

Taft
Dworshak Lehman

Thye
Ellender Long

Tobey
Ferguson
Malone

Watkins
Flanders
Mansfield

Welker
Frear
Martin

Wiley
Fulbright McCarran Williams
George

McCarthy Young
Goldwater McClellan
Gore

Millikin
A quorum being present,

The question being taken on agreeing to the amendment proposed by Mr. DOUGLAS,

It was determined in (Yeas----- 26 the negative----- Nays----- 50

On motion by Mr. DOUGLAS, The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the Senators present,

DEATH OF REPRESENTATIVE AND FORMER

SENATOR, HON. GARRETT L. WITHERS, OF KENTUCKY

Mr. CLEMENTS announced the death on today of Hon. GARRETT L. WITHERS, late a Representative and former Senator from Kentucky; and he submitted the following resolution (S. Res. 108):

Resolved, That the Senate has heard with profound sorrow the announcement of the death of Hon. GARRETT L. WITHERS, late a Representative and former Senator from the State of Kentucky.

Resolved, That a committee of two Senators be appointed by the Vice President to join the committee appointed on the part of the House of Representatives to attend the funeral of the deceased Representative.

Resolved, That the Secretary communicate these resolutions to the House of Representatives and transmit a copy thereof to the family of the deceased.

The Senate proceeded to consider the said resolution; and

Resolved, That the Senate unanimously agree thereto.

Under the second resolution, the Presiding Officer (Mr. POTTER in the chair) appointed Mr. CLEMENTS and Mr. COOPER as members of the funeral committee on the part of the Senate.

FRIDAY, MAY 1, 1953
(Legislative day of Monday, April

6, 1953) The PRESIDENT pro tempore called the Senate to order at 12 o'clock noon and Rev. Theodore T. Dixon, Plainville, Conn., offered prayer.

THE JOURNAL On motion by Mr. SALTONSTALL, and by unanimous consent,

The Journal of the proceedings of Thursday, April 30, 1953, was approved.

PRESIDENTIAL APPROVALS A message from the President of the United States, by Mr. Miller, his secretary.

Mr. President: The President of the United States on April 30, 1953, approved and signed the act (S. 1767) to amend and extend the provisions of the District of Columbia Emergency Rent Act of 1951.

Ordered, That the Secretary notify the House of Representatives thereof.

MESSAGE FROM THE HOUSE A message from the House of Representatives by Mr. Bartlett, one of its clerks:

Mr. President: The House of Representatives has passed the following bill and joint resolution, in which it requests the concurrence of the Senate:

H. R. 4654. An act to provide for the exemption from the Annual and Sick Leave Act of 1951 of certain officers in the executive branch of the Government, and for other purposes; and

H. J. Res. 241. Joint resolution to appoint a committee to attend the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the first airplane flight at Kill Devil Hills, Kitty Hawk, N. C. HOUSE BILL AND JOINT RESOLUTION RE

FERRED AND PLACED ON CALENDAR The bill and joint resolution this day received from the House of Representatives for concurrence were read the first and second times by unanimous consent.

Ordered, That the bill H. R. 4654 be referred to the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service; and

That the joint resolution H. J. Res. 241 be placed on the calendar. USELESS PAPERS IN GOVERNMENT

DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Archivist of the United States, transmitting, pursuant to law, a list of papers in various departments and agencies of the Government, recommended for disposition, which appear to have no permanent value or historical interest; which, with the accompanying papers, was referred to a Joint Select Committee on the Disposition of Papers in the Executive Departments; and

The PRESIDENT pro tempore appointed Mr. CARLSON and Mr. JOHNSTON of South Carolina as members of the Committee on the part of the Senate.

RECESS On motion by Mr. CLEMENTS, as a further mark of respect to the memory of the deceased,

The Senate took a recess until 12 o'clock noon tomorrow.

Ordered, That the Secretary notify the House of Representatives thereof.

