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cause he expected not praises from others, and these the only fit men to be entrusted with the cause, and no others; and therefore went in that extraordinary way, and not in the way of the nation, because, till the spirit was more poured forth, the people would not be in a capacity to chuse such men, &c. Now whether the late picking and chusing, as is before expressed, a party of men of such a spirit, and under such qualifications, as this present parliament, so called, is of, be not a notorious destroying of that profession and principle then owned, and seemingly practised? Let all honest and unbyassed men judge. Here follows the truest and best account, that as yet can be gotten, of the

names of those gentlemen, who continued in the house, and have places of profit, offices, sularies, and advantages, in the commonwealth. Together with the names of the sons, kinsmen, servants, and others, who are under engagements unto, and have dependence upon the protector, so cal led, who, being so well seasoned with the salt of his palace, according to Ezra iv. 14, must needs be devoted to his interest, wherein their own is wholly involved.

Of the council. Mr. LAWRENCE, as president, one-thousand pounds per annum.

Major-general Lambert, as one of the council, one thousand pounds per annum; as major-general of the army, three-hundred and sixty-five pounds; as colonel of horse, four-hundred and seventy-four pounds ten shillings; as colonel of foot, three-hundred and sixty-five pounds; and, as it is reported, had the general's pay, three-thousand, six-hundred, and forty pounds per annum; as major-general of some countries, sixhundred sixty-six pounds, thirteen shillings, and four-pence; in all, sixthousand five hundred, and eleven pounds, three shillings, and fourpence. These places he had, but whether he hath the conscience to receive thus for them, or gives any away to those that act under him, is best known to himself, he is also a lord of the Cinque Ports.

Lieutenant-general Fleetwood, as one of the council, one-thousand pounds per annum; as Lord-deputy of Ireland, three thousand, sixhundred, and forty pounds per annuin; as colonel of horse in Ireland, four-hundred seventy-four pounds, ten shillings; as colonel of foot there three-hundred sixty-five pounds; as colonel of horse in England, fourhundred, seventy-four pounds, ten shillings; as major-general of some counties, six-hundred sixty-six pounds, thirteen shillings, and four-pence. In all six-thousand, six-hundred and twenty pounds, thirteen shillings, and four-pence. It is said he remained lieutenant-general of the horse in England. It is supposed he hath all these places, but whether he receives all the pay, or gives any to those that act under him, himself best knows. He married the protector's daughter.

Major-general Desbrow, as one of the council, one-thousand pounds, per annum; as general at sea, one-thousand ninety-five pounds; as coIonel of horse, four-hundred seventy-four pounds, ten shillings; as major-general of the western countries, six-hundred sixty-six pounds, thir. teen shillings, and four pence; in all, three-thousand, two-hundred, thirty-six pounds, three shillings, and four pence per annum. It is said he is one of the Cinque Port Lords. He married the protector's sister, whereby he is doubly engaged to serve his brother's interest.

Colonel Montague, as one of the council, one-thousand pounds per

annum; commissioner of the treasury, onethousand pounds; as general at sea, one-thousand ninety-five pounds; in all, three-thousand ninety-five pounds per annum.

Colonel Sydenham, as one of the council, one-thousand pounds per annum; one of the commissioners of the treasury, one-thousand pounds; in all, two-thonsand pounds per anuum; besides the government of the Isle of Wight.

Colonel Fines, as one of the council, one-thousand pounds per annum; commissioner of the great seal, one-thousand pounds; as keeper of the privy-seal, supposed worth one-thousand pounds more; in all, three-thou. sand pounds per annum.

SirCharles Ousley,as one of the council,one-thousand pounds perannum.

Mr. Strickland, as one of the council, one-thousand pounds per annum; and is captain of the gray-coat foot-guard at Whitehall.

Sir Gilbert Pickering, as one of the council, one-thousand pounds per annum ; chamberlain at court, and steward of Westminster.

Major-general Skippon, as one of the council, one-thousand pounds per annum; as major-general of the city, it is supposed he hath six-hundred sixty-six pounds, thirteen shillings, and four pence, according to his brethren, major-generals of the counties.

Mr. Rouse, as one of the council, one-thousand pounds per annum; as provost of Eaton college, five-hundred pounds; in all, fifteen-hundred pounds.

Colonel Philip Jones, as one of the council, one-thousand pounds per annum; he either is, or was his Master Cromwell's steward, or overseer, of his lands in Wales, and is custos rotulorum of two or three counties there.

