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The Oeconomy of Health

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Captain Thompson's Case of the Widows of the Officers of the Navy. ib.

Dunn's Navigator's Guide

ib.

A Letter from an Officer retired, to his Son in Parliament

333

Lord C-'s Answer to the Heroic Epistle

ib.

An Epistle to Mrs. M-rat Bath-Easton

ib.

The devoted Legions; addressed to Lord George Germaine

ib.

Marriot's Confiderations on the intermediate State

ib.

Hayes's Duclling; a Poem

334

Layard's Poetical Essay on Duelling

ib

CORRESPONDENCE.

Letter from T. C.

335

Letter from N. E.

ib.

Answers to Correspondents

ib.

M A Y.

Three Dialogues on Liberty

337

John Buncle, junior, Gentleman

345

Mrs. Miller's Letters from Italy, describing the Manners, Customs, &c.

of that Country

349

Dr. William King's Works

359

Mr. Twiss's Tour to Ireland

Andrew Marvell's Works, with his Life, by Capt. Edw. Thompson 373

Courtney Mclmoth's Liberal Opinions, or the History of Benignus 377

Emerson's Mathematical Miscellanies

Mills's Treatise on Cattle

384

Ode to Pinchbeck, by the Author of the Heroic Epistle to Sir W. Cham-

bers. Printed entire

385

Dr. King's Essay on Civil Government; with a Remonstrance to the

Common-council of London, on their depriving the Freemen at large

of their Constitutional Liberty

Voltaire's Young James, or the Sage and Atheist

392

Dr. George Campbell's Philosophy of Rhetorick

Dr. Kearney's Lectures concerning History

404

Baron Dimidale's Thoughts on general and partial Inoculation

ib.

Mr. Hartley's Speech in Parliament on the State of the Nation and the

present Civil War in Ainerica

405

Shenstone, or the Force of Benevolence; a Poem

406

The Exhibition of Fancy

ib,

Crawford's Revolution; a Poem

407

Dr. Goldsmith's Haunch of Venison; a poetical Epistle to Lord Clare.

Printed entire

408

Ugbrooke Park; a Poem

410

Lord C-M's Prophecy, an Ode

411

The Tears of the Foot Guards on their Departure for America

ib.

Answer to the Tears of the Foot Guards

412

A Week at a Cottage; a Pastoral Tale

ib.

Hawes’s Examination of Mr. Welley's Primitive Physic

ib.

A Matter of Moment

413

Gellert's Life of the Countefs of G-

414

The Polite Preceptor

ib.

'The Origin of Printing

ib,

Bedlam; a Ball

ib,

Wells's Address to the Genius of America

ib.
CORRESPONDENCE.

Letter from Mr. J. S. Sowden

415

Letter from a Laodicean, or Lukewarm, Philofopher

Answers to Correspondents

ib.

JUNE.
496

481
486

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J U N E.

Additions to the Works of Alexander Pope, Esq. with Original Poems,

and Letters of cotemporary Writers

417

Dr. Campbell's Philosophy of Rhetoric. Continued

Dr. King's Works. Concluded

434

Philofophical Transactions. Concluded

439

Garrick's Looking-Glass, or the Art of rising on the Stage

442

Dr. Chandler's Travels in Greece

445

Foote's Bankrupt

452

Dr. Goldimith's Survey of Experimental Philosophy

454

Dr. Hendy's Effay on Glandular Secretions

458

Lord Monboddo's Essays on the Origin and Progress of Language, Vol. III. 460

Ridpath's Border-History of England and Scotland

463

The Spleen; or, the Offspring of Folly, a Lyri-comi-tragic Tale 467

Durphy's Three Wecks after Marriage

473

Harmer's Observations on divers Passages in Scripture

475

Raspe's Account of German Volcanos

478

Hutton's Diarian Miscellany

480

Dr. Shebbeare's Essay on the Origin, Progress, and Establishment of na-

tional Society
The Trials of Richard Smith and Thomas Brand Hollis, Esqrs.

Bellamy's Family Preacher

487

Letters from the Duchess de Cruci and others

488

Letters relative to Societies for the Benefit of Widows, &c.

ib.

An Address to the Members of Parliament relative to palling an act for
Stage Coaches, Porters, &c.

ib.

Rofenstein's Diseases of Children, and their Remedies

489

Remarks on a Letter to a Baptist Minister

ib,

A Reply to Parmenas

490

Grammar and Rhetoric

491

Logic, Ontology, and the Art of Poetry

ib.

