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The Thalia and Erato Press to Miss Vesta Swan to the Thalia and Miss Vesta Swan.

Erato Press. (Telegram.)

Dear Sirs,-In the report in the Too late. Error unimportant. papers this morning of the Bishop of

London's address ou the reconcilement [Several letters omitted.)

of the Letter and the Spirit, there is a XXIII.

most curious anticipation of a stateMiss Vesta Swan to the Thalia and

ment of mine in the poem, "Let us Erato Press.

ponder awhile," on page 132 of White

Pinings. I think that the enclosed (Extract.)

paragraph mentioning the coincidence .... And you will please be sure

might be sent to the Athenaeum. I am to send a copy with the author's com

told that all the other papers would pliments to Mr. Andrew Lang, as I

then copy it. hear he is so much interested in new

Yours truly, Vesta Swan. poets?

LIX. (From a vast correspondence the fol

Miss Vesta Swan to the Thalia and lowing six letters have been selected.]

Erato Press.
XXXI.

(Extract.) Miss Vesta Swan to the Thalia and A friend of mine got out of the train Erato Press.

and asked at all the bookstalls between (Extract.)

London and Manchester for W. P., and

not one had it. Is not this a scandal? .... My friends tell me that they

Something ought to be done to raise have great difficulty in buying White

the tone of railway reading. Please Pinings. A letter this morning says

send me six more copies.
that there is not a book-shop in Bir-
mingham that has heard of it.

LXVIII.
XLV.

Miss Vesta Swan to the Thalia and

Erato Press. Miss Vesta Swan to the Tbalia and

• (Extract.) Erato Press.

I am told that a few years ago a Dear Sirs,-Several persons have told

volume of poems was advertised by me lately that they have looked in vain

sandwichmen in the London streets. in the literary papers ever since White

Could not White Pinings be made Pinings was published, for any adver

known in this way? tisement of it, and they bave found none. Many of the books of the day

XC. are, I notice, advertised very freely, The Thalia and Erato Press to with, I have no doubt, good results-

Miss Vesta Swan. Mr. Hall Caine's last novel, for exam Dear Madam-We have much pleasple. Curiously enough, one of my ure in enclosing the first review of your poems ("An Evening Reverie," page poems that has reached us. Doubtless 76), contains very much the same moral now that a start has been made many as his book. Could you not intimate more will follow. that fact to the public in some way?

Yours faithfully. Please send me twelve more copies.

The Thalia and Erato Press. Yours truly, Vesta Swau. (1 Encl.)

per A. B. C.

From the Scots Reader.

Watch the progress of the soul One of the most amusing misprints Struggling aye to heaven our goal; that we can recollect occurs in White Pinings (Thalia and Erato Press), by but the waggisb printer has made her Vesta Swan, which otherwise is unim- say: portant. The poetess undoubtedly wrote:

Struggling aye to heave on coal,

Panah

THE REVIVAL OF THE ROAD.

In 1826 the famous roadmaker and ual and sectional. Palatial hostelries · engineer Telford crowned his life's like the grand old Hertford mansion at work by the mighty suspension bridge Marlborough had closed their doors at which lifted his new Holyhead mail once, The Castle Inn, so artistically road across the Menai Straits and com- dealt with by Mr. Stanley Weyman in pleted the link between London and a recent work, had for some time been Ireland for a fast service. Thousands the nucleus of a now famous public gathered at the opening ceremony when school before the coaches ceased to run the first coach from the metropolis, over considerable sections of the Bath carrying the Royal mails, slowed down road. The increasing railroad activity from its regulation pace of eleven and of the 'sixties, perhaps, marks the final a half miles an hour and rolled tri collapse of the rural highway into umphantly over the yawning chasm. the somnolence, and here and there As a combination of engineering skill the literally grass-grown trance, from and rapid communication it seemed, which it was quite recently awakened no doubt, to the cheering crowds below, by the once despised bicycle. Many a final achievement of human ingenu- of us now in middle age may peradity. Yet a short twenty years later venture remember the stricken appearthe son of George Stephenson was to ance of the forsaken coaching inn only commence that other bridge, alongside recently left high and dry at some of this first one, destined to carry bleak cross road; more woe-begone locomotion of a kind which by com. then, I think, than after it had adapted parison put the people who had so itself to its changed conditions, or gone recently cheered the Holyhead coach out of business altogether and into almost on a par with the Romans private life. Some of us may recall whose chariots and tumbrils had rolled how these dismal haunts of ancient along the Causeway from Chester to revelry, with their creaking signboards, Carnarvon nearly two thousand years seized on our childish imagination, if before. There is assuredly no spot we possessed one, and became the in Great Britain more calculated to background for all the tales of way. deter one from prophetic flights as to side horror and mystery that fell in our the limitations of science than the one way. As for me, some of these old which commands a view of these two inns have provided the stage furniture significant viaducts.

