Early Greek Philosophy

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A. & C. Black, 1908 - Philosophy, Ancient - 433 pages
 

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Page 150 - Would that strife might perish from among gods and men!" He did not see that he was praying for the destruction of the universe; for, if his prayer were heard, all things would pass away.
Page 299 - All things were together infinite both in number and in smallness ; for the small too was infinite. And, when all things were together, none of them could be distinguished for their smallness.
Page 79 - Just as our soul, being air, holds us together, so do breath and air encompass the whole world.
Page 150 - Men do not know how what is at variance agrees with itself. It is an attunement of opposite tensions, like that of the bow and the lyre.
Page 198 - It needs must be that what can be thought and spoken of is; for it is possible for it to be, and it is not possible for what is nothing to be.
Page 153 - Those who speak with understanding must hold fast to what is common to all as a city holds fast to its law, and even more strongly.
Page 115 - Pythagoras' theorem. States that in a right-angled triangle, the square on the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the squares on the other two sides.
Page 200 - Moreover, it is immovable in the bonds of mighty chains, without beginning and without end; since coming into being and passing away have been driven afar, and true belief has cast them away. It is the same, and it rests in the self-same place, abiding in itself. And thus it remaineth constant in its place; for hard necessity keeps it in the bonds of the limit that holds it fast on every side.
Page 197 - Welcome, O youth, that comest to my abode on the car that bears thee, tended by immortal charioteers. It is no ill chance, but right and justice, that has sent thee forth to travel on this way. Far indeed does it lie from the beaten track of men. Meet it is that thou shouldst learn all things, as well as the unshaken heart of well-rounded truth, as the opinions of mortals in which is no true belief at all.
Page 386 - that which is, strictly speaking-, real is an absolute plenum; but the plenum is not one. On the contrary, there are an infinite number of them, and they are invisible owing to the smallness of their bulk. They move in the void (for there is a void) ; and by their coming together they effect coming into being; by their separation, passing away.

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