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for the use of the Members of the Senate, and six thousand one hundred and fifty copies for the use of the Members of the House of Representatives.-R. S., sec. 3798, as modified by Stats. L., vol. 25, p. 610; infra.

There shall be printed of the Journals of the Senate, one thousand and fifty-five copies, and of the Journals of the House of Representatives, one thousand one hundred and sev. enty-four copies.

Of the Senate Journals there shall be bound one thousand and twenty-five copies, which shall be distributed as follows: To the office of the Secretary of the Senate, seventy-eight copies; to the Senate library, thirty-six copies; to the Senate document room, twenty-five copies; to the Senate folding room, forty-three copies; to the House document room, three hundred and thirty-seven copies; to the Department of State, ten copies; to the Department of the Interior, four hundred and thirty-five copies; to the Library of Congress, fifty-two copies; to the Court of Claims, two copies, and to the library of the House of Representatives, seven copies.

Of the Journals of the House of Representatives there shall be bound eleven hundred and twenty-four copies, which shall be distributed as follows: To the office of the Secretary of the Senate, seventy-eight copies; to the Senate library, thirty-six copies; to the Senate document room, twenty-five copies; to the document room of the House of Representatives, three hundred and forty-eight copies; to the Department of State, ten copies; to the Department of the Interior, four hundred and thirty-five copies; to the Clerk of the House of Repre. sentatives (for governors of States), one hundred and twentythree copies; to the Library of Congress, fifty-two copies; to the Court of Claims, two copies, and to the library of the House of Representatives, fifteen copies.

Of the unbound Journals of the Senate there shall be printed thirty copies, which shall be distributed as follows: To the Secretary of the Senate, six copies; to the office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives, five copies; to the document room of the House of Representatives, five copies; to the Public Printer, four copies; to the library of the House of Representatives (for file copies) five copies; and to the library of the Senate (for file copies), five copies.

Of the unbound Journals of the House of Representatives there shall be printed fifty copies, which shall be distributed as follows: To the Secretary of the Senate, six copies; to the office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives, twenty-five copies; to the document room of the House of Representatives, five copies; to the Public Printer, four copies; to the library of the House of Representatives (for file copies), five copies, and to the library of the Senate (for file copies), five copies. October 19, 1888.)- Stats. at L., vol. 25, p. 61011.

[All laws in conflict with the foregoing act fixing the number of Journals to be printed are by it repealed.]

The first edition of the Congressional Directory for each session shall be printed and ready for distribution within one week after the commencement thereof.R. S., sec. 3801.

The Congressional (Public) Printer shall, on the first day of each session, or as soon thereafter as may be practicable, report to Congress the exact condition, and the amount and cost, of public printing, binding, lithographing, and engraving; the amount and cost of all paper purchased for the same; a de. tailed statement of proposals made and contracts entered into for the purchase of paper and other materials, and for lithographing and engraving; of all payments made, during the preceding year, under his direction; of the amount of work ordered and done, with a general classification thereof, for each Department, and a detailed statement of each account with the Departments or public officers; a detailed statement of the number of hands employed in the establishment, and the time each has been employed; and such further information, touch ing all matters connected with the Printing Office, as may be in his possession.-R. S., sec. 3821.

The Congressional [Public) Printer shall also submit to Congress, at the beginning of each session, detailed estimates of the sims required for the support of the Government Printing Office.-R. S., sec. 3822.

The Congressional (Public) Printer is required to make annually a detailed report of expenditures on account of the Con. gressional Record.- Stats, at L., vol. 18, p. 288.

The reports of committees, the evidence and papers submitted therewith, or any part thereof, printed by order of Con

gress, may be reprinted at the Public Printing Office, at the instance of Senators, Representatives, and Delegates in Congress, upon payment in advance to the Public Printer of the cost thereof with ten per centum added, the same as if originally printed in the Congressional Record.--Stats, at L., lol, 24, p. 341.

The scientific reports known as the monographs and bulletins of the Geological Survey shall not be published until specific and detailed estimates are made therefor, and specific ap. propriations made in pursuance of such estimates; and no engraving for the annual reports, or for such monographs and bulletins, or of illustrations, sections, and maps, shall be done until specific estimates are submitted therefor and specific appropriations made based on such estimates. And no more than an allotment of one-half of the sum hereby appropriated shall be expended in the two first quarters of the fiscal year, and no more than one-fourth thereof may be.expended in either of the two last quarters of the fiscal year, except that, in addition thereto, in either of said last quarters, the unexpended balances of allotments for preceding quarters may be expended.- Stats. at L., vol. 24, p. 341.

