Selected Articles on World Peace Including International Arbitration and Disarmament

Front Cover
H.W. Wilson Company, 1916 - 256 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 217 - All government, indeed every human benefit and enjoyment, every virtue, and every prudent act, is founded on compromise and barter. We balance inconveniences, we give and take, we remit some rights that we may enjoy others, and we choose rather to be happy citizens than subtle disputants.
Page 20 - If now we can negotiate and put through a positive agreement with some great nation to abide the adjudication of an international arbitral court in every issue which cannot be settled by negotiation, no matter what it involves, whether honor, territory, or money...
Page 20 - But, granted sincerity of purpose, the great powers of the world should find no insurmountable difficulty in reaching an agreement which would put an end to the present costly and growing extravagance of expenditure on naval armaments.
Page 133 - Caesarian type of which history shows so many examples, and which is all that General Lea seems able to imagine. But there is no reason to think that women can no longer be the mothers of Napoleonic or Alexandrian characters; and if these come in Japan and find their opportunity, just such surprises as "The Valor of Ignorance " paints may lurk in ambush for us.
Page 106 - The naval force to be maintained upon the American lakes by His Majesty and the Government of the United States shall henceforth be confined to the following vessels on each side, that is — On Lake Ontario, to one vessel not exceeding one hundred tons burden, and armed with one eighteen pound cannon. On the Upper Lakes, to two vessels not exceeding like burden each, and armed with like force.
Page 131 - The weakness of so much merely negative criticism is evident — pacificism makes no converts from the military party. The military party denies neither the bestiality nor the horror, nor the expense ; it only says that these things tell but half the story. It only says that war is worth them ; that, taking human nature as a whole, its wars are its best protection against its weaker and more cowardly self, and that mankind cannot afford to adopt a peace-economy.
Page 9 - What won the battles on the Yalu, in Korea or Manchuria," says the Japanese writer, Nitobe, "was the ghosts of our fathers guiding our hands and beating in our hearts.
Page 1 - If the existence of war always implies injustice, in one at least of the parties concerned, it is also the fruitful parent of crimes. It reverses, with respect to its objects, all the rules of morality. It is nothing less than a temporary repeal of the principles of virtue, It is a system out of which almost all the virtues are excluded, and in which nearly all the vices are incorporated.
Page 133 - ... game in which the first moves were her wars with China and Russia and her treaty with England, and of which the final objective is the capture of the Philippines, the Hawaiian Islands, Alaska, and the whole of our Coast west of the Sierra Passes. This will give Japan what her ineluctable vocation as a state...
Page 67 - In the latter part of the seventeenth and early part of the eighteenth century...

Bibliographic information