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66 Stat. 718. 47 USC 402.

Delegates, qualifications, etc.

5 USC 1001 note.

(7) The filing of an application for review under this subsection Judicial review. shall be a condition precedent to judicial review of any order, decision, report, or action made or taken pursuant to a delegation under paragraph (í). The time within which a petition for review must be filed in a proceeding to which section 402(a) applies, or within which an appeal must be taken under section 402(b), shall be computed from the date upon which public notice is given of orders disposing of all applications for review filed in any case.

“(8) The employees to whom the Commission may delegate review functions in any case of adjudication (as defined in the Administrative Procedure Act) shall be qualified, by reason of their training, experience, and competence, to perform such review functions, and shall perform no duties inconsistent with such review functions. Such employees shall be in a grade classification or salary level commensurate with their important duties, and in no event less than the grade classification or salary level of the employee or employees whose actions are to be reviewed. In the performance of such review functions such employees shall be assigned to cases in rotation so far as practicable and shall not be responsible to or subject to the supervision or direction of any officer, employee, or agent engaged in the performance of investigative or prosecuting functions for any agency.

"(9) The secretary and seal of the Commission shall be the secretary and seal of each panel of the Commission, each individual commissioner, and each employee board or individual employee exercising functions delegated pursuant to paragraph (1) of this subsection.

Sec. 3. Section 405 of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, is hereby amended to read as follows:

Secretary and seal.

47 USC 405.

“REHEARINGS

Ante, p. 420.

"Sec. 405. After an order, decision, report, or action has been made or taken in any proceeding by the Commission, or by any designated authority within the Commission pursuant to a delegation under section 5(d) (1), any party thereto, or any other person aggrieved or whose interests are adversely affected thereby, may petition for rehearing only to the authority making or taking the order, decision, report, or action; and it shall be lawful for such authority, whether it be the Commission or other authority designated under section 5 (d)(1), in its discretion, to grant such a rehearing if sufficient reason therefor be made to appear. A petition for rehearing must be filed within thirty days from the date upon which public notice is given of the order, decision, report, or action complained of. No such application shall excuse any person from complying with or obeying any order, decision, report, or action of the Commission, or operate in any manner to stay or postpone the enforcement thereof, without the special order of the Commission. The filing of a petition for rehearing shall not be a condition precedent to judicial review of any such order, decision, report, or action, except where the party seeking such review (1) was not a party to the proceedings resulting in such order, decision, report, or action, or (2) relies on questions of fact or law upon which the Commission, or designated authority within the Commission, has been afforded no opportunity to pass. The Commission, or designated authority within the Commission, shall enter an order, with a concise statement of the reasons therefor, denying a petition for rehearing or granting such petition, in whole or in part, and ordering such further proceedings as may be appropriate: Provided, That in any case where such petition relates to an instrument of authorization granted without a hearing, the Commission, or desig

47 USC 402.

Hearings.
66 Stat. 721.
47 USC 409.

nated authority within the Commission, shall take such action within ninety days of the filing of such petition. Rehearings shall be governed by such general rules as the Commission may establish, except that no evidence other than newly discovered evidence, evidence which has become available only since the original taking of evidence, or evidence which the Commission or designated authority within the Commission believes should have been taken in the original proceeding shall be taken on any rehearing. The time within which a petition for review must be filed in a proceeding to which section 402(a) applies, or within which an appeal must be taken under section 102 (b) in any case, shall be computed from the date upon which public notice is given of orders disposing of all petitions for rehearing filed with the Commission in such proceeding or case, but any, order, decision, report, or action made or taken after such rehearing reversing, changing, or modifying the original order shall be subject to the same provisions with respect to rehearing as an original order."

SEC. 4. Section 409 (a), (b), (c), and (d) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, are amended to read as follows:

"(a) In every case of adjudication (as defined in the Administrative 5 USC 1001 note. Procedure Act) which has been designated by the Commission for

hearing, the person or persons conducting the hearing shall prepare and file an initial, tentative, or recommended decision, except where such person or persons become unavailable to the Commission or where the Commission finds upon the record that due and timely execution of its functions imperatively and unavoidably require that the record

be certified to the Commission for initial or final decision. Exceptions. “(b) In every case of adjudication (as defined in the Administrative

Procedure Act) which has been designated by the Commission for hearing, any party to the proceeding shall be permitted to file exceptions and memoranda in support thereof to the initial, tentative, or recommended decision, which shall be passed upon by the Commission or by the authority within the Commission, if any, to whom the function of passing upon the exceptions is delegated under section 5(d) (1): Provided, however, That such authority shall not be the same authority which made the decision to which the exception is taken.

