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(2) six hundred thousand participants on or before

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(4) one million two hundred thousand participants 6 during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1972. 7 (b) For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of 8 title II of this Act there are hereby authorized to be appro9 priated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1969, and for 10 each succeeding fiscal year such sums as may be necessary 11 to assure the employment of not less than12

(1) one hundred and fifty thousand participants on

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(3) six hundred thousand participants on or before

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June 30, 1971; and

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(4) one million two hundred thousand participants

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19 on or before June 30, 1972.

(c) Appropriations authorized by this section shall 21 remain available until expended.

90TH CONGRESS

20 SESSION

S. 3249

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

March 28 (legislative day, March 27), 1968 Mr. Javits (for himself, Mr. ALLOTT, Mr. BROOKE, Mr. Case, Mr. COOPER, Mr.

HANSEN, Mr. HATFIELD, Mr. Kuchel, Mr. Morton, Mr. Pearson, Mr. PERCY, Mr. PROUTY, and Mr. Scotr) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare

A BILL To provide a comprehensive national manpower policy, to

improve the Manpower Development and Training Act of 1962, to authorize a community service employment program, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa2 tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 3 That this Act may be cited as the “National Manpower Act 4 of 1968".

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9 SEC. 101. Section 101 of the Manpower Development 10 and Training Act of 1962 is amended to read as follows:

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1 "FINDINGS AND DECLARATION OF NATIONAL MANPOWER

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POLICY

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"SEC. 101. (a) The Congress hereby finds that the full 4 promise of American life and prosperity is denied to many 5 persons in many communities due to severe problems of 6 unemployment and underemployment. Numerous individuals,

7 many of whom live in trapped-in economically depressed 8 rural and urban areas, are unable to obtain jobs in regular

9 competitive employment because of (1) lack of education, 10 occupational skill, or work experience, (2) the existence

11 of artificial barriers to employment and occupational advance

12 ment, and (3) a continuing process of automation and tech13 nological change which renders obsolete many traditional

14 skills. An even larger number are underemployed, carning 15 a marginal existence in low-skilled occupations character16 ized by substandard wages, great uncertainty of tenure, little

17 chance for advancement, and low social status. While these

18 problems of unemployment and underemployment affect all 19 racial groups, they afflict non white Americans in dispropor20 tionately great numbers and in a manner which this Nation 21 cannot permit to continue. This situation has been seriously 22 aggravated by a process of urbanization in which unskilled 23 rural residents have migrated to central city areas even while 24 many businesses and places of employment are leaving those 25 areas. This migration of people and jobs is overwhelming

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1 current job training and job development programs in the 2 urban centers and is undermining the economic potential of

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“ (b) The Congress further finds that there is a critical

5 need for more and better trained personnel in many vital

6 occupational categories, including professional, scientific, 7 technical, and public service occupations. At the same time 8 there is a huge need for additional public services and public 9 facilities in such fields as those which (1) contribute to the 10 development of human potential, (2) better the conditions 11 under which people live, learn, and work, and (3) aid in the 12 development and conservation of natural resources.

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"(c) The Congress hereby declares that the welfare

14 and security of the Nation require a commitment by it to a 15 policy and program devoted to the elimination of poverty and 16 blight in the United States. An essential element in that

17 program must be a comprehensive national manpower policy 18 designed to assure to all citizens an opportunity for useful 19 work and training which will promote self-sufficiency and 20 enhance personal dignity. The policy to be followed in at21 taining the national manpower objective hereby established 22 shall be founded upon the following principles:

“(1) that private enterprise has the basic responsi24 bility and maximum ability to provide job training and

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“(2) that Government assistance should, in the

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first instance, be used to encourage private enterprise

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to serve more of the total need and to otherwise com

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plement private effort through education, training, job development, upgrading skills, and other supportive as

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sistance; and

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“ (3) that the residual responsibilities of Government shall include the development of meaningful em

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ployment opportunities in public service activities in

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order to fulfill critical needs and further to relieve

11 unemployment. 12 The Congress further recognizes that there are numerous 13 individuals who, by reasons of age, health, or other involun

14 tary disability, cannot be helped through an employment 15 or training program and for whom some form of income

16 maintenance is necessary."

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JOB VACANCY AND LABOR SUPPLY INFORMATION

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SEC. 102. Section 106 of the Manpower Development

19 and Training Act of 1962 is amended to read as follows:

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“JOB VACANCY AND LABOR SUPPLY INFORMATION

21 “SEC. 106. (a) The Secretary of Labor is directed, 22 using every appropriate facility, to develop, compile, and

23 make available information regarding skill requirements,

24 occupational outlook, job opportunities, labor supply in

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