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ing that you have done your best to be an important consideration when the secure this happy result.

time comes for the choice of a Public If Boy is on good authority pro- School. True, indeed, all Public nounced to be a scholar sans peur et Schools are by way of preparing for fans reproche, or even the more or all professions; but some will be better dinary type of scholar for whom the nurseries than others for one particular word superannuation has no terrors, profession. It is an early day, you may your field is comparatively open: I use say, to think of Boy's profession, when the word comparatively with design, he is little more than a child, only as the Winchester authorities, having thirteen or thereabouts. But surely, won the right to pick and choose, are if he is inclined to work at all, it is rather jealous of reserving vacancies better that he should have something for any stray applicant.

more definite and more substantial to "You are not of us and you must not work for than school prizes,-those be uith us," said Mary Cave to George smartly bound books which he proudly Effingham.

puts up in a shelf at home, and never Having made this reservation, I may thinks of reading. fairly say that in making your choice "I allers like pickles, they looks comof a Public School you have a perfect fortable," quoth a farmer's wife. But embarras de richesse. According to the she never ate them, though she played Public Schools' Year Book, rather more a remarkably good knife and fork on tban a hundred establishments claim the more solid viands. School prizes the title. So far as I know to the con- are also very comfortable; but Boy trary, each one of these may be doing ought-at any rate by the time that good work, and there is no ground for he has struck fifteen-to have a more supposing that such a place as Abing- solid ambition. He has long since disdon-1 quote it as coming first in alpha- carded the early aspirations to become betical order-is infringing a patent by huntsman, postilion, footman in skyblue calling itself a Public School. But you livery, or anything else that wears will have to subdivide the total number bright colors and suggests a free-andby at least four, and perhaps by five, easy existence. Has nothing taken the before you get the number of those place of childhood's fancies in his mind, which are commonly accepted as Pub- or have you yourself never troubled lic Schools, and even then old-fashioned your head to think of his future? people will say that you have been over Sea-going, in the Royal Navy at and above liberal. I have no intention least, the Admiralty has already whatever of committing myself so far tabooed for him. That one year, that as to give a "correct card” of Publicone very useless year, in the lower Schools. A few that I may happen to forms of a Public School, is no longer mention particularly I may in my own either recommended or enjoined by the mind account as Public Schools. But Navy Regulations. But there is always neither am I prepared to give reasons an off-chance that the idea may crop for my classification, nor am I likely up again. “Vestigia nulla retrorsum” to mention the names of quite twice as has not hitherto been found to apply many more which I should without to the Board that rules the destiny of hesitation place in the same category. our first line of defence.

Now, what do you and his father Apart from the Navy, at the time wish Boy to be trained for, Cornelia ? when Boy enters the Public School any What profession is he intended to fol. profession is just a few years in front low? The future calling must always of him, and the sooner he makes up

bis mind to work for some definite A few tentative remarks about points end in view, the more likely he is to of difference between various schools succeed in after-life.

may or may not be of interest to you, "My Boy won't want any profes- Cornelia, and in either case must only sion,” now and again asserts the coun- be regarded as so many scraps of sectry squire; "he'll have a biggish place ond-hand evidence. of his own to look after some day, and Eton shall come first, as being at he'll find plenty to do there."

once the nursing-home of the Landed Plenty to do indeed if you are con- Gentry of England and the trainingtemplating suicide, you dear, silly old ground of the majority of our heredman. Yet even then he will do well to itary legislators, and of no small promaster the first principles of natural portion of the people's representatives. history, agriculture, horticulture, forest. If Boy is likely to be sufficiently enry, and a few other things besides. dowed with the goods of this world, Apart from some technical knowledge and either has political aspirations or of this kind, in the non-sporting months an inclination to become a useful memof the year, the life of the country ber of the Squirearchy, send him to squire must be a very tame and lack Eton by all means. There he will interlustre form of existence; and the spec- change ideas with boys of similar prostacle of an eldest son kicking his heels pects and aspirations to his own, nor will about at home while he is waiting to it be to his disadvantage to find himself step into his father's shoes is some rubbing shoulders with a good many thing too melancholy to contemplate. members of the class whom Coningsby

For Boy, who has to make his own in the days of his innocence designated way in the world, to be contented "infernal manufacturers.” In these either to drift into a profession or to modern days, partly perhaps with an go on waiting and hoping that some eye to business in the future, and thing will turn up, is a delusion and a partly in the hope that Boy may start snare. One perhaps in twenty of this life on a higher social level than his expectant brotherhood will fall upon father did before him, the wealthy his legs, nine at least of the remainder tradesman and the successful specuwill end by becoming assistant masters lator sends his son to Eton as a matter in private schools, not, indeed, because of course. These fathers are probably they have any vocation for teaching, wise in their generation. It may be much less a desire to teach, but really possible on the one hand that Mr. and truly faute de mieux. For a few Kipling's "cook's son" can borrow years to come this form of life ensures some "color of the mind” from "the tolerable comfort, a sufficiency of son of a belted earl"; on the other pocket-money, and a certain amount of hand it is well that the “infernal leisure to play games. Hence its fasci- manufacturer” should at an early age nation for the careless-minded.