"(c) (1) In any case of adjudication (as defined in the Administrative Procedure Act) which has been designated by the Commission for a hearing, no person who has participated in the presentation or preparation for presentation of such case at the hearing or upon review shall (except to the extent required for the disposition of ex parte matters as authorized by law) directly or indirectly make any additional presentation respecting such case to the hearing officer or officers or to the Commission, or to any authority within the Commission to whom, in such case, review functions have been delegated by the Commission under section 5(d) (1), unless upon notice and opportunity for all parties to participate.

“(2) The provision in subsection (c) of section 5 of the Administrative Procedure Act which states that such subsection shall not apply in determining applications for initial licenses, shall not be applicable hereafter in the case of applications for initial licenses before the Federal Communications Commission.

"(d) To the extent that the foregoing provisions of this section and section 5(d) are in conflict with the provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act, such provisions of this section and section 5(d) shall be held to supersede and modify the provisions of that Act.”

Sec. 5. Notwithstanding the foregoing provisions of this Act, the second sentence of subsection (b) of section 409 of the Communications Act of 1934 (which relates to the filing of exceptions and the presentation of oral argument), as in force at the time of the enact

5 USC 100 4.

ment of this Act, shall continue to be applicable with respect to any case of adjudication (as defined in the Administrative Procedure Act) designated by the Federal Communications Commission for hearing by a notice of hearing issued prior to the date of the enactment of this Act.

Approved August 31, 1961.

Public Law 87-193

AN ACT
To authorize the Secretary of the Interior to provide water and sewage disposal

facilities to the Medora area adjoining the Theodore Roosevelt National
Memorial Park, North Dakota, and for other purposes.

August 31, 1961

(S. 98]

Medora, N. Dak. Water and sewage facilities.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in order to Theodore Roose afford adequate facilities to persons visiting Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park, National Memorial Park, and to enhance the setting of the park en- N. Dak. trance and further the interpretive program of the park through encouraging the preservation and restoration of the pioneer cattle town of Medora, North Dakota, and its associations with Theodore Roosevelt, by non-Federal endeavors in accordance with house concurrent resolutions "T” and “U” of the 1959 Session Laws of the State of North Dakota, pages 878 and 879, the Secretary of the Interior is authorized to modernize the water and sewage facilities of the village of Medora adjoining the park, in the manner hereinafter provided.

SEC. 2. The Secretary of the Interior is authorized to construct, operate, and maintain, on rights-of-way donated for the purpose and in such manner as he shall consider to be in the public interest, water supply and sewage disposal systems to serve Federal and non-Federal properties in the said Medora area, and he may make existing Federal systems available to serve such properties: Provided, That nonFederal users of the systems shall comply with standards of use prescribed by the Secretary and shall be charged rates sufficient to recover a pro rata share of depreciation and costs of operation and maintenance of the systems plus interest on the Federal investment in the systems. Funds obtained from such non-Federal users of the systems shall be deposited in the Treasury of the United States as miscellaneous receipts, with the exception that the Secretary may consider as appropriation reimbursements, to be credited in the appropriation current at the time received, such amount of the aforesaid collections as may be necessary to reimburse, on a pro rata basis, appropriated operating funds expended for maintenance and operation costs of the systems.

Sec. 3. Construction of the facilities authorized herein shall not Conditions for be undertaken or use of existing Federal systems authorized until at least 80 per centum of the potential non-Federal users, as defined by the Secretary of the Interior, are committed to connecting to said water and sewage systems and until there shall have been reached an agreement with the duly authorized officials of the village of Medora, by which the village is obligated to adopt and enforce a zoning ordinance which complies with standards prescribed by the Secretary for the purpose of preserving the historic character of Medora and affording a park-like setting in the vicinity of the park and the entrance thereto.

Sec. 4. There are authorized to be appropriated for the construction Appropriation. of these facilities such sums as may be required therefor, not to exceed $100,000.

