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THE

MICROSCOPE:

AND ITS

REVELATIONS.

I.

PRINCIPLES OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY.

A NEW AMERICAN, FROM THE FOURTH AND REVISED LONDON EDITION. With more than three hundred beautiful illustrations. In one large and handsome octavo volume of 752 pages.

Without pretending to it, it is an Ency- | could have brought to so successful an issue clopædia of the subject, accurate and complete in all respects-a truthful reflection of the advanced state at which the science has now arrived.-Dublin Quarterly Journal of Medical Science.

A truly magnificent work-in itself a perfect physiological study.-Ranking's Abstract.

This work stands without its fellow. It is one, few inen in Europe could have undertaken; it is one, no man, we believe,

II.

as Dr. Carpenter. We feel that this abstract can give the reader a very imperfect idea of the fulness of this work, and no idea of its unity, of the admirable manner in which material has been brought, from the most various sources, to conduce to its completeness, of the lucidity of the reasoning it contains, or of the clearness of language in which the whole is clothed.Medical Times.

PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY.

WITH THEIR CHIEF APPLICATIONS TO

PSYCHOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, THERAPEUTICS, HYGIENE, AND FORENSIC MEDICINE.

A new American, from the last and revised London Edition, with nearly three hundred illustrations. Edited, with additions, by F. Gurney Smith, M.D. In one large and handsome volume of about nine hundred pages.

The most complete work on the science in our language.-Am. Med. Journal.

The most complete work now extant in our language.-N. O. Med. Register.

The best text-book in the language on this extensive subject.-London Med. Times.

A complete cyclopædia of this branch of science.-N. Y. Med. Times.

The most complete exposition of physiology which any language can at present give.-Brit. and For. Med.-Chirurg. Review.

III.

ELEMENTS (OR MANUAL) OF PHYSIOLOGY.

INCLUDING PHYSIOLOGICAL ANATOMY.

Second American, from the last and revised London Edition, with one hundred and ninety illustrations. In one handsome octavo volume of 566 pages.

In his former works it would seem that he had exhausted the subject of Physiology. In the present, he gives the essence, as it were, of the whole.-N. Y. Journal of Medicine.

Those who have occasion for an elementary treatise on Physiology, cannot do better than to possess themselves of the manual of Dr. Carpenter.-Medical Examiner.

PREPARING.

PRINCIPLES OF GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY, including ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, and HISTOLOGY. With a general sketch of the Vegetable and Animal Kingdoms. With several hundred illustrations. In one large and handsome octavo volume.

In his last edition of the "Comparative Physiology" and "Human Physiology," the author found it desirable to omit the chapters connected with "General Physiology." He has therefore undertaken to prepare a volume devoted exclusively to that subject, forming an introduction to the other works, or, taken in conjunction with them, constituting a complete and extended system of Physiology, in all its branches.

(IC)

THE

MICROSCOPE:

AND ITS

REVELATIONS.

BY

WILLIAM B. CARPENTER, M.D., F.R.S., F.G.S.,

EXAMINER IN PHYSIOLOGY AND COMPARATIVE ANATOMY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON ;
PROFESSOR OF MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE IN UNIVERSITY COLLEGE;
PRESIDENT OF THE MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON; ETC.

WITH AN APPENDIX

CONTAINING THE

APPLICATIONS OF THE MICROSCOPE TO CLINICAL MEDICINE, ETC.

BY

FRANCIS GURNEY SMITH, M.D.,

PROFESSOR OF THE INSTITUTES OF MEDICINE

IN THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE, ETC.

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Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1856.

BY BLANCHARD AND LEA,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

C. SHERMAN & SON, PRINTERS,

19 St. James Street.

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PREFACE TO THE AMERICAN EDITION.

THE American Edition of Dr. Carpenter's Work has been reprinted with the Author's sanction, from advance sheets furnished by him to the American publishers. In assuming the supervision of the press, the Editor has been careful to leave the work as it came from the Author's hands. Such additions as seemed most required by the Students of this country have been made in the form of an Appendix. The reader will find Dr. Carpenter's reasons for omitting the Clinical Applications of the Microscope, fully detailed in his Preface; but as the various works on this subject are not readily accessible on this side of the Atlantic, it was thought that a selection from them, in a compendious form, might enhance the usefulness of the work. Free use has been made, therefore, of the excellent manuals of Beale and Bennett; and the various kindred treatises and journals have also been drawn upon. All that this portion of the work claims is to present a general view of those subjects which seem to be most required by the student of the Microscope. The growing interest in this important field of inquiry will, it is hoped, afford sufficient apology for its introduction.

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