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fying of them. Faith in this matter holds the place of an evidence or seal of that righteousness which belonged to us, as being in Christ before we believed; as Canaan did to Abraham's seed before they were born; and is given us on the account of that our interest therein, (Phil, iii, 12.) that we might apprebend it, and enjoy the benefits of it, (Phil. i. 29.) which is surely a far better ground to build our justification upon, than our weak and imperfect faith, which stands in need daily of the righteousness of God for its own support,

Cole. Whatsoever is of nature's spinning must be all unravelled before Christ's righteousness can be put on.

Wilcox, Now the obedience of Christ was only performed upon the alcount of those whose nature he had assumed; as we by faith lay hold upon it, so God, through grace, imputes it to us, as if it had been performed by us in our own persons. And hence it is, that as in one place Christ is said to be made sin for us, (2 Cor. v. 21.) so in another place, he is said to be made our righteousness, (1 Cor. i. 30.) and in the fore-cited place, (2 Cor. v. 21.) as he is said to be made sin for us, so we are said to be made righteousness in him. But what righteousness? Our own ? No: the righteousness of God, radically bis, but imputatively ours; and this is the only way by which we are said to be made the righteousness of God, even by the righteousness of Christ being made ours, by which we are accounted and reputed as righteous before God.

This, therefore, is the righteousness and the manner of that justification, whereby I hope to stand before the judgment-seat of God, even by God's imputing my sins to Christ, and Christ's righteousness to me; looking upon me as one not to be punished for my sins, because Christ hath suffered; but to be received into the joys of glory, because Christ hath performed obedience for me, and does, by faith, through grace impute it to me. Bishop Beveridge

The righteousness of Christ is a glorious covering; to have all our sins laid upon the head of this scape-goat, and notwithstanding

rsonal unworthiness, to be accepted in the Beloved, is a pri

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1.) u redemption that is China Jeses. Aad this is not only the means

remember that that spotless robe will never be permitted to cover
an unsanctified beart. These only have reason to expect the benefit
of it that are found in Christ; ad if any man be in Cbrist, be is a
new creature.

Larington.
But in what sense is this righteousness imputed to believers ? In
this: All believers are forgiven and accepted, not for the sake of
any thing in them, or of any thing that ever was, that is, or ever
can be, done by them, but wholly and solely for the sake of what
Christ bath dope and suffered for them. I say again, not for the
sake of any thing in them, or done by them, of their own rights
ousness or works: - Not for works of righteousness which we have
done, but of his own seres be saved as.” “ By grace ye are saved
wholly and sold for the sake of what Christ hath done and sui
fered for as. We are justified freely by his grace, through the

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sin': Sermons, vol. i. 1. *
That jasties, un muted as die believer, is in Chris. A tem
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be clearer than trong vizess! Rom. iv. 6.“ David cute
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Cbrist's body, and shedding of Christ's blood, but also his perfect fulfilling of the law, are the adequate price of our redemption. All these act conjointly, they sweetly harmonize, in the great and glorious work. To suppose their disupion, is a doctrinal mistake, somewhat like that practical crror of the papists, in severing the sacramental wine from the sacramental bread; administering to the laity the symbols of the slaughtered body, but withholding the symbols of the streaming blood.

There are other clauses in the same bomily, which set the seal of the church to our sentiments. I shall content myself with transcribing one from the conclusion: “ Christ, says that form of sound words, is the righteousness of all them that do truly believe. He for them paid their ransom by his death. He for them fullilled the law in his life. So that now, in him, and by bim, every true Christian man may be called a fulfiller of the law; forasmuch as that which their infirmity lacked, Christ's righteousness bath supplied.” This authority is as clear, as the doctrine authorised is comfortable! May the former sway our judgment; may the latter cheer our bearts,