Quin's Rudiments of Book-keeping

ib.

A Reply to the Author of the Remarks on scriptural Confutation of

Mr. Lindsey's Apology

492

Lee's Man of Quality. A Farce

ib.

Don Quixotte. A musical Entertainment

493

The fine Gentleman's Etiquette

ib.

Thistlethwaite's Edward and Ellen. An heroic Ballad

ib.

Nominal Freedom actual Slavery, &c.

494

Peters's Sermons

495

Morell's Sacred Annals

ib,

The State of Man

ib.

Practical Remarks on West India Diseases

Thoughts on the several Regulations neceffarý to the Appointment of an

Advocate General

ib.

The Honour of the University of Oxford defended

ib.

A P P E N D I X.

Dr. Chandler's Travels in Greece. Concluded

497

Dr. Campbell's Philosophy of Rhetoric. Continued

502

Jenyns's View of the Internal Evidence of the Christian Religion 508

Reflections on the Growth of Heathenism among Modern Christians

529

Subscription; or Historical Extracts

530

Bennet's Lectures on that Part of the Church Catechism, commonly

called the Apostles Creed

ib.

Reflections on Goveroment, with Respect to America

531
Remarks on Dr. Price's Observations on Civil Liberty

ib.

Civil Liberty asserted, and the Rights of the Subject defended, against

the Anarchial Principles of Dr. Price

ib.

A Letter to the Rev. Dr. Price

ib.

Plan of Reconciliation between Great Britain and her Colonies 532

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The Constitutional Advocate

532

Independency the Object of the Congress in America

ib.

An Address to the People of Great Britain in general

ib.

A Prospect of the Consequences of the present Conduct of Great Britain

towards America

ib.

Serious and impartial Observations on the Blessings of Liberty and Peace 533

Toulmin's American War lamented. A Sermon.

Reflections on the American Contest

ib.

Dr. Watson's Principles of the Revolution vindicated

ib.

A full Defence of the Rev. Mr. John Weslev

534

A Vindication of the Rev. Mr. Wesley's “ Calm Address to our Ameri-

can Colonies"

ib.

Evans's Reply to the Rev. Mr. Fletcher's Vindication of Mr. Wesley's

Calm Address

ib.

Jenkins's Christian's Strength. ` A Sermon

ib.

Edwards's Sermons to the condemned

535

Sonnets

ib.

Maurice's Netherby: A Poem

ib,

Poetical Legends

ib

O'Beirne's Crucifixion : A Pocin

ib.
Mac Fingal; or, the Town-Meeting. A Modern Epic Poem

536

Julia Beníon

537

Williamson's Stenography

ib.
An Etay upon the King's Friends

ib.
Dr. Rowley's Medical Advice for the Use of the Army and Nary ib.

A Letter from Dr. Tillot, to Dr. Zimmerman, on the Morbus Niger ib.

Nugent's Calc

538

Richardson's Appeal to the Officers of the Guards

The Antiquity and Functions of the Lord High Steward of England ib.

The Ceremonial for the Trial of a Peer in Westminster Hall

ib.

Dr. Ibbetson's Discourses on the Sacrament

ib.

Hallward's Doctrine of Faith and Good Works fated and explained ib.

CORRESPONDENCE.

Letter from A Governor

540

P. R.

ib.

A Reading Club

541

Answers to Correspondents

ib.

ib.

.

SAGES

Τ Η Ε

Τ Η Ε.

LONDON REVIEW,

FOR JANUARY 1776.

ART. I. Annals of Scotland. From the Acceffion of Malcolm 1112

Surnamed Canmore, to the Acceffion of Robert 1. By Sir David
Dalrymple *, 4to. 155. Murray.
To these Annals is prefixed the following advertisement.

" The design of the following sheets, is to exhibit a chronological view of the history of Scotland, from the accession of Malcolm, surnamed Canmore, to the accession of Robert Bruce.

“ They commence with the accession of Malcolm Canmore ; be. cause the history of Scotland, previous to that period, is involved in obscurity and fable. They are not brought down to a later period than the accession of Robert Bruce, because the author is solicitous to know the opinion of the public as to his plan and its execution.

“ If these are approved of, and if he has health and leisure, he proposes to continue the Annals of Scotland to the restoration of James I.”

This learned and critical writer, having thus modestly submitted his work to the opinion of the public, to that opinion we Thall candidly refer it, by confining Ourselves on this occafion merely to a display of the nature and extent of his performance. Of the text, or what may be more peculiarly stiled the Annals, the three or four first pages, relative to those famous personages, on whose story our immortal Shakespeare founded his tragedy of Macbeth, may afford as acceptable a specimen as any.