Approved August 31, 1961.

construction.

September 1, 1961

(H. R. 7809]

Public Law 87-194

AN ACT
To improve the active duty promotion opportunity of Air Force officers from the

grade of major to the grade of lieutenant colonel.

cers,

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Air Force offl- United States of America in Congress assembled, That, during the

period beginning on the date of enactment of this Act and ending at the close of June 30, 1963, any authorized strength prescribed for the grade of lieutenant colonel by or under section 8202 of title 10, United States Code, may be exceeded by not more than four thousand.

Approved September 1, 1961.

70 A Stat. 498.

September 4, 1961

(S. 1983)

Public Law 87-195

AN ACT
To promote the foreign policy, security, and general welfare of the United States

by assisting peoples of the world in their efforts toward economic development
and internal and external security, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the The Foreign As, United States of America in Congress assembled,

sistance Act of 1961.

Post, p. 719.

PART I

CHAPTER 1-SHORT TITLE AND POLICY

Act for International Develope ment of 1961.

Sec. 101. SHORT TITLE.—This part may be cited as the "Act for International Development of 1961".

Sec. 102. STATEMENT OF POLICY.- It is the sense of the Congress that peace depends on wider recognition of the dignity and interdependence of men, and survival of free institutions in the United States can best be assured in a worldwide atmosphere of freedom.

To this end, the United States has in the past provided assistance to help strengthen the forces of freedom by aiding peoples of less developed friendly countries of the world to develop their resources and improve their living standards, to realize their aspirations for justice, education, dignity, and respect as individual human beings, and to establish responsible governments.

The Congress declares it to be a primary necessity, opportunity, and responsibility of the United States, and consistent with its traditions and ideals, to renew the spirit which lay behind these past efforts, and to help make a historic demonstration that economic growth and political democracy can go hand in hand to the end that an enlarged community of free, stable, and self-reliant countries can reduce world tensions and insecurity.

It is the policy of the United States to strengthen friendly foreign countries by encouraging the development of their free economic institutions and productive capabilities, and by minimizing or elimi. nating barriers to the flow of private investment capital.

In addition, the Congress declares that it is the policy of the United States to support the principles of increased economic cooperation and trade among countries, freedom of the press, information, and religion, freedom of navigation in international waterways, and recognition of the right of all private persons to travel and pursue their lawful activities without discrimination as to race or religion. In the administration of all parts of this Act these principles shall be supported in such a way in our relations with countries friendly to the United States which are in controversy with each other as to promote an adjudication of the issues involved by means of international law procedures available to the parties.

Accordingly, the Congress hereby affirms it to be the policy of the United States to make assistance available, upon request, under this part in scope and on a basis of long-range continuity essential to the creation of an environment in which the energies of the peoples of the world can be devoted to constructive purposes, free of pressure and erosion by the adversaries of freedom. It is the sense of the Congress that assistance under this part should be complemented by the furnishing under any other Act of surplus agricultural commodities and by disposal of excess property under this and other Acts.

Also, the Congress reaffirms its conviction that the peace of the world and the security of the United States are endangered so long as international communism continues to attempt to bring under Communist domination peoples now free and independent and to keep under domination peoples once free but now subject to such domination. It is, therefore, the policy of the United States to continue to make available to other free countries and peoples, upon request, assistance of such nature and in such amounts as the United States deems advisable and as may be effectively used by free countries and peoples to help them maintain their freedom. Assistance shall be based upon sound plans and programs; be directed toward the social as well as economic aspects of economic development; be responsive to the efforts of the recipient countries to mobilize their own resources and help themselves; be cognizant of the external and internal pressures which hamper their growth; and should emphasize long-range development assistance as the primary instrument of such growth.

The Congress reaffirms its belief in the importance of regional organizations of free peoples for mutual assistance, such as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the European Economic Community, the Organization of American States, the Colombo Plan, the South East Asia Treaty Organization, the Central Treaty Organization, and others, and expresses its hope that such organizations may be strengthened and broadened, and their programs of self-help and mutual cooperation may be made more effective in the protection of the independence and security of free people, and in the development of their economic and social well-being, and the safeguarding of their basic rights and liberties.

Finally, the Congress urges that all other countries able to contribute join in a common undertaking to meet the goals stated in

this part.

64207 0-62-30

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