Knowledge is Power: A View of the Productive Forces of Modern Society, and the Results of Labour, Capital, and Skill

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Gould and Lincoln, 1856 - Industrial arts - 503 pages
 

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Page 234 - The manner of the carriage is by laying rails of timber from the colliery down to the river, exactly straight and parallel ; and bulky carts are made with four rowlets fitting these rails ; whereby the carriage is so easy that one horse will draw down four or five chaldron of coals, and is an immense benefit to the coal merchants.
Page 405 - Because a great part of the people, and especially of workmen and servants, late died of the pestilence, many seeing the necessity of masters, and great scarcity of servants, will not serve unless they may receive excessive wages...
Page 281 - Here strip, my children! here at once leap in, Here prove who best can dash through thick and thin, And who the most in love of dirt excel, Or dark dexterity of groping well.
Page 189 - Jesus said unto him, No man, having put his hand to the plow, and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of God.
Page 23 - If the iron be blunt, and he do not whet the edge, then must he put to more strength: but wisdom is profitable to direct.
Page 264 - So doth the potter sitting at his work, And turning the wheel about with his feet, Who is alway carefully set at his work, And maketh all his work by number; He fashioneth the clay with his arm, And boweth down his strength before his feet; He applieth himself to lead it over; And he is diligent to make clean the furnace : All these trust to their hands: And every one is wise in his work.
Page 119 - The property which every man has in his own labor, as it is the original foundation of all other property, so it is the most sacred and inviolable.
Page 137 - One thynge I muche notyd in the hawle of Bolton, how chimeneys were conveyed by tunnells made on the syds of the walls betwyxt the lights in the hawle, and by this means, and by no covers, is the smoke of the harthe in the hawle wonder strangely conveyed.
Page 416 - The proprietors of lands keep great part of them in their own hands for sheep-pasture; and there are thousands of poor wretches who think themselves blessed, if they can obtain a hut worse than the squire's dog-kennel, and an acre of ground for a potatoplantation, on condition of being as very slaves as any in America. What can be more deplorable, than to behold wretches starving in the midst of plenty!
Page 338 - And as the fashions be rare and strange, so is the stuff whereof their hats be made divers also ; for some are of silk, some of velvet, some of...

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