The Genteel Tradition: Nine Essays

Front Cover
U of Nebraska Press, Jan 1, 1998 - Philosophy - 201 pages
George Santayana probably did more than anyone except Alexis de Tocqueville to shape the critical view of American culture. The great philosopher and writer coined the phrase "genteel tradition, " introducing it during an address to a California audience in 1912. The phrase caught fire, giving a name to the culture of the republic. Santayana's address appears in this collection of influential essays about the country he lived in from 1872 to 1911. Because he remained European in spirit, the Spaniard brought a sharp detachment to his observations. He points out the American split between thought and action, theory and practice, the traditional and the modern, the arts and business, the highbrow and the popular. He also examines the excessive moralism in national life, which baffles Europeans. These nine essays touch on American idealism and materialism and American endeavor, sacred and profane.
 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
26
Section 3
37
Section 4
65
Section 5
72
Section 6
77
Section 7
99
Section 8
117
Section 9
131
Section 10
153
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About the author (1998)

Also the editor of Jefferson?s Literary Commonplace Book, Douglas L. Wilson is Lawrence Distinguished Professor Emeritus of English at Knox College. Robert Dawidoff, a professor of history at Claremont Graduate School, is the author of The Genteel Tradition and the Sacred Rage: High Culture vs. Democracy in Adams, James, and Santayana.

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