on such literary excursions for life; But the decline of the coach road and defying time, climate, space, and the the coaching inu was, of course, grad- most antagonistic environments. It

LIVING AGE. VOL. XXVI. 1861

LIV.

to

ith th

thor's com

XVII.
The Thalia and Erato Press to Miss Vesta Swan to the Thalia and
Miss Vesta Swan,

Erato Press.
(Telegram.)

Dear Sirs,-10 the report in the Too late. Error unimportant.

papers this morning of the Bishop of

London's address ou the reconcilement [Several letters omitted.]

of the Letter and the Spirit, there is a XXIII.

most curious anticipation of a stateMiss Vesta Swan to the Thalia and

ment of mine in the poem, “Let us Erato Press.

ponder awhile," on page 132 of White

Pinings. I think that the enclosed (Extract.)

paragraph mentioning the coincidence .... And you will please be sure

might be sent to the Athenaeum. I am

told that all the other papers would pliments to Mr. Andrew Lang, as I

then copy it. hear he is so much interested in new

Yours truly, Vesta Swan. poets?

LIX. [From a vast correspondence the fol

Miss Vesta Swan to the Thalia and lowing six letters have been selected.]

Erato Press.
XXXI.

(Extract.) Miss Vesta Swan to the Thalia and A friend of mine got out of the train Erato Press.

and asked at all the bookstalls between (Extract.)

London and Manchester for W. P., and

not one had it. Is not this a scandal? .... My friends tell me that they

Something ought to be done to raise have great difficulty in buying White

the tone of railway reading. Please Pinings. A letter this morning says

send me six more copies.
that there is not a book-shop in Bir-
mingham that has heard of it.

LXVIII.
XLV.

Miss Vesta Swan to the Thalia and

Erato Press. Miss Vesta Swan to the Thalia aud

. (Extract.) Erato Press.

I am told that a few years ago a Dear Sirs,-Several persons have told

volume of poems was advertised by me lately that they have looked in vain

sandwichmen in the London streets. in the literary papers ever since White

Could not White Pinings be made Pinings was published, for any adver:

known in this way? tisement of it, and they brave found none. Many of the books of the day

XC. are, I notice, advertised very freely, The Thalia and Erato Press to with, I have no doubt, good results-

Miss Vesta Swan. Mr. Hall Caine's last novel, for exam Dear Madam,,We have much pleas- i ple. Curiously enough, one of my ure in enclosing the first review of your * poems ("An Evening Reverie," page poems that has reached us. Doubtless 70), contains very much the same moral now that a start has been made many as his book. Could you not intimate more will follow. that fact to the public in some way?

Yours faithfully, Please send me twelve more copies.

The Thalia and Erato Press. Yours truly, Vesta Swau.

(1 Encl.]

per A. B. C.

Watch the progress of the soul
Struggling aye to heaven our goal;

From the Scots Reader. One of the most amusing misprints that we can recollect occurs in White Pinings (Thalia and Erato Press), by Vesta Swan, which otherwise is unimportant. The poetess undoubtedly wrote: Panah,

but the waggisb printer has made her say:

Struggling aye to heave on coal,

THE REVIVAL OF THE ROAD.