PETITIONS AND MEMORIALS The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate the following petitions, etc., which were referred as indicated;

A resolution of the Legislature of the State of Rhode Island, favoring the passage of House bill 2137 relating to certain benefits being extended to persons who served in the Armed Forces of the United States in Mexico or its borders during the period beginning May 9, 1916, and ending April 6, 1917, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Finance.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore presented a resolution of the Legislature of the State of Nebraska, favoring the passage of the amendment to the joint resolution now pending giving the Federal Government supervision of offshore oil and that the proceeds therefrom be contributed to education; which was ordered to lie on the table.

Mr. GREEN (for himself and Mr. PasTORE) presented a resolution of the Legislature of the State of Rhode Island, favoring the repeal of the Fulbright amendment to the Walsh-Healey Act covering Government contracts with textile mills; which was referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare.

Mr. WILEY presented a resolution of the Board of Supervisors of Barron County, Wis., favoring agricultural income being placed on an equal basis with the things the farmer has to buy to maintain his farm operations, so the family-size farm will survive and remain prosperous; which was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry.

Mr. LEHMAN presented resolutions adopted by the Supreme Council of the Order of Sons of Italy in America, Washington, D. C., favoring an amendment of the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1952 to correct certain alleged inequities and inequalities in its provisions on the quota system based on national origins; which were referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

Mr. HUMPHREY presented the following resolutions, which were referred as indicated :

A resolution of the Twin Lakes Local, Minnesota Farmers Union, Twin Lakes, Minn., favoring the enactment of legislation supporting all farm products, perishables and nonperishables, at 99 to 110 percent of the old parity formula, through a program of compensatory payments and Federal purchase of surplus products;

Resolutions of the Central Cooperative Wholesale, Superior, Wis., as follows:

A resolution urging vigorous administration of the present 90-percent parity law and enactment of a 100-percent farm parity in 1954; and

A resolution favoring continued support of rural-electrification and promotion of measures whereby REA projects may be developed with assurance of access to power sources and with no discrimination because of their nonprofit cooperative nature; to the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry.

Mr. HUMPHREY presented a resolution of the Anoka-Hennepin Public Schools Education Association, Anoka, Minn., favoring the Hill amendment to the tidelands-oil bill giving money for the benefit of education; which was ordered to lie on the table. COMPILATION OF LAWS AND EXECUTIVE

ORDERS ON THE SECURITY OF THE UNITED STATES

Mr. WILEY presented a compilation prepared by the Legislative Reference Service of the Library of Congress of Federal statutes and Executive orders relating to the internal security of the United States, which was ordered to be printed as a Senate document.

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES Mr. GOLDWATER, by unanimous consent, from the Committee on Banking and Currency, to whom was referred the bill (S. 1376) to amend section 503 of the act entitled "An act to expedite the provision of housing in connection with national defense, and for other purposes," reported it without amendment and submitted a report (No. 213) thereon.

Mr. BRIDGES, by unanimous consent, from the Committee on Appropriations, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 4664) making supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1953, and for other purposes, reported it with amendments and submitted a report (No. 214) thereon.

REPORTS ON USELESS PAPERS Mr. CARLSON, by unanimous consent, from the Joint Committee on the Disposition of Papers in the Executive Department, to whom were referred lists of various papers in various departments and agencies recommended for disposition by the Archivist, dated April 14, 1953, submitted, pursuant to law, a report thereon.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS Bills were introduced by unanimous consent, severally read the first and second times, and referred as follows:

By Mr. LEHMAN: S. 1807. A bill for the relief of William Jeffrey Jonas; and

S. 1808. A bill for the relief of Hildegard Monti; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. GREEN: S. 1809. A bill for the relief of Evaristo Da Silva Gaspar and Victor Manuel Caetano; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. SALTONSTALL: S. 1810. A bill to amend the Canal Zone Code in reference to the survival of things in action; to the Committee on Armed Services.

By Mr. SALTONSTALL (by re

quest): S. 1811. A bill for the relief of the widow and children of the late John L. LeCours; to the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service.