Mr. John Thurloe, secretary of state, and chief post-master of En. gland, places of a vast income; he may justly be said to have a great hand in bringing all this abominablewickedness, slavery, and oppression, that hath been for above these three years, to this very day, upon the nation. Here follow the names of those lawyers that continued in the house, who

have advantages from the State, who are placed in the van of the soldiers, as the more honourable persons ; their general having lately luid aside, and delivered up his sword, to put on the gown.

SIR Thomas Widdrington, as speaker of the house, thirty-five pounds a week, which is one-thousand, eight-hundred, and twenty-nine pounds per annum; as commissioner of the treasury, one-thousand pounds per annum; in all, two-thousand, eight-hundred, and twenty-nine pounds per annum; and hath besides, for every private act, five pounds, and for every stranger that is naturalised, or made a free denison; and hath gotten for that already, as is supposed, near one-thousand five-hundred pounds; he is recorder of York. Having these great engagements upon him, he can do no other, if it be required, than put on the King's oid robe upon his Lord protector.

Lord Whitlock, as commissioner of the treasury, one-thousand pounds per annum. His son is a captain in the army, and lately made a knight; he must needs serve the court interest.

Lord Lisle, one of the commissioners of the great-seal, one-thousand pounds per annum.

Mr. William Lenthal, speaker of the old parliament formerly, as más. ter of the rolls, supposed worth two-thousand pounds per annum.

Mr. Prideaux, as attorney-general to the state, five pounds for every patent, and five pounds for every pardon; and by the liberty of pleading within the bar, together with two-thousand pounds he gets by great fees, it is supposed to amount to, in all, near six-thousand pounds per annum.

Mr. Glyn, one of the eleven members formerly impeached by the army of treason, now lord chief justice of England; for which he hath one-thousand pounds per annuin, besides other advantages; a man of principles fitted for the interest of monarchy.

Mr. Ellis, as sollicitor-general to the State, hath, as is supposed, near three-thousand pounds per annum.

Mr. Parker, as one of the barons of the exchequer, one-thousand pounds per annum.

Baron Nicholas, the same place and salary.
Baron Hill, the same place and salary.

Mr. Lechmere, attorney of the dutchy; his advantage thereby is not well known.

Mr. Nathaniel Bacon, as one of the masters of requests, five-hundred pounds per annum.

Mr. Francis Bacon, the like place and salary.

Lislebone Long, lately one of the masters of requests; and, the better to carry on his master's interest among the low-spirited mayor, aldermen, and common-council in the city, is now made recorder of London, supposed worth two-thousand pounds per annum, and is also a new knight to the new court.

Miles Fleetwood, one of the clerks of the privy-seal, supposed worth between three and four-hundred pounds per annum.

Mr. Robert Shapcot, one of the commissioners for executing that abominable, oppressive, wicked act for the new buildings; his salary is as yet unknown.

Thomas Banfield, Recorder of Exon.
Thomas Westlake, Town-clerk.
Mr. Lister, Recorder of Hull.
Guibbon Goddarıl, Recorder of Lynn.
Lambert Godfrey, Recorder of Maidstone.

Colonel Matthews, Recorder of Malden.
The names of the officers belonging to the armies of Englund, Scotland, and

Ireland, and their garisons, and such as are of the country troops, and the late created major-generals.

Of the army in England. COLONEL WHALEY, as commissary.general of the horse, onehundred, seventy-three pounds, fifteen shillings and four pence per annum; as colonel of horse, four-hundred seventy-four pounds, ten shillings, besides other advantages in the regiment; as one of the major-generals of the counties, six-hundred sixty-six pounds, thirteen shillings, and four-pence; in all, one-thousand, four-hundred, and fourteen pounds, eighteen shillings, and four pence per annuin.

Colonel Grosvenor, as quarter-master general, four-hundred, nineteen pounds, ten shillings per annum; and, it is said, hath captain of horse's pay. And, the better to carry it in the choice at Westminster, the soldiers were bid pull off their red coats, and put on others, and to give their vote for him; which is contrary to article the eighteenth of the old de. cayed instrument of government, which allows none, that is not worth two-hundred pounds, to choose parliament-men.

George Downing, as scout-master general, three-hundred and sixtyfive pounds per annum; as one of the tellers in the exchequer, five-hundred pounds; in all, eight-hundred and sixty-five pounds per annum. It is said he hath the captain's pay of a troop of horse; formerly scoutmaster against cavaliers and moss-troopers, but now against the saints, and sends spies amongst the churches.

