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of the first magnitude, is in the left knee. It forms a triangle with Denebola and Spica, and also one with Denebola and Cor Caroli. It travels in its orbit fifty-four miles per second, or more than three times as fast as the earth. Its light reaches the earth in about twenty-six years. Mirac (s) lies in the girdle, <5 in the right shoulder, Alkaturops ((*) in the club, /3 in the head, and Seginus (7) in the left shoulder. Seginus forms with Cor Caroli and Arcturus a triangle, right-angled at Seginus. Three small stars in the left hand of Bootes lie near Benetnasch.

Mythological history.—Bootes is supposed to have been Areas, the son of Callisto. (See Ursa Major.)

Hercules is represented as a warrior clad in the skin of the Nemsean Hon, holding a club in his right hand and the dog Cerberus in his left. His foot is near the head of Draco, while his head lies 38° south, and his club reaches 10 degrees beyond.

The principal star is Bas Algethi (a of Hercules and £ of Serpentarius). This forms a triangle with /3 and S. A peculiar figure of four stars *i, e), north of these, marks the body. (See Maps, Nos. 5, 7, and 7.) The left knee is pointed out by 6, and the left foot by y.

Mythological history.—This constellation immortalizes the name of one of the greatest heroes of antiquity. Hercules was the son of Jupiter and Alcmena. While he was yet lying in his cradle, Juno, in her jealousy, sent two serpents to destroy him. The precocious infant, however, strangled them with his hands. By the canning artifice of Juno, Hercules was made subject to Eurystheus, his elder half-brother, and compelled to perform all his commands. Eurystheus enjoined upon him a series of the most difficult and dangerous enterprises which could be conceived. These are termed the " Twelve Labors of Hercules." Having completed these tasks, he afterward achieved others equally celebrated. Near the close of his life he killed the centaur Nessus. The dying monster charged Dejanira, the wife of Hercules, to preserve a portion of his blood as a charm to use in case the love of her husband should ever fail her. In time, Dejanira thought she needed the potion, and Hercules having sent for a white robe to wear at a sacrifice, she steeped the garment in the blood of Nessus. No sooner had Hercules put on the fatal robe than the venom stung his bones and boiled through his veins. He attempted to tear it off, but in vain. It stuck to his flesh, and tore off great pieces of his body. The hero finding he must die, ascended Mount (Eta, where he erected a funeral pyre, spread out the skin of the Nemaean lion, and laid himself down upon it. Philoctetes applied the torch. With perfect serenity of countenance Hercules awaited approaching death —

"Till the god, the earthly part forsaken.

From the man in flames asunder taken,

Drank the heavenly ether-s purer breath.

Joyous in the new unwonted lightness

Soared he upward to celestial brightness,

Earth-s dark, heavy burden lost in death."

Schiller.

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Corona consists of six stars arranged in a semicircular form. The brightest of these is Alphacca. This makes a triangle, with Mirac (e) and <$ in Bootes. It forms a similar figure with Mirac and Arcturus.

Serpentarius, or Ophiuchus, the serpentbearer, is represented under the figure of a man grasping in both hands a prodigious serpent, which is writhing in his grasp.

Principal stars.—Bas Alhague (a), in the head, is of the second magnitude. It is about 5° from Bas Algethi. They form a pair of stars conspicuous like the pairs in Gemini, Canis Minor, Canis Major, etc. 8 marks the right shoulder, and x the left. There is them with his hands. By the canning artifice of Juno, Hercules was made subject to Eurystheus, his elder half-brother, and compelled to perform all his commands. Eurystheus enjoined upon him a series of the most difficult and dangerous enterprises which could be conceived. These are termed the " Twelve Labors of Hercules." Having completed these tasks, he afterward achieved others equally celebrated. Near the close of his life he killed the centaur Nessus. The dying monster charged Dej anira, the wife of Hercules, to preserve a portion of his blood as a charm to use in case the love of her husband should ever fail her. In time, Dejauira thought she needed the potion, and Hercules having sent for a white robe to wear at a sacrifice, she steeped the garment in the blood of Nessus. No sooner had Hercules put on the fatal robe than the venom stung his bones and boiled through his veins. He attempted to tear it off, but in vain. It stuck to his flesh, and tore off great pieces of his body. The hero finding he must die, ascended Mount (Eta, where he erected a funeral pyre, spread out the skin of the Nemaean lion, and laid himself down upon it. Philoctetes applied the torch. With perfect serenity of countenance Hercules awaited approaching death—

"Till the god, the earthly part forsaken,
From the man in flames asunder taken,
Drank the heavenly ether-s purer breath.
Joyous in the new unwonted lightness
Soared he upward to celestial brightness.
Earth-s dark, heavy burden lost in death."

SOHILLHR.

[merged small][graphic]

Corona consists of six stars arranged in a semicircular form. The brightest of these is Alphacca. This makes a triangle, with Mirac (e) and 6 in Bootes. It forms a similar figure with Mirac and Arcturus.

Serpentariu8, or OpTiiuchus, the serpentbearer, is represented under the figure of a man grasping in both hands a prodigious serpent, which is writhing in his grasp.

Principal stars.—Eas Alhague (a), in the head, is of the second magnitude. It is about 5° from Eas Algethi. They form a pair of stars conspicuous like the pairs in Gemini, Canis Minor, Canis Major, etc. 0 marks the right shoulder, and x the left. There is

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