Hervey. It would have remained a puzzling question to men and angels, How should man be just with God? had not his grace employed bis wisdom to find out a ransom, whereby be has delivered his peon ple froin going down to the pit of corruption; wbich ransom is no other than bis own Son, whom he sent, in the fulness of time, to execute the scheme he had so wisely formed in his eternal mind; which he did, by finishing transgression, making an end of sin, making reconciliation for iniquity, and bringing in an everlasting righteousness, which being wrought out by Christ, God was well, pleased with, because hereby his law was magnified and made honourable; and, having graciously accepted of it, he imputes it freely to all bis people, and reckons them righteous on the account of it. The Hebrew word and the Greek words, which are used to express this act of imputation, signify to reckon, repute, estimate, attribute, or place any thing to the account of another; as when the apostle Paul said to Philemon, concerning Onesimus, “ If he hath wronged thee, or oweth thee aught, put that on my account;"

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Phil. 18. let it be reckoned or imputed to me. So, when God is
said to impute Christ's righteousness to us, the meaning is, that he
reckons it as ours, being wrought out for us; and accounts us
righteous by it, as though we had performed it in our own persons.
And that it may appear that we are justified by the righteous-
ness of Christ imputed to us, observe,

1. That we are in our own persons ungodly, who are justified;
for God justifieth the ungodly; Rom. iv. 5. if ungodly, then with-
out a righteousness, as all Adam's posterity are; and if without a
righteousness, then, if we are justified, it must be by some righteous-
ness imputed to us, or placed to our account, which can be no other
than the righteousness of Christ.

2. We are justified either by an inherent or by an imputed righteousness ; not by an inherent one, because that is imperfect, and nothing that is imperfect can justify us. Besides, this is a righteousness within us, whereas the righteousness by which we are justified is a righteousness without us; it is unto all and upon all them that believe. Rom. iii. 22. And if we are not justified by an inherent righteousness, then it must be by an imputed one, because there remains no other.

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3. The righteousness by which we are justified is not our own righteousness, but the righteousness of another-the righteousness of Christ, “That I may be found in Christ, (says the apostle) not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ. Phil. iii. 9. Now the righteousness of another cannot be made ours, or we be justified by it, any other way than by an imputation of it.

4. The same way that Adam's sin becomes ours, or we are made singers by it, the same way Christ's righteousness becomes ours, or we are made righteous by it. Now Adam's sin, becomes ours by imputation ; and so does Christ's righteousness, according to the Apostle : “ As by one man's disobedience many were made sinners; 80, by the obedience of one shall many be made righteous." Rom, v. 19,

6. The same way that our sins became Christ's, bis righteousness becomes ours. Now our sins became Christ's by imputation only;

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Christ's body, and shedding of Christ's blood, but also his perfect fulfilling of the law, are the adequate price of our redemption. All these act conjointly, they sweetly harmonize, in the great and glorious work. To suppose their disunion, is a doctrinal mistake, somewhat like that practical crror of the papists, in severing the sacramental wine from the sacramental bread; administering to the laity the symbols of the slaughtered body, but withholding the symbols of the streaming blood.

There are other clauses in the same bomily, which set the seal of the church to our sentiments. I shall content myself with transcribing one from the conclusion : " Christ, says that form of sound words, is the righteousness of all then that do truly believe. He for them paid their ransom by his death. He for them fulfilled the law in his life. So that now, in bim, and by him, every true Chris, tian man may be called a fulfiller of the law; forasīnuch as that which their infirmity lacked, Christ's righteousness bath supplied." This authority is as clear, as the doctrine authorised is comfortable! May the former sway our judgment; may the latter cheer our hearts,

* justi

Hervey It would have remained a puzzling question to men and angels, How should man be just with God? had not his grace employed his wisdom to find out a ransom, whereby he has delivered his peon ple from going down to the pit of corruption; wbich ransom is no other than his own Son, whom he sent, in the fulness of time, to execute the scheme he had so wisely formed in his eternal mind; which he did, by finishing transgression, making an end of sin, making reconciliation for iniquity, and bringing in an everlasting righteousness, which being wrought out by Christ, God was well, pleased with, because hereby his law was magnified and made honourable; and, having graciously accepted of it, be imputes it freely to all his people, and reckons them righteous on the account of it. The Hebrew word and the Greek words, which are used to express this act of imputation, signify to reckon, repute, estimate, attribute, or place any thing to the account of another; as when the apostle Paul said to Philemon, concerning Onesimus, " If he hath wronged thee, or oweth thee aught, put that on my account;"

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