By Mr. LANGER: S. 1812. A bill to amend the Organic Act of Puerto Rico so as to prevent discrimination, under Puerto Rican incometax laws against citizens of the various

States of the United States who are nonresidents of Puerto Rico; to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

S. 1813. A bill to amend title 28, United States Code, so as to extend the privilege of trial by jury to certain cases arising within the special maritime and territorial jurisdiction of the United States; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. MONRONEY (for himself

and Mr. KERR): S. 1814. A bill to authorize the Secretary of Agriculture to construct certain works of improvement for runoff and waterflow retardation, and soil-erosion prevention, on the Beaver Creek watershed in Oklahoma; and

S. 1815. A bill to provide for a preliminary examination and survey of the Bea. ver Creek watershed, in Oklahoma, for purposes of runoff and waterflow retardation and soil-erosion prevention; to the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry. MORAL CRUSADE FOR PEACE AND FREEDOM

Mr. JACKSON (for himself and Mr. WILEY, Mr. SPARKMAN, Mr. FULBRIGHT, Mr. GILLETTE, Mr. HILL, Mr. KEFAUVER, Mr. DOUGLAS, Mr. ANDERSON, Mr. MORSE, Mr. MAGNUSON, Mr. MURRAY, Mr. LEHMAN, and Mr. MANSFIELD) by unanimous consent, submitted the following concurrent resolution (s. Con. Res. 27); which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations:

Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring)

That the Congress of the United States appeal to the peoples of the world to join in a great moral crusade for peace and freedom;

That the Congress of the United States advocate and recommend that the next session of the General Assembly of the United Nations devote itself to the purpose of stopping the armaments race by speeding agreement upon effective and enforceable disarmament and control covering conventional armaments, biological and chemical agents, and atomic and hydrogen bombs;

That the Congress of the United States, as tangible evidence of its good faith, pledge itself to appropriate and to make available to the United Nations when an effective and enforceable system of worldwide disarmament and control takes effect-a substantial portion of all money saved for a period of 5 years, such sums to be expended by the United Nations for peaceful development of atomic energy, technical-assistance programs to underdeveloped areas, and general economic aid and assistance to all warravaged countries;

That the Congress of the United States call upon all other governments to make a like pledge; and, therefore,

That copies of this resolution be transmitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations and to each United Nations delegate and also that copies be transmitted to the presiding officer of every national parliament, congress, and deliberative assembly throughout the world.

TITLE TO LANDS BENEATH NAVIGABLE WATERS

WITHIN STATE BOUNDARIES AND TO NATURAL RESOURCES

The Senate resumed the consideration of its unfinished business, viz, the joint resolution (S. J. Res. 13) to confirm and establish the titles of the States to lands beneath navigable waters within State boundaries and to natural resources within such lands and waters, and to provide for the use and control of said lands and resources.

The question being on agreeing to the reported amendment, as amended, striking out all after the resolving clause and inserting in lieu thereof other words, Pending debate,

On motion by Mr. BUTLER of Maryland, and by unanimous consent,

Ordered, That when the Senate concludes its business today it take a recess until 12 o'clock noon on Monday next.

Pending debate,

On motion by Mr. SCHOEPPEL, at 4 o'clock and 50 minutes p. m.,

The Senate took a recess subject to the call of the Chair. AT 4 O'CLOCK AND 55 MINUTES P. M.

The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. GOLDWATER in the chair) called the Senate to order; and

The Senate resumed the consideration of its unfinished business, viz, the joint resolution (S. J. Res. 13).

The question being on agreeing to the reported amendment as amended,

On motion by Mr. KEFAUVER to further amend the said amendment by inserting in lieu of the part proposed to be inserted other words, Pending debate,

On motion by Mr. KEFAUVER, and by unanimous consent,

Ordered, That the further consideration of the said amendment be temporarily laid aside, and that when consideration is resumed, debate be limited to 10 minutes each for the proponents and opponents, all other time being relinquished.

EXECUTIVE BUSINESS During legislative session, certain executive business was transacted as in executive session, by unanimous consent.

RECESS On motion by Mr. SCHOEPPEL, at 5 o'clock and 58 minutes p. m.,

The Senate, under its order of today, took a recess until 12 noon on Monday next.

UNITED STATES SENATE,

PRESIDENT PRO TEMPORE, Washington, D. C., May 4, 1953. To the Senate:

Being temporarily absent from the Senate, I appoint Hon. ANDREW F. SCHOEPPEL, a Senator from the State of Kansas, to perform the duties of the Chair during my absence.

