U.S. Government Information Policies and Practices--the Pentagon Papers: Hearings Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-second Congress, First [and Second] Session[s].

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Page 14 - They believed that freedom to think as you will and to speak as you think are means indispensable to the discovery and spread of political truth; that without free speech and assembly discussion would be futile; that with them, discussion affords ordinarily adequate protection against the dissemination of noxious doctrine; that the greatest menace to freedom is an inert people; that public discussion is a political duty; and that this should be a fundamental principle of the American government.
Page 299 - ... the attendance and testimony of such witnesses and the production of such books, records, correspondence, memorandums, papers, and documents, as it deems necessary.
Page 245 - The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state ; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter, when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public ; to forbid this is to destroy the freedom of the press ; but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity.
Page 115 - Whoever, with intent or reason to believe that it is to be used to the injury of the United States or to the advantage of a foreign nation...
Page 491 - Restricted Data' means all data concerning (1) design, manufacture, or utilization of atomic weapons; (2) the production of special nuclear material ; or (3) the use of special nuclear material in the production of energy, but shall not include data declassified or removed from the Restricted Data category pursuant to section 142.
Page 33 - In each case [courts] must ask whether the gravity of the 'evil,' discounted by its improbability, justifies such invasion of free speech as is necessary to avoid the danger.
Page 435 - Information or material the defense aspect of which Is paramount, and the unauthorized disclosure of which could result In exceptionally grave damage to the Nation such as leading to a definite break In diplomatic relations affecting the defense of the United States, an armed attack against the United States or Its allies, a war, or the compromise of military or defense plans, or Intelligence operations, or scientific or technological developments vital to the national defense.
Page 14 - But they knew that order cannot be secured merely through fear of punishment for its infraction : that it is hazardous to discourage thought, hope and imagination ; that fear breeds repression, that repression breeds hate : that hate menaces stable government ; that the path of safety lies in the opportunity to discuss freely supposed grievances and proposed remedies; and that the fitting remedy for evil counsels is good ones.
Page 974 - security" is a broad, vague generality whose contours should not be invoked to abrogate the fundamental law embodied in the First Amendment. The guarding of military and diplomatic secrets at the expense of informed representative government provides no real security for our Republic.
Page 359 - As therefore it is perfectly clear to my understanding, that the assent of the House of Representatives is not necessary to the validity of a treaty...

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