A Midsummer Night's Dream

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Chatto & Windus, 1908 - Athens (Greece) - 134 pages
Mix-ups and mishaps occur when Oberon, the King of the Fairies, doses his sleeping wife with a magical potion that causes her to fall in love with the first living thing she sees upon awakening.
 

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User Review  - hitomik - LibraryThing

This is a love story which is sometimes serious and sometimes funny. At first I was a little confused because everything is written as lines in a play, but soon I got used to it. I liked the way this story ended, in which a character talked to me. Read full review

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User Review  - yukaw - LibraryThing

this is Shakespeare's comic play. Puck is a sprite and he likes playing a trick. this story is almost love story but pretty funny! I'm sure that you can have a good laugh!! Read full review

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Page 45 - That the graves, all gaping wide, Every one lets forth his sprite, In the church-way paths to glide : And we fairies, that do run By the triple Hecate's team, From the presence of the sun, Following darkness like a dream, Now are frolic ; not a mouse Shall disturb this hallow'd house : I am sent with broom before, To sweep the dust behind the door.
Page 10 - Hobgoblin call you, and sweet Puck, You do their work, and they shall have good luck : Are not you he ? Puck. Thou speak'st aright ; I am that merry wanderer of the night. I jest to Oberon, and make him smile, When I a fat and bean-fed horse beguile, Neighing in likeness of a filly foal : And sometime lurk I in a gossip's bowl, In very likeness of a roasted crab ; And when she drinks, against her lips I bob And on her withered dewlap pour the ale. The wisest aunt, telling the saddest tale, Sometime...
Page 26 - Have with our needles created both one flower, Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion, Both warbling of one song, both in one key ; As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds, Had been incorporate. So we grew together, Like to a double cherry, seeming parted, But yet a union in partition, Two lovely berries moulded on one stem : So, with two seeming bodies, but one heart ; Two of the first, like coats in heraldry, Due but to one, and crowned with one crest.
Page 14 - I know a bank where the wild thyme blows, Where ox-lips and the nodding violet grows ; Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, With sweet musk-roses, and with eglantine...
Page 7 - Over hill, over dale, Thorough bush, thorough brier, Over park, over pale, Thorough flood, thorough fire, I do wander everywhere, Swifter than the moon's sphere; And I serve the fairy queen, To dew her orbs upon the green. The cowslips tall her pensioners be: In their gold coats spots you see; Those be rubies, fairy favours, In those freckles live their savours: I must go seek some dewdrops here And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.
Page 16 - You spotted snakes with double tongue, Thorny hedgehogs, be not seen; Newts and blind-worms, do no wrong, Come not near our fairy queen. Chorus. Philomel, with melody Sing in our sweet lullaby; Lulla, lulla, lullaby; lulla, lulla, lullaby: Never harm, Nor spell nor charm, Come our lovely lady nigh; So, good night, with lullaby.
Page 34 - With purple grapes, green figs, and mulberries ; The honey-bags steal from the humble-bees, And, for night tapers, crop their waxen thighs, And light them at the fiery glow-worm's eyes...
Page 36 - Scratch my head, Peaseblossom. Where's Mounsieur Cobweb ? Cob. Ready. Bot. Mounsieur Cobweb, good mounsieur, get you your weapons in your hand, and kill me a red-hipped humble-bee on the top of a thistle ; and, good mounsieur, bring me the honey-bag.
Page 32 - I see their knavery : this is to make an ass of me ; to fright me, if they could. But I will not stir from this place, do what they can : I will walk up and down here, and I will sing, that they shall hear I am not afraid. [sings. The ousel-cock, so black of hue, With orange-tawny bill, The throstle with his note so true, The wren with little quill Tita.

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