Page images
PDF
EPUB

contracts shall be awarded by them to the lowest and best bidder for the interest of the Government; but they shall not consider any proposal which is not accompanied by satisfactory evidence that the person making it is a manufacturer of or dealer in the description of paper which he proposes to furnish.—R. S., sec. 3770.

No contract for furnishing paper shall be valid until it has been approved by the joint committee, if made under their direction, or by the Secretary of the Interior, if made under his direction, according to the provisions of section thirty-seven hundred and seventy-five.-R. S., sec. 3772.

In case of difference of opinion between the Congressional [Public] Printer and any contractor for paper, respecting its quality, the matter of difference shall be determined by the Joint Committee on Public Printing.-R. S., sec. 3774.

If any contractor shall fail to comply with his contract, either as to time of delivery, or as to quantity, quality, or weight of paper, the Congressional (Public) Printer shall report such result to the Joint Committee on Public Printing, when Congress is in session, or to the Secretary of the Interior, when Congress is not in session; and he shall, under the direction of the committee, or of the Secretary of the Interior, as the case may be, enter into a new contract with the lowest and best bidder for the interest of the Government, among those whose proposals were rejected at the last opening of bids; or he shall advertise for new proposals, under the regulations herembefore stated; and during the interval which may thus occur, he shall, under the direction of the Joint Committee on Public Printing, or of the Secretary of the Interior as above provided, purchase in open market, at the lowest market price, all paper necessary for the public printing.-R. S., sec, 3775.

The Joint Committee on Public Printing, or, during the recess of Congress, the Secretary of the Interior, may authorize the Congressional [Public] Printer to make purchases of paper in open market, whenever they may deem the quantity required so small, or the want so immediate, as not to justify advertisement for proposals.-R. S., sec. 3778.

The Joint Committee on the Public Printing * * * is authorized to give permission to the Public Printer to purchase material in open market, whenever in their opinion it would

not promote the public interest to advertise for proposals and to make contracts for the same: Provided, however, That the purchases authorized by this act shall not in any term of six months exceed the sum of fifty dollars for any particular article required.-20 Stat. L., p. 22.

Whenever any charts, maps, diagrams, views, or other en. gravings are required, to illustrate any document ordered to be printed by either House of Congress, such engraving shall be procured by the Congressional (Public) Printer, under the direction and supervision of the Committee on Printing of the House ordering the same.—R. S., sec. 3779.

When the probable total cost of the maps or plates accompanying one work or document exceeds one thousand two hundred dollars, the lithographing or engraving thereof shall be awarded to the lowest and best bidder, after advertisement by the Congressional (Public Printer, under the direction of the Joint Committee on Public Printing. But the committee may authorize him to make immediate contracts for lithographing or engraving whenever, in their opinion, the exigencies of the public service do not justify advertisements for proposals.-R. S., sec. 3780, as amended by act of February 12, 1883, 22 Stat. L., p. 414.

Whenever it becomes necessary for the Public Printer to make purchases of material not already due under contracts, he shall prepare a schedule of the articles required, showing the description, quantity, and quality of each article, and shall invite proposals for furnishing the same either by advertisement or circular, as the Joint Committee on Public Printing may direct, and shall make contracts for the same with the lowest responsible bidder, making a return of the same to the Joint Committee on Public Printing, showing the number of bidders, the amounts of each bid, and the awards of the contracts.-Sess. Laws, 1, 44, p. 105.

No printing or binding which is not provided for by law shall be executed at the Government Printing Office.-R. S., sec. 3785.

No binding shall be done at the Government Printing Office for Senators, Representatives, or Delegates in Congress, except that there may be bound for each Senator, Representative, or

Delegate one copy of each book or document issued by order of Congress, but this provission shall not allow any binding as aforesaid to be done of books, or documents issued by authority of and during any former Congress.Stats. at L., vol. 22, p. 334.

There may be bound for each Senator, Representative, or Delegate in Congress, one copy of each book or document issued or ordered by authority of Congress during the term of service of such Senator, Representative, or Delegate; but this provision shall not be construed as allowing any binding as aforesaid to be done of any books or documents issued during any former Congress of which said Senator, Representative, or Delegate was not a member.- Stats, at L., vol. 29, pp. 629, 630.

It shall be lawful for the Congressional [Public) Printer to print and deliver, upon the order of any Senator or Member of the House of Representatives, or Delegate, extracts from the Congressional Record, the person ordering the same paying the cost thereof.-- Stats. at L., vol. 18, p. 347.

