Auguste Comte: Volume 3: An Intellectual Biography

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Cambridge University Press, 1993 - History - 667 pages
This book constitutes the first volume of a projected two-volume intellectual biography of Auguste Comte, the founder of modern sociology and a philosophical movement called positivism. Volume One offers a reinterpretation of Comte's "first career," (1798-1842) when he completed the scientific foundation of his philosophy. It describes the interplay between Comte's ideas and the historical context of postrevolutionary France, his struggles with poverty and mental illness, and his volatile relationships with friends, family, and colleagues, including such famous contemporaries as Saint-Simon, the Saint-Simonians, Guizot, and John Stuart Mill. Pickering shows that the man who called for a new social philosophy based on the sciences was not only ill at ease in the most basic human relationships, but also profoundly questioned the ability of the purely scientific spirit to regenerate the political and social world.
 

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Contents

59
159
Comtes Philosophy
246
The Testament
474
The Death of the Great Priest of Humanity
526
Conclusion
580
Bibliography
609
Index
633
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Mary Pickering is Professor of History at San Jose State University.

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