obtain some insight into the foibles and A drifter, my dear Cornelia, is apt to prejudices of a class whom he may degenerate into a “waster," and the some time be called upon either to “waster" is the most contemptible of govern or to assist in governing others. all men. Look ahead, then, my dear It is equally impertinent, I am told, lady, and see that Boy shall never have Cornelia, to enquire either a lady's age cause to turn round upon his parents or the length of her husband's purse, and say that it was their want of fore. But if the cost of Boy's education be sight which, in the first instance, al. a really serious consideration, set not lowed or encouraged him to drift. your heart upon sending him to Eton. It may not be necessary for him there the family purse, substitute Dark Blue either to offer Mr. Ormsby "such a for Light Blue, and send him to Harbottle of champagne as you have never row. "Not quite the same class of tasted," or to have "venison for din boys there,” you may say. Well, perner every day” of one term, or even haps not quite the same, but somea “roast goose" for breakfast, but he thing very like it. If from Eton a will be in a false position if an over- longer roll of Premiers and Viceroys, rigid and too conspicuous form of from Harrow too a goodly list of Great economy is to be the order of the day. Men of Action. That very poor if very perfect Gentle. It is not many years since these lines man of France, M. de Marsac, with his were written,-written, alas! I fancy, "doublet awry" and his cloak "worse by one of whom the School on the seen from the side than the front," Hill can only cherish a loving memand with that jargon of white lies that ory: his fine feelings forced him to inflict upon his dying mother's ears, must

Who recks to-night of party spite

Or Irish agitation, over and over again have had "a heart

Of dull debates or Estimates full of bursting,” as he moved about

For freeing Education? kings' palaces.

Enough to ken that Englishmen. That the teaching of Eton is excel- To-night in peace are sleeping, lent for him who cares to learn, Balliol While Schools and Farms and Fleet and New College at Oxford, King's

and Arms and Trinity at Cambridge, are able to

Are safe in Harrow's keeping. testify. But one at least out of every There will certainly be nothing lost five men who send their sons to Eton in the way of good education, and anwill tell you frankly that from his other drop of we will say thirty pounds point of view the learning of dead in the School bill if Boy goes either languages is of very secondary im- to Winchester or to Rugby. If at either portance as compared with other ad- of these schools he chances to be less vantages offered by an Eton education. well fed than the Etonian is reputed

Let me warn you, Cornelia, that if to be, it will be rather because the Boy be one of those unfortunates who latter, drawn from a wealthier class, get a chill or catch a cold on every may happen to be more liberally suppossible occasion, you will be well ad- plied with pocket-money and eatables vised in sending him to a Tutor's House from home than because the ordinary rather than a Dame's. The Eton school-dietary of one school differs maDame of to-day commonly wears trou- terially either in quality or quantity sers when he walks abroad, and is from that of another. In contrasting doubtless a highly cultured individual. Winchester and Eton, while it may But Eton is very conservative in its be claimed that the successes of the ideas, and the tradition of the elders Etonian King's Scholars at Cambridge does not allow the Dame to act as are about on a par with those of the Tutor to the boys in his house. Going New College Winchester Scholars at out to "my Tutor's” on a damp night Oxford, it is probable that the Winin Eton is a distinctly catch-cold occu- chester system of education gets more pation.

good work out of the Commoner than If the thirty or forty pounds which does the Eton system out of the Oppiwill make all the difference between dan. And I think it will be found that Boy's comfort and discomfort in his the ranks of what are commonly Eton life is really a serious drain upon called the “Learned Professions" are

more largely recruited from Winchester you can have the pick of quite a dozen than from any other Public School. excellent schools, where the total ex