No binding shall be done for any department of the Government except in plain sheep or cloth, and no books shall be printed and bound except when the same shall be ordered by Congress or are authorized by law, except record and account books which may be bound in Russia leather, sheep fleshers, and skivers, when authorized by the head of a department, and this restriction shall not apply to the Congressional Library nor to the Libraries of the Surgeon-General's office, the Patent Office, and the State Departinent.Stats. at L., vol. 20, pp. 207267, 323.

It shall not be lawful for the head of any Executive Department or of any bureau, branch, or office of the Government, to cause to be printed, nor shall the Public Printer print, any document or matter of any character whatever except that which is authorized by law and necessary to administer the public business, nor shall any bureau officer embrace in his annual or other report to be printed any matter not directly pertaining to the duties of his office as prescribed by law.Stats. at L., rol. 23, p. 227.

All printing, binding, and blank books for the Senate or House of Representatives, and the Executive and Judicial Departments, shall be done at the Government Printing Office, except in cases otherwise provided by law.-R. S., sec. 3786.

No printing or binding shall be done, or blank books furnished, for either House of Congress, except on the written order of the Secretary of the Senate, or of the Clerk of the House of Representatives, respectively; or for any of the Executive Departments, except on a written requisition by the head of such Department, or one of his assistants.-R. S., sec. 3789.

The forms and style in which the printing or binding ordered by any of the departments shall be executed, the materials and size of type to be used, shall be determined by the Congres. sional Printer, having proper regard to economy, workmanship, and the purposes for which the work is needed.R. S., sec, 3790.

There shall be printed seven hundred and fifty copies of every bill or joint resolution ordered by either House of Congress, or required by any rule thereof to be printed, unless a different number shall be specifically ordered.—R. S., sec. 3791. (See Rule XLV.)

Fifteen hundred and fifty copies of any document ordered by Congress shall be printed, and that number shall be known as the usual number. No greater number shall be printed unless ordered by either House, or as hereinafter provided.-R. S., sec. 3792.

Whenever any document or report shall be ordered printed .by Congress, there shall be printed, in addition to the number in each case stated, the “usual number” of copies for binding and distribution among those entitled to receive them; and this shall apply to all unexecuted orders now in the office of the Public Printer.—Stats. at L., vol. 22, p. 387.

All motions to print extra copies of any bill, report, or other public document, shall be referred to the Committee on Printing of the House in which such motion is made.-R. S., sec. 3795.

The House first ordering a document to be printed shall immediately notify the other House of such order.-R. S., sec.3791.

All propositions in either House of Congress for printing extra copies of documents, the cost of which exceeds five hundred dollars, shall be by concurrent resolution, which shall, pon its transmission from either House, be immediately referred to the Committee on Printing of the House to which it is sent.-R. S., sec. 3795.

The Congressional (Public] Printer shall, when so directed by the Joint Committee on the Library, print, in addition to the usual number, either fifty or one hundred copies as he may be directed, of all documents printed by order of either House of Congress or of any Department or bureau of the Government.R. S., sec. 3796.

The annual report of the Postmaster-General of offers received and contracts for conveying the mail shall not be printed unless specially ordered by either House of Congress.—R. S., sec. 3797.

Of the documents named in this section there shall be printed and bound, in addition to the usual number for Congress, the following numbers of copies, namely:

First. Of the documents accompanying the annual reports of the Executive Departments, one thousand copies for the use of the Members of the Senate, and two thousand copies for the use of the Members of the House of Representatives.

Second. Of the President's message, the annual reports of the Executive Departments, and the abridgment of accompanying documents, unless otherwise ordered by either House, ten thousand copies for the use of the Members of the Senate, and twenty-five thousand copies for the use of the Members of the House of Representatives.

Third. Of papers relating to foreign affairs, acconipanying the annual message of the President, two thousand copies for the use of the Members of the Senate, and four thousand copies for the use of the Members of the House of Representatives.

Fourth. Of the “Commercial Relations," annually prepared under the direction of the State Department, two thousand copies for the use of the Members of the Senate, and three thousand copies for the use of the Members of the House of Representatives.

Fifth. Of the annual report on the statistics of commerce and navigation, exports and imports, merchandise in transit, manufactures, and registered and enrolled vessels, prepared by the Special Commissioner of the Revenue, two thousand copies

« PreviousContinue »