The colloquies of Edward Osborne, citizen and clothworker, of London, as reported [or rather, written] by ye authour of 'Mary Powell'.

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 131 - Lord God, deliver me out of this miserable and wretched life, and take me among thy chosen; howbeit, not my will but thine be done.
Page 296 - This is a charming little book ; and whether we regard its subject, cleverness, or delicacy of sentiment or expression— to say nothing of its type and orthography — it is likely to be a most acceptable present to young or old, be their peculiar taste for religion, morals, poetry, history, or romance.
Page 299 - THE CELT, THE ROMAN, AND THE SAXON; a History of the Early Inhabitants of Britain down to the Conversion of the Anglo-Saxons to Christianity. Illustrated by the Ancient Remains brought to light by Recent Research.
Page 297 - It ends with musical melancholy, a strain of exquisitely simple beauty, referring to the judicial slaying of one of England's worthiest sons. There are some fine portraits ably limned herein. There are family pictures so graphically described that they possess the mind for ever."— Church and State Gazette.
Page 297 - Clever and agreeable reading. . . . We can give the book unqualified praise for the pleasant, and tolerably accurate, pictures which it affords of the domestic manners of the period; and the characters of some of the personages represented are drawn with distinctness, and with the features of nature.
Page 299 - Fresh from the perusal of its immense array of facts, couched in pure phrase, and arranged in the most lucid order, we might be accused of enthusiasm, if we say it is the ablest summary of history and modern investigation with which we are acquainted ; hut, as most of our readers who open its pages will admit, our praise is far from being exaggerated.
Page 298 - Proverbial Philosophy," fcap. cloth, 7s. 6d. " With smoothness of measure, Mr. Tuppcr's design is always excellent, and his versification Is brought to bear upon things of no transient interest. It is one of the best characteristics of his labours, that he does not write for praise, but for the benefit of his fellow-men— not merely for time, but for eternity."—Bell's Mcnengcr.
Page 79 - to me, a Sinner ! ' " " GoD be merciful to me, a Sinner," repeated he, bursting forth into Weeping ; and I drew his Face down yet closer unto mine.
Page 300 - ILLUSTRATED WITH TWENTY-SEVEN ENGRAVINGS ON STEEL, A MAP, AND NUMEROUS WOODCUTS. " Mr. Bartlett has made a book, pleasant in letter-press, as well as...
Page 299 - CHRONICLE.—" Fresh from the perusal of its immense array of facts, couched in pure phrase, and arranged in the most lucid order, we might be accused of enthusiasm, if we say it is the ablest summary of history and modern investigation with which we are acquainted...

Bibliographic information