“ Malcolm II. king of Scotland, had a daughter, Beatrice, the mother of Duncan.-Fordun, iv. 49.

In 1034, Duncan succeeded his grandfather Malcolm. In 1039, he was affafinated by M'Beth 1:--Chr. Melros, 156

• One of the Lords of Session in Scotland. † At Inverness, according to our later historians. They follow Bosce, I. xii. fol. 280.a. The register of the priory of St. Andrew's says, '“ Doncath interfectus VOL. III.

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By his wife, the fifter † of Siward Earl of Northumberland, he left two sons,, Malcolm, firnamed Canmors, and Donald, firnamed Bane 1.- Fordun, iv. 49.

M’Beth expelled the sons of Duncan, and usurped the Scottish throne. Malcolm fought refuge in Cumberland, Donald, in the Hebrides.- Fordun, iv. 51.'

“ When Edward the Confeffor succeeded to the crown of England, (1043.] Earl Siward placed Malcolm under his protection. Malcolm remained long at his court, an honourable and neglected exile.--Fordun, iv. 54

• The partizans of Malcolm often attempted to procure his restoration ; but their efforts, feeble and ill-concerted, only served to establish the dominion of the ufurper.

Fordun, iv. 7. At length, M'Duff* thane of Fife, excited a formidable revolt in Scotland, while Siward, with the approbation of his fovereign, led the Northumbrians to the aid of his nephew Malcolm. He lived not to see the event of this generous enterprize t---Fordun, v.7. Cbr. Lax. 169.

“ M’Beth' retreated to the fastnesses of the north, and protracted the war. His people forsook his standard. Malcolm attacked him at Lunfanan 1 in Aberdeen-shire : Abandoned by his few remaining followers, M'Beth fell $ [5th December 1056.]-Fordun, v. 7.

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eft in Borbgouanan." Fordun says, I. iv. c. 49. that, being wounded, he was con-
veyed to Elgin, and died tbere. The word Borbouanan means, in Gaelic, the Smitb's
Dwelling. It is probable, that the affassins lay in ambush, and murdered him, at a
smith's house in the neighbourhood of Elgin.
+ Fordun calls her confanguinea comitis. Other historians call her bis daugbter.

Cean-more, or great-bead, according to the rude distinctions used in those times.
Bane, white, or of a fair complexion.

* Our historians relate, that M‘Duff, in an interview with Malcolm, proposed the plan of his restoration ; but that the young prince, suspecting the fidelity of M.Duff, artfully pretended that he knew himself to be unworthy of a crown. He urged, that he was libidinous, a thief, and void of faith. On this falfe confidence, a moft absurd conversation ensued, according to Fordun, ko v. C. 1.-6. Buchanan has polished the narrativs, and bestowed a plausible appearance on the fable; t. vii. p. 114.

+ The Saxon Chronicle places his death in 1055; p. 169. Ingulpbus, in 1056; p. 66. There is a curious pafiage concerning him in Leland, Collectanea, .: 1. P: 529. & Sivard fex: bis Sanne to warre in Scotland, wber be dyid of be flux; where he af. ter toke the same decease, and dyid of it. But he, much detesting to dy like a cow of the flux, caussid himself to be armid at all peaces, and dyed yn his armure." Brompton, P 946. relates the dying words of Siward in a bombart style, which he mistook for el quence. The accompt which Brompton gives of Siward is ridiculous and contradictory. It ends with saying, that Siward put King Duncan in poffeffion of Scotland.

I In Aberdcenshire, two miles north-west of the village of Kincardin o Neil. Juit by the parish-church of Lunfanan, there is a valley where the vestiges of an antient fortrels are still to be difcerned. It has been of an oblong figure ; in length, near an hundred yards, and twenty yards in breadth. A brook, which waters the valley, has been led round it. As no remains of buildings are to be seen, it is probable that the fortress was composed of timber and sod. In this folitary place, we may conjecture that M‘Beth fought an asylum.

Ś We know few particulars of the real history of M‘Beth.. Boece says, that his mother was Doada, a daughter of Malcolm II. and, confequentiy, that he was the coulin-german of Duncan; l. xii. fol. 246. b. Fordun teems to have been ignorant of his connection with the royal family. He terms him fimply, M«Berh tbe for of Finele, (or Finlay;) 1. iv, c. 49. Boece has exerted all his inventive powers in de

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