STYLES BRIDGES,

President pro tempore. Mr. SCHOEPPEL thereupon took the chair.

THE JOURNAL On motion by Mr. Taft, and by unanimous consent,

The Journal of the proceedings of Friday, May 1, 1953, was approved.

SENATORS EXCUSED Mr. KNOWLAND was excused from attendance upon the Senate for the remainder of today, on his own request.

Mr. HUNT was excused from attendance upon the Senate on today, on the request of Mr. JOHNSON of Texas.

COMMITTEE AUTHORIZED TO SIT The Subcommittee on Investigations of the Committee on Government Operations was authorized to sit during the session of the Senate today, on the request of Mr. TAFT.

RECIPROCAL TRADE AGREEMENT ACT The ACTING PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate the following communication from the President of the United States, which was referred to the Committee on Finance:

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, May 1, 1953. The VICE PRESIDENT, THE UNITED STATES SENATE,

Washington, D. C. DEAR MR. VICE PRESIDENT: In the message which I sent to the Congress on April 7, requesting a 1-year extension of the present Reciprocal Trade Agreements Act, I referred to the need for a thorough reexamination of our whole foreign economic policy.

I now recommend that a commission be established to make this review. The review should provide the basis for action during the next session of the Congress.

It is my belief that the proposed commission should be made up of Members of the Congress appointed by the Vice President and the Speaker of the House, and members appointed by myself from outside the Congress. It should be representative of both major parties. This is appropriate since commercial policy is an integral part of our total foreign policy from which broad national support is vital.

This commission naturally should work within the framework of our foreign policy and our global defense plans. Close liaison should be maintained with the group set up under the auspices of the State Department to follow up the economic and financial talks held earlier this spring between the United States and various European countries.

The commission should study all existing legislation and the regulations and

administrative procedures stemming from it which bear directly on our foreign economic relations. This review should seek to determine how these laws can be modified or improved so as to achieve the highest possible levels of international trade without subjecting parts of our economy to sudden or serious strains.

An inquiry of this nature is imperative. The economic policy of this Nation exercises such a profound influence on the entire free world that we must consider carefully each step we take. Changes in foreign economic policyeven those which at first have relatively slight consequences within this country-may either strengthen our allies or plunge them into a downward spiral of trade and payment restrictions, lower production, and declining living standards.

Our foreign economic policy also has important implications here at home. Declining imports will necessarily mean falling exports, resulting in a serious loss of markets for our agriculture and other industries. Expanded imports may require some adjustments in our country. We must make sure that changes in foreign economic policy consonant with our position as the world's greatest creditor nation do not benefit particular groups at the expense of the national welfare, but we must also make sure that such changes do not place unequal burdens on particular groups.

As I indicated in my previous message, the achievement of a strong and selfsupporting economic system in the free world, capable of providing adequate defense against aggression and of achieving rising standards of living, must be a cooperative effort. Through increasing two-way international trade and stimulating in every practical way the flow of private investment abroad we can strengthen the free world, including ourselves, in natural and healthy ways. By so doing, we can lessen and ultimately eliminate the heavy burden of foreign aid which we now bear. Both we and our friends abroad earnestly desire to see regular trade and investment replace grant assistance.

In launching a broad-gage study into the question of what our foreign economic policy should be, I think we can prepare the way for a fuller utilization of the economic strength of the free world in the cause of peace and prosperity. Sincerely,

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER. REPORT ON DISPOSAL OF CERTAIN RECORDS

The ACTING PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate a communication from the Acting Administrator of the General Services Administration, transmitting, pursuant to law, a report of the disposal of certain records of the Government under the provisions of sections 7, 10, and 11 of the act approved July 7, 1943, as amended; which, with the accompanying papers, was referred to the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service.

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

MONDAY, MAY 4, 1953 (Legislative day of Monday, April 6,

1953) Mr. ANDREW F. SCHOEPPEL, from the State of Kansas, called the Senate to order at 12 o'clock noon, and the Chaplain offered prayer. APPOINTMENT OF ACTING PRESIDENT PRO

TEMPORE The Secretary read the following communication from the President pro tempore:

26100—83-83-12-17

« PreviousContinue »