Possibly on the principle & åyáowy penditure on his behalf may be ayatol, the exclusiveness of Winchester roughly put down at from £120 to tends to this result. It is not easy, £130. He who is counting the cost of as has already been pointed out, for taking a house will add to the rent at any boy to become a Wykehamist ex- least another quarter-at the present cept by open competition unless he is rate of progression this promises fair to duly qualified by right of heredity. become a half-for rates and taxes. Now and again I have heard the state- A similar addition must be made to ment made that at least every other the figures given by the “Public boy at Winchester is a Radical. I do not Schools' Year Book” as “necessary anin any way vouch for the truth of the nual expenses,” by way of covering statement; but if it be even partially such items as pocket-money, journeytrue, it would seem to point to the money, books, and so forth. At each conclusion that the Radical is at least and every one of this last-mentioned as jealous of conserving what he group you may take it for granted deems to be his own as the so-called that Boy will be sufficiently well-preConservative. The Rugby of Arnold's pared for the Honor Schools at either time, when the mail-coach was the Oxford or Cambridge. Shrewsbury order of the day, was pretty well the still turns out its yearly tale of great one and only school for the Midland Greek scholars; Cheltenham and Wellsquire's and parson's sons who-to ington make a specialty of preparing parody Mr. Trevelyan-may be said to for the Woolwich and Sandhurst ex“have made the name of Rugby great," aminations; Tonbridge, and perhaps, without, however, running her "deep next to Tonbridge, Clifton, seems to in debt.” If, since the railway has offer most advantages to the boy supplanted the mail-coach and the post whose heart is set on engineering; chaise, Laurence Sheriffe's Founda- Marlborough, especially liberal in the tion has rather lost its original char way of cheapening education to the acter, time has in no degree impaired parson's son, wins honors galore in its efficiency as an educational centre. nearly every direction; and it is only The vitality of the oldest of our Mid- fair to add that Oundle, a very modest land schools may be gauged by the and economical establishment, gains facts that after a period of temporary many distinctions in mechanical and depression it has for some years past physical science. been full to overflowing, and that its Day boys, or home boarders, are list of University distinctions will countenanced rather than encouraged Winchester only excepted-bear com- at several of even the highest grade parison with that of any other school Public Schools. But in the matter of of the size. "Rough and ready" is the sending Boy as a day boarder, my addouble-barrelled epithet-or may I call vice to you, Cornelia, except under it compliment?—that I have sometimes stress of dire necessity, is briefly heard applied to the school-life at “Don't!" In theory it may sound an Rugby. It is probably less rough and enchanting thing to keep Boy under ready than it was in Tom Brown's your own eye and at the same time time, and after all, Cornelia, Boy is not give him the benefit of a Public School made of gingerbread.

education; but in practice he will comIf you wish to secure for Boy a monly be found to rank as “neither good education at a still smaller cost, flesh nor fowl nor good red herring.”

Still, if the purse be very limited, let ble that "noblemen have been rather me recommend you to move your goods scarce” at both these training-grounds, and chattels, Boy included, either to the quality of the education is undeBedford or to Manchester. If, as in niable. Dr. Bircb's establishment, it is possiBlackwood's Magazine.

THE HEART OF OLD JAPAN.

Kyoto, the ancient capital of the solemn groves which individualize the Mikados, unspoiled by Western in ancient sanctuaries of Japan. The fuences, as though separated from the modern city has shrunk to half the external world by her purple chain of original size, and from the lofty terguardian bills, remains the heart and races of Maruyama, consecrated by a centre of old Japan. The province thousand deathless memories, a golden of Yamato was the earliest seat of sea of ripening rice now sweeps from government, but the actual site of the the foot of the mountains to the gray royal palace was changed under every mass of broad-ea ved houses. A reiga, owing to the prevailing custom shrunken river flows through an exof discarding the dwelling of a de panse of gravel, crossed by numerous ceased father. In consequence of this bridges; the black gables and white fashion a new capital, created by the walls of the Shogun's castle break the needs of the court, sprang up round level outlines, and in the steep roofs the imperial residence, until the eighth of the ancient palace we trace that century modified the inconvenient prac- contour of a Shinto temple which astice. At this epoch the change of lo- sociated the deified monarch with the cality practically ceased, although the myriad divinities of his ancestral creed. palace was occasionally rebuilt for Here and there a scarlet gateway the dilated area of habitation and the stands out against the blackness of consolidation of trade forbade the de- cedar and pine, a gleam of gold or lacsertion of the populous city, and the quer on architrave and cornice indicatMikado's court, save for a few brief ing some temple hidden in the deep absences, remained there until his res- shade of luxuriant foliage. Kyoto retoration to power on the fall of the mains the priceless reliquary of Shogunate in 1868. Streets and Japan's golden age, when art and palaces, composed entirely of wood, chivalry vied with war and conquest were frequently burnt down, but in- in moulding the fortunes of the nation. Fariably rebuilt in the same style. The annals of the past were often Hierango (the City of Peace) became written in blood, but the cruelties blotMiyako, or Kyoto, the former being ting many a stirring record frequently the Japanese, the latter the Chinese resulted from that exaggeration of term for a metropolis.

sentiment which turns a virtue into The enforced seclusion of the Min the correlative vice. kado, worshipped as a god but retain. A shady walk extends for several ing a mere shadow of authority, prob- miles under the pines and cryptoably helped to consolidate the sacred merias of temple grounds on the capital, enclosed by a ring of noble green hillside, surely an ideal haunt temples under the shadow of those of forest-gods! Only a vague murmur

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