Annual Report of the Commissioner of Patents, Part 2; Part 4

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1858 - Agriculture
Prior to 1862, when the Department of Agriculture was established, the report on agriculture was prepared and published by the Commissioner of Patents, and forms volume or part of volume, of his annual reports, the first being that of 1840. Cf. Checklist of public documents ... Washington, 1895, p. 148.

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Page 18 - Office for the district in which such land may lie, by legal subdivisions, any number of acres not exceeding one hundred and sixty, or a quarter section of land, to include the residence of such claimant, upon paying to the United States the minimum price of such land...
Page 18 - ... in trust for the several use and benefit of the inhabitants, according to their respective interests. By the act of the 3d of March, 1855, contractors carrying the mails through the Territories west of the Mississippi are authorized to preempt their stations, not more than one for every 20 miles of the route, to the extent of G40 acres at each station. In 1853...
Page 125 - The leaves having now lost a large portion of their moisture, and having become considerably reduced in size, are removed into the factory. They are put a second time into the roastingpan for three or four minutes, and taken out and rolled as before. The charcoal fires are now got ready. A tubular basket, narrow at the middle and wide at both ends, is placed over the fire. A sieve is dropped into this tube, and covered with leaves, which are shaken on it to about an inch in thickness.
Page 156 - Nor is the influence of the stock of an essentially different nature. In proportion as the scion and the stock approach each other closely in constitution, the less effect is produced by the latter ; and, on the contrary, in proportion to the constitutional difference between the stock and the scion, is the effect of the former important. Thus, when Pears are grafted or budded on the wild species, Apples upon Crabs, Plums upon Plums, and Peaches upon Peaches or Almonds, the scion is, in regard to...
Page 125 - ... fixed, that is, there is no longer any danger of their becoming black. They are of a dullish green colour, but become brighter afterwards.* The most particular part of the operation has now been finished, and the tea may be put aside until a larger quantity has been made. The second part of the process consists in winnowing and passing the tea through sieves of different sizes, in order to get rid of the dust and other impurities, and to divide the tea into the different kinds known as twankay,...
Page 18 - That from and after the passage of this act, every person being the head of a family, or widow, or single man, over the age of twenty-one years, and being a citizen of the United States, or having filed his declaration of intention to become a citizen, as required by the naturalization laws...
Page 143 - At one dollar per gallon, which is less than the value, it will give a profit of at least $400 per acre, or of $80,000 on the 200 acres in cultivation. One small vineyard at Hamburg, Mr. Joseph Stuby's, yielded over 1,000 gallons per acre. The entire cost of vineyards, preparing the soil, setting and training the vines till they come into bearing, varies from $200 to $300 per acre ; annual cost of cultivation after, fifty dollars to sixty dollars per acre ; ten per cent, on first cost, $20 to $30...
Page 125 - The next part of the process is exactly the same as in the manipulation of green tea. The leaves are thrown into an iron pan, where they are roasted for about five minutes, and then rolled upon the rattan table.
Page 69 - The bee observe; She too an artist is, and laughs at man, Who calls on rules the sightly hexagon With truth to form ; a cunning architect, Who at the roof begins her golden work, And builds without foundation.
Page 161 - ... of the ground without injury than if they were longer and more scattered among the soil. When destroyed, the spongioles are often speedily replaced, particularly in orchard trees, provided a slight degree of growth continues to be maintained. This is one of the reasons why trees removed in October succeed better than if transplanted at any other time. The growth of a tree at that season is not quite over ; and the first impulse of nature, when the tree finds itself in a new situation, is to create...

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