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AN ACT MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE LEGISLATIVE
BRANCH FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1971, AND

FOR OTHER PURPOSES

Printed for the use of the Committee on Appropriations

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

42-807 0

WASHINGTON : 1970

13952

SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

JOSEPH M. MONTOYA, New Mexico, Chairman WILLIAM PROXMIRE, Wisconsin

JAMES B. PEARSON, Kansas RALPH YARBOROUGH, Texas

NORRIS COTTON, New Hampshire RICHARD B. RUSSELL, Georgla

MILTON R. YOUNG, North Dakota Chairman, Ex Officio

Ex Officio
THOMAS J. Scott, Clerk of the Subcommittee

EDMUND L. HARTUNG, Minority Counsel

(II)

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL

YEAR 1971

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 1970

U.S. SENATE,
SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS,

Washington, D.C. The subcommittee met at 10 a.m., in room 1223, New Senate Office Building, Hon. Joseph M. Montoya (chairman) presiding.

Present: Senators Montoya, Cotton, and Young.

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

STATEMENT OF JAMES L. HARRISON, PUBLIC PRINTER

ACCOMPANIED BY:
HARRY J. HUMPHREY, ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TO THE

PUBLIC PRINTER
CARPER W. BUCKLEY, SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS
ROWLAND E. DARLING, DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCU-
MENTS

ENCOMIUM FOR MR. HARRISON

Senator MONTOYA. The subcommittee will be in session.

Today we will hear the testimony in support of the budget request for the Government Printing Office, and we are pleased to have with us, to present his statement and answer any questions, the Public Printer, Mr. James L. Harrison, who is accompanied by several of his associates.

I want to say at the very outset of the hearing that Mr. Harrison is leaving his position as Public Printer, and I want to commend him for the kind of public service he has rendered as Public Printer.

Since 1961, Jím Harrison has directed the GPO with distinction. I personally regret his leaving as will all who had the opportunity to observe his many abilities, and his capable direction and also his willingness to cooperate with the Congress.

I know I speak for all of my colleagues and I wish him well in his new venture in life and I want to have the record state at this point on behalf of myself and the committee that Mr. Harrison has comported himself as a dedicated public servant. He has brought great credit to the Government Printing Office during his tenure and under his direction.

Mr. Harrison, you may proceed to make your statement.

Mr. HARRISON. Thank you very much Senator for those kind words. I will miss this opportunity to appear before your committee very much.

PRINTING AND BINDING VOLUME GROWTH

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the committee, during fiscal year 1969, the volume of printing and binding handled by the Government Printing Office amounted to over $203,600,000. This was $3,600,000 higher than the record-setting volume of 1967, when our volume amounted to about $200 million. For fiscal year 1961, the year in which I took office, the volume was only $97,700,000. You can readily see the tremendous growth during this 9-year period. Our procurement of printing and binding from commercial sources also continues to increase and amounted to 56.7 percent of our total in 1969 as compared to 55.9 percent in 1968, 55.1 percent in 1967, and only 42.5 percent in 1961. When the plan proposed by the Joint Committee on Printing regarding the commercial procurement of some $33 million of printing presently being produced in agency field printing plants is fully implemented, the percent of commercially procured printing should rise sharply during the next several years.

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD

The Congressional Record—at the same time our largest and most important product-required 33,766 pages to cover the proceedings of the second session of the 90th Congress while the first session of the 91st Congress needed 43,518 pages. This same pattern has been reflected in varying degrees throughout our workload and understandably has severely taxed our facilities, our personnel, and our financing.

WORKING CAPITAL

In connection with our financing it is necessary that I request additional working capital in the amount of $20 million in order to operate. I have a detailed statement to justify this request which I would like to discuss after we have completed the congressional printing and binding appropriation requests.

OVERTIME

MANPOWER

MANAGEMENT

INCREASE-ESTABLISHMENT OF

CONTROL BOARD

In connection with our personnel, the heavy workload and crowded space has made our mission extremely difficult. While our program of modernizing machinery and equipment has been a big help in speeding up production, we have still been forced to work more overtime this year than ever before.

I have recently established a Manpower Management and Control Board which should further assist us in increasing production.

INCREASED APPRENTICES

In addition, I am pleased to report that in December of 1969 the Congress passed legislation (Public Law 91–167) which increases the

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