The Political History of England ...: Montague, F.C. From the accession of James I to the restoration (1603-1660)

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William Hunt
Longmans, Green and Company, 1907 - Great Britain

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Page 259 - May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me...
Page 477 - that according to the ancient and fundamental laws of this Kingdom, the government is, and ought to be, by King, Lords, and Commons.
Page 180 - I pray God bless him to carry it so that the Church may have honour, and the State service and content by it. And now, if the Church will not hold up themselves, under God I can do no more.
Page 11 - If you aim at a Scottish Presbytery, it agreeth as well with monarchy as God and the devil. Then Jack, and Tom, and Will, and Dick, shall meet, and at their pleasure censure me and my council, and all our proceedings ; then Will shall stand up and say, It must be thus ; then Dick shall reply, Nay, marry, but we will have it thus.
Page 76 - It is atheism and blasphemy to dispute what God can do; good Christians content themselves with his will revealed in his Word; so it is presumption and high contempt in a subject to dispute what a king can do; or to say that a king cannot do this or that; but rest in that which is the king's will revealed in his law.
Page 348 - And truly I desire their Liberty and Freedom, as much as any Body whomsoever ; but I must tell you, That their Liberty and Freedom consists in having of Government, those Laws by which their Life and their Goods may be most their own. It is not for having share in Government (Sirs) that is nothing pertaining to them. A Subject and a Sovereign are clean different things...
Page 16 - What cause we your poor Commons have to watch over our privileges is manifest in itself to all men. The prerogatives of princes may easily and do daily grow; the privileges of the subject are for the most part at an everlasting stand.
Page 237 - It was true, we give law to hares and deer, because they be beasts of chase ; but it was never accounted either cruelty, or foul play, to knock foxes and wolves on the head as they can be found, because they be beasts of prey.
Page 395 - O Sir Henry Vane, Sir Henry Vane, the Lord deliver me from Sir Henry Vane.
Page 259 - since I see all the birds are flown, I do expect from you that you shall send them unto me as soon as they return hither. But I assure you, on the word of a King, I never did intend any force, but shall proceed against them in a legal and fair way, for I never meant any other.

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