Milton's English Poetry: Being Entries from A Milton Encyclopedia

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Bucknell University Press, 1986 - Poetry - 248 pages
In this survey one may discover Milton as he saw himself and come to recapture some of his originality. The selections from A Milton Encyclopedia in this volume were written by experts in each subject.

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Contents

On the University Carrier
103
On Time
104
Paradise Lost
105
Paradise Regained
143
Passion The
173
Psalms Miltons Translations from the
174
Samson Agonistes
182
On May Morning
210

Lycidas
45
Mask A
67
On Shakespeare
87
On the Death of a Fair Infant Dying of a Cough
88
On the Morning of Christs Nativity
91
On the New Forcers of Conscience under the Long Parliament
101
Sonnets Miltons
211
UPON THE CIRCUMCISION
224
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
226
CONTRIBUTORS AND CONTRIBUTIONS
244
INDEX
246
Copyright

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Page 114 - The end then of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him, as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of true virtue, which being united to the heavenly grace of faith, makes up the highest perfection.
Page 80 - Arm his profane tongue with contemptuous words Against the sun-clad power of Chastity, Fain would I something say ; — yet to what end ? Thou hast nor ear, nor soul, to apprehend The sublime notion, and high mystery...
Page 28 - O'er the smooth enamelled green, Where no print of step hath been, Follow me, as I sing And touch the warbled string: Under the shady roof Of branching elm star-proof Follow me. I will bring you where she sits, Clad in splendour as befits Her deity. Such a rural Queen All Arcadia hath not seen.
Page 121 - I am who fill Infinitude, nor vacuous the space. Though I uncircumscribed myself retire, And put not forth my goodness, which is free To act or not, Necessity and Chance Approach not me, and what I will is Fate.
Page 98 - The lonely mountains o'er and the resounding shore a voice of weeping heard and loud lament ; from haunted spring and dale edged with poplar pale the parting Genius is with sighing sent; with flower-inwoven tresses torn the nymphs in twilight shade of tangled thickets mourn.
Page 114 - Many there be that complain of divine Providence for suffering Adam to transgress. Foolish tongues! when God gave him reason, he gave him freedom to choose, for reason is but choosing; he had been else a mere artificial Adam, such an Adam as he is in the motions.
Page 124 - Fallen Cherub, to be weak is miserable, Doing or suffering: but of this be sure, To do aught good never will be our task, But ever to do ill our sole delight, As being the contrary to his high will Whom we resist.
Page 43 - Cloud, While rocking Winds are Piping loud, Or usher'd with a shower still, When the gust hath blown his fill, Ending on the russling Leaves, With minute drops from off the Eaves. And when the Sun begins to fling His flaring beams...
Page 95 - THIS is the month, and this the happy morn, Wherein the Son of Heaven's eternal King, Of wedded maid and virgin mother born, Our great redemption from above did bring...

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