In 1826 the famous roadmaker and ual and sectional. Palatial hostelries engineer Telford crowned his life's like the grand old Hertford mansion at work by the mighty suspension bridge Marlborough had closed their doors at which lifted his new Holyhead mail once. The Castle Inn, so artistically road across the Menai Straits and com- dealt with by Mr. Stanley Weyman in pleted the link between London and a recent work, bad for some time been Ireland for a fast service. Thousands the nucleus of a now famous public gathered at the opening ceremony when school before the coaches ceased to run the first coach from the metropolis, over considerable sections of the Bath carrying the Royal mails, slowed down road. The increasing railroad activity from its regulation pace of eleven and of the 'sixties, perhaps, marks the final a half miles an hour and rolled tri. collapse of the rural highway into umphantly over the yawning chasm. the somnolence, and here and there As a combination of engineering skill the literally grass-grown trance, from and rapid communication it seemed, which it was quite recently awakened no doubt, to the cheering crowds below, by the once despised bicycle. Many a final achievement of human ingenu- of us now in middle age may peradity. Yet a short twenty years later venture remember the stricken appearthe son of George Stephenson was to ance of the forsaken coaching inn only commence that other bridge, alongside recently left high and dry at some of this first one, destined to carry bleak cross road; more woe-begone locomotion of a kind which by com. then, I think, than after it had adapted parison put the people who had so itself to its changed conditions, or gone recently cheered the Holyhead coach out of business altogether and into almost on a par with the Romans private life. Some of us may recall whose chariots and tumbrils had rolled how these dismal haunts of ancient along the Causeway from Chester to revelry, with their creaking signboards, Carnarvon nearly two thousand years seized on our childish imagination, ir before. There is assuredly no spot we possessed one, and became the in Great Britain more calculated to background for all the tales of way. deter one from prophetic flights as to side horror and mystery that fell in our the limitations of science than the one way. As for me, some of these old which commands a view of these two inns have provided the stage furniture significant viaducts.

on such literary excursions for life; But the decline of the coach road and defying time, climate, space, and the the coaching inu was, of course, grad- most antagonistic environments. It

LIVING AGE. VOL. XXVI. 1861

is a positive shock if perchance I wan- House was very much what we see der down their way nowadays to find Dow in the beautiful Queen Anne mansome dismal old Solitary who has thus sion which forms the main building served my fancy as a sort of chamber of Marlborough College. - Under the of horrors-no longer dismal, but with sway, however, of the somewhat fa. a smiling face and a befurbished front mous Countess of Hertford, afterwards and a line of bicycles and a motor out- Duchess of Somerset, it became one side the door.

of the best-known country houses in But let us turn for a moment, before England. Her ladyship was not only taking stock of present conditions, to a social luminary, but an enthusiastic the actual story of one of the more follower of the Arcadian cult which famous of these old hostelries, and peopled the surrounding country with none has a stranger one than the Corydons and Chloes and made shepCastle Inn at Marlborough already herds and milkmaids of their guests referred to. Placed within a stone's from court and capital. Lady Hertford throw of one of the largest of those had good material for her extravagant prehistoric mounds which are the fancies. The limpid streams of the despair of the antiquary, and on the Kennet slipped down the meadows of site of a royal castle where Anglo- perennial green from mill to mill. The Norman kings held courts and parlia ridge above was crowned with the ments, our inn started life with some northern fringe of the royal forest of distinction. The castle had been a Savernake. The old gardens were laid ruin long before Cromwell battered the out in terraces and bowling greens. church towers of Marlborough, and Rills of clear water were brought from with the rangership of the adjacent the Kennet and forced into a mimic forest of Savernake had passed into fury wholly strange to the waters of the family of the Protector Somerset Wiltshire, but suggestive to these and that Seymour lady who married early Georgian poseurs of the classic Henry VIII. in a barn on the forest's fountains where their nymphs and edge that quite recently, at any rate, swains lounged and loved. Groves of was still standing. In the time of limes were planted, which have now W’illiam III. the castle was still in the since living memory been towering hands of that branch of the family rep- rookeries. Yews were trimmed into resented by the Duke of Somerset, deep hedges surmounted with domes who, on the site of the decayed for- and cupolas, and thus survive endeared tress, built the noble mansion which, to all who love the place. Rocks were retaining its old name of The Castle, imported and strewn about, of which beca nie later on the Castle Inn. Celia no trace remains on the velvety turt Fiennes, the enterprising lady who which spreads to-day over the lawns rode about England on horseback and and slopes and terraces that time still left her impressions of all she saw, continues to mellow. Lady Hertford's watched it building. She describes the modish imagination succeeded in transnew or rather the rebuilt and greatly forming Wiltshire into Italy, and, yet enlarged house (for a sinaller one had greater feat, the Wiltshire rustic of preceded it), with the gardens in de- that dark period into the piping sheptail, and the old town stretching its herd of the classics: and she has left broad and picturesque street from the in writing the measure of her delugates as we see it now, "the Kennet sions. She built a grotto into the old winding below and turning many tumulus in imitation of Pope's at mills.” In 1723 the Castle or Seymour Twickenham, and imported celebrities

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