Mr. Marieth, as judge-advocate of the army, two-hundred seventythree pounds, fifteen shillings per annum.

Captain Blackwell, as treasurer of the army, six-hundred pounds per annum.

Colonel Ingoldsby, as colonel of horse, four-hundred and seventy-four pounds, ten shillings, per annum, besides other advantages in the regiment; he is protector's (so called) kinsman, and will make no scruple to do whatever he will have him.

Colonel Hacker, as colonel of horse, the same pay, and advantages in the regiment.

Colonel Winthrop, of horse, the same.

Colonel Robert Lilburn, as colonel of horse; and six-hundred sixtysix pounds, thirteen shillings and four pence, as one of the major-generals; in all, one-thousand, one-hundred, and forty-one pounds, three shillings, and four pence.

Colonel Berry, as colonel of horse, and one of the major-generals, the

Major Packer, as colonel of horse, and major-general, the like advantage.

Colonel Goff, as colonel of horse, and major-general, the like. This is he that, with Colonel White, brought the soldiers, and turned the honest party, remaining behind in the little parliament, out of doors.

Colonel Bridges, as colonel of horse, and a major-general, the same advantage with the others. This is he, who, it is reported, dealt treacherously with his Colonel Okey, to get his place.

Major Hains, as Major of Fleetwood's regiment of horse, three-hun. dred fifty-eight pounds, eighteen shillings, and four pence; and, asa major-general, six-hundred sixty-six pounds, thirteen shillings, and four pence; in all, one-thousand, twenty-five pounds, eleven shillings, and eight pence per annum. Major Butler, of horse, and, as major-general, the same advantage.

Major Wareing, if not major of horse, he is captain of the county troop, and a farmer of the excise in the country.

Captain Baines, as captain of horse, two-hundred seventy-three pounds per annum, besides other advantages in the troop; as one of the committee of preservation of the excise and customs, three-hundred pounds; in all, five-hundred seventy-three pounds per annum.

like pay.

Captain Fox, captain of horse, and governor of Pehdennis castle; he married the protector's, so called, kinswoman.

Captain Scotten, captain of horse, two-hundred seventy-three pounds per annum, besides other advantages in the troop.

Captain Lilburn, of horse, the like advantage.

Major Jenkins, so called, captain of a troop of horse, the like advantage.

Officers belonging to the regiments of horse in Ireland. COLONEL REYNOLDS, as commissary-general of horse, twohundred seventy-three pounds per annum; as colonel of horse, fourhundred seventy-four pounds, ten shillings; in all, seven-hundred fortyseven pounds ten shillings per annum; and is now general of the English army under the dispose of the protector's brother and confederate, Cardinal Mazarine in France, and is one of the new made knights.

Colonel Zanchy, as colonel of horse, four-hundred seventy-four pounds, ten shillings per annum, besides other advantages, and lives much in Fleetwood's house.

Sir Theophilus Jones, as major of borse, three-hundred fifty-eight pounds, eighteen shillings, and four pence per annum, besides other advantages.

Major Morgan, of Fleetwood's regiment, the same.
Major Owen, as major of horse, the same.
Major Redinan, as major of horse, the like.
Colonel Albot, colonel of dragoons.

Oficers belonging to the regiments of foot in England, that sat in the

house.

COLONEL BAXTER, as captain of a foot company, one-hundred forty-six pounds per annum, besides other advantages in the company; as major-general of Middlesex, six-hundred sixty-six pounds, thirteen shillings, and four pence; as lieutenant of the Tower, two-hundred and fifty pounds. The benefit of ten warders pay, who had a livelihood by it; he having so procured, that, as they die, or are otherwise laid aside, the two-hundred pounds per annum, which paid them, comes into his pocket, besides a fee, or fine, imposed upon all persons, brought as prisoners into the Tower, according to their quality; and bath the benefit of the wharf, and letting of houses in the Tower, and several other advantages, which are oppressive, amounting to, in all, as is conceived, about two-thousand pounds per annum. He is one of the new made knights, and one of the commissioners for suppressing the printing. presses, as the bishops panders in the King's days; one that makes men Offenders, and casts them into prison, for words he hath drawn forth from them in examining against themselves. A lyar, one that deals more injuriously with the Lord's people, keeping, many times, their nearest relations and friends from coming to them, witness that faithful friend to the cause of God and his people, major-general Overton, amongst others, then heathens, Acts xxiv. 23, and yet, since this is he

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