The annual reports of the Smithsonian Institution shall be hereafter printed at the Government Printing Office, in the same manner as the annual reports of the heads of Departments are now printed, for submission in print to the two Houses of Congress. (March 3, 1885.]-Stats. at L., vol. 23, p. 520.

PRIORITY OF BUSINESS.

“All questions relating to the priority of business to be acted on shall be decided by a majority without debate.”Rule XXV.

The previous question having been ordered on the third reading of two bills, and the same coming up on a subsequent day as unfinished business, the bill which has been first considered is first in order. The question of consideration may, however, be raised inasmuch as the House should have the right to determine which bill should be first considered.Congressional Record, 1, 48, p. 5543.

Two bills being made special orders for the same day, neither

has precedence over the other, and the measure first called up is first in order.-Congressional Record 1, 49, p. 4543.

On Fridays the consideration of private business previously reported from the Committee of the Whole House takes precedeuce over the motion to resolve into Committee of the Whole House to consider private business.-Congressional Record 1, 51, p. 2237; Journal, 2, 52, p. 33.

The motion to resolve into Committee of the Whole to consider general appropriation bills and the motion to resolve into Committee of the Whole to consider revenue bills are of equal privilege, and such motions being submitted, the motion first made should be first put.-Journal, 2, 52, p. 108.

When a question is under debate no motion shall be received but to fix the day to which the House shall adjourn, to adjourn, to take a recess, to lay on the table, for the previous question (which motions shall be decided without debate), to postpone to a day certain, to refer or amend, or to postpone indefinitely, which several motions shall have precedence in the foregoing order; and no motion to postpone to a day certain, to refer, or to postpone indefinitely, being decided, shall be again allowed on the same day at the same stage of the question.—Rule XVI, clause 4. When any one of the foregoing motions is received, another of lower dignity can not be entertained until the former is disposed of. (See Privileged questions.)

PRIVATE BILLS. DISTINCTION BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE BILLS.

The line of distinction between public and private bills is so difficult to be defined in many cases that it must rest on the opinion of the Speaker and the details of the bill. It has been the practice in Parliament, and also in Congress, to consider as private such as are “for the interest of individuals, public companies or corporations, a parish, city, or county, or other locality.”). To be a private bill, it must not be general in its enactments, but for the particular interest or benefit of a person or persons. A pension bill for the relief of a soldier's widow is a private bill; but a bill granting pensions to such persons as a class, instead of as individuals, is a public bill. Bills for the incorporation of companies, whose operations are confined within the District of Columbia, have been treated as private; but where such companies are authorized to have agencies and transact business outside of the limits of the District, they are treated as public. Bills granting lands for railroads have always been held to be public; while a bill authorizing the extension of a railroad into the District of Columbia, or conferring certain privileges upon such a corporation, has been held to be private.

A bill authorizing individuals to construct a canal, to collect tolls thereon, and imposing penalties for certain violations of its provisions, was held to be a public, not a private bill. Journal, 2, 44, p. 460.

Bills frequently contain provisions of a public character, which at the same time are designed to benefit or promote private enterprises. It is difficult in such cases to determine with uniformity in which category these bills should be classed.

Bills authorizing the construction of bridges, and bills granting the right of way to railroads through Indian, military, or other reservations, have frequently been treated as private, while similar bills have at other times been considered to be public bills. These bills partake of both a public and a private character, and it is perhaps an open question whether they should be placed on the public or the private calendar.

Bills for the payment of money to counties or cities are held to be private, while similar bills for the benefit of States or Territories are held to be public.

It is not in order to so amend a private bill as to convert it into a public bill.—Journal, 1, 19, p. 571. Nor by extending its provisions to an individual vot affected by the bill as originally introduced.—Journal, 1, 19, pp. 702, 703.

An amendment proposing general provisions of law upon a private bill is not germane and not in order.—Journal, 1, 52, p. 312.

INTRODUCTION AND REFERENCE OF, AND REPORTS UPON.

Private bills are introduced by delivering them to the Clerk with the name of the Member introducing them indorsed thereon and the reference or disposition to be made thereof. See Rule XXII, clause 1.

All reports of committees